Image Map Image Map
Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 23

Thread: How use programmer to burn Supersoft roms.

  1. #11

    Default

    That's interesting. Regards getting one from another board, I wish these Dell System 200's were that more common so I could but they are extremely rare which is not surprising if these chips fail taking the firmware with them. I'm still hoping the firmware is untouched inside, otherwise it could be the end of this Dell too. I wish I knew more about this sort of thing as the most important thing just now is getting the firmware out of it providing its still there. I bet there is a way I can set up this new programmers software to read out this firmware by entering in the memory location the firmware is in. Only if I knew where & how.

  2. #12

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by roadrash View Post
    This is the chip that I believe is faulty and need to get the firmware from.

    Attachment 42987
    if the chip is faulty, what makes you think you can read the firmware from it? dead eprom is dead eprom.

  3. #13

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by BloodyCactus View Post
    if the chip is faulty, what makes you think you can read the firmware from it? dead eprom is dead eprom.
    I see what you mean. I'm not 100% sure this is what is what is causing the gate A20 error but its seems its the most likely. I am just hoping its still functioning enough to allow access to its memory even if its not fully 100% working and of course if its not readable it also confirms that it is indeed this chip that's causing the gate A20 error. Then I will have to try and get this firmware from some ware or its the end of this otherwise perfect computer. Surely you would think somewhere at Dell they would have records of this firmware. I get no where asking Dell they just say we no longer offer support for that model.

  4. #14

    Default

    Well I just tried my new "TL866A mini pro" to burn those Landamark Supersoft Diagnostic Roms and it all went without a hitch programming and verifying both roms. Well at least I know it works and ive burnt my first ever Eproms. A lot more to learn now I reckon. Thanks everyone. Now I can stick them in this Dell System 200 and see if they give any more info on this Gate A20 error.

  5. #15
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Melbourne, Australia
    Posts
    5,850

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by BloodyCactus View Post
    if the chip is faulty, what makes you think you can read the firmware from it? dead eprom is dead eprom.
    The keyboard controller chip is not a ROM/EPROM.
    It is a microcontroller that contains custom code in its ROM component (for the 8042) or EPROM component (for the 8742).

    Sometimes things do not completely fail; they can partially fail. It is possible for a keyboard controller chip fail in a way that does not affect the abilty to read/write the ROM/EPROM component. For example, referring to the diagram at [here], failure of the transistor that drives the P21 output line.

  6. #16

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by modem7 View Post
    The keyboard controller chip is not a ROM/EPROM.
    It is a microcontroller that contains custom code in its ROM component (for the 8042) or EPROM component (for the 8742).

    Sometimes things do not completely fail; they can partially fail. It is possible for a keyboard controller chip fail in a way that does not affect the abilty to read/write the ROM/EPROM component. For example, referring to the diagram at [here], failure of the transistor that drives the P21 output line.
    Yes I do understand that Modem7 but thanks. I was just saying I had made these roms with my new programmer as it was suggested I try the SuperSoft diagnostic roms. Ive just answered your private message to me but you have just answered one of my questions regarding getting firmware from that possibly damaged keyboard controller, Thanks.

  7. #17

    Default

    I doubt you can read the code inside the 8742 with any kind of diagnostic code. About the most you can get would be an OK or fail message. The 8742 code is not on the bus. The part is a Manchester type architecture. As I recall it can't even see its own code from instructions or at least from a limited basis on the same memory page, such as a translation table. You'll need to have the proper adapter on a programmer that is set up to read the 8742.
    I think you've been missing what I've been saying. The chips code is likely quite generic. I don't think you need to get one specifically from a Dell. Most any AT mother board of any manufacture will have either a 8042 or 8742 on it with the needed code inside. I don't believe Dell would go out of there way to write 8042 code.
    Dwight

  8. #18
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Melbourne, Australia
    Posts
    5,850

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by roadrash View Post
    Yes I do understand that Modem7 but thanks.
    I was responding to BloodyCactus' statement.

    Quote Originally Posted by Dwight Elvey View Post
    I doubt you can read the code inside the 8742 with any kind of diagnostic code.
    There is a separate thread. The OP has made a call on the keyboard controller based solely on beep codes. I suggested using the Supersoft ROMs to see what they suggest is the problem area of the motherboard.

    Quote Originally Posted by Dwight Elvey View Post
    I think you've been missing what I've been saying. The chips code is likely quite generic.
    The OP has already tried the keyboard controller from his functional IBM 5170, to no avail.

  9. #19

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by modem7 View Post

    The OP has already tried the keyboard controller from his functional IBM 5170, to no avail.
    Ahh, I didn't read that part. Sorry.
    One can use the specification data sheet for the 8742 under programming and make a reader using an Arduino board. These can be had for less then $10 and the software IDE is free. You need to program in a little bit of C. There are lots of exampled on how to wiggle the pins.
    In order to read the 8742, you do need to supply 18volts to one of the pins ( you don't need the 25V programming voltage ). The sequence is in the data sheet, just don't drive the programming voltage.
    It is either that or get a programmer that states it programs 8742/8741s and get an adapter. I don't know of any programmer that does them without the adapter.
    Dwight

  10. #20

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Dwight Elvey View Post
    Ahh, I didn't read that part. Sorry.
    One can use the specification data sheet for the 8742 under programming and make a reader using an Arduino board. These can be had for less then $10 and the software IDE is free. You need to program in a little bit of C. There are lots of exampled on how to wiggle the pins.
    In order to read the 8742, you do need to supply 18volts to one of the pins ( you don't need the 25V programming voltage ). The sequence is in the data sheet, just don't drive the programming voltage.
    It is either that or get a programmer that states it programs 8742/8741s and get an adapter. I don't know of any programmer that does them without the adapter.
    Dwight
    If the chip from the 5170 didn't work, it is quite likely that there is something else wrong. The AT bus activity to turn on A20 is quite specified on the AT machines. I doubt the command to the 8242 from the bus is any different on a Dell or on a IBM. Even if it had different code inside, it would need to look the same from the bus. There might be differences, though, on which pin drove A20, on the 8742. That is possible but not likely. A schematic would show any pin differences.
    Dwight

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •