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Thread: HD ide on pc xt??

  1. #1

    Default HD ide on pc xt??

    Hi guys, I know you are phenomena and always manage to solve the problems of others, you are fantastic !!

    Since I have an IBM clone to be exact I have a Philips PCB100 of 1990/91,I would like to insert in IDE hard disk,on the motherboard with 2 connections one for floppy and the other for hard disk (40 pins).
    I tried using bios to set up hard disk but from bios I can only change the date and disable floppy 1 and floppy 2.
    I tried to install many types of modern and old hard disks like the Caviar 1210 200mb but I could not make it recognizable..
    I also tried to change all the jumpers on the motherboard but nothing is never recognized.
    Is it possible to start an ide hard disk on this motherboard?

    14075204_10205994075966073_342739617_o.jpg

  2. #2

    Default

    Some later 8088 computers (eg. Commodore PC 10-III) had 8bit pre-IDE interface (XTA). Only a few drivers supported this mode of operation.
    You will find some info here: http://www.vcfed.org/forum/showthrea...odore-PC10-III

  3. #3
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    Default

    If that is an 8088/XT based system and that is really an IDE port, then it probably needs one of the rare XTA IDE drives instead of an ATA IDE drive.

  4. #4

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    So the classic IDE are all 16 bit

    So it is possible that this motherboard does not recognize the 16 bit IDE..

  5. #5
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    Yes. You may have an old drive that has a jumper/dip switches to designate XTA.
    Thomas Byers (DRI)- "You'll have a million people using the A> [MS-DOS prompt] forever. You'll have five million using [nongraphic] menu systems such as Topview, Concurrent PC-DOS, Desq, and those types. But there'll be 50 to 100 million using the iconic-based interfaces."

  6. #6
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    I would take a peek/google at using an XT-IDE or XT-CF card in the system, which will allow you to run a 16 bit drive or CompactFlash card and have nice things like auto-detect.

    If you have the option to disable the onboard HDC (jumper somewhere?) you could also run traditional MFM or RLL as most XT's did. (Quite common to find a Commodore PC10 with an XTA connector for IDE, but a generic MFM/RLL card and drive installed).
    WTB: IBM RT Parts and Accessories, and AOS.
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  7. #7

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    Please post a picture of your Philips. PCB 100 makes no sense. Grazie!

  8. #8

    Default

    Hi Peter, I posted it to the first message at the end of the text ..

  9. #9

    Default

    Hi guys, not to open a new discussion use this even if we are almost off topic.
    As already written on another discussion for reasons of virus I had to format XT, but after installing MS-DOS (original disks for the pc) I do not know why it does not start from the hard disk but only from floppy, I have done many tests re-installing dos again after having re-formatted it but unfortunately it does not seem to be an installation problem or at least I think, I tried to detach the floppy drive but the problem persists.
    Help me, thank you all as always!

  10. #10
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    A few things need to be done in order to make a bootable HDD:
    1) You need to have DOS on the first partition
    2) The partition needs to be of the 'primary' type
    3) The partition needs to have the 'active' flag set
    4) The partition needs to have the system files installed correctly.

    You can check and set the 'active' flag with fdisk.
    You should normally format the disk with the /s parameter so the system is transferred immediately.
    If you forgot that, you can also use the 'sys' command to transfer the system files to an already formatted disk, to make it bootable.

    If you've done all that, it should just work (I assume the disk itself is detected by the BIOS and is working, since you managed to install MS-DOS on it).

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