Image Map Image Map
Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 23

Thread: How use programmer to burn Supersoft roms.

  1. #1

    Default How use programmer to burn Supersoft roms.

    My pogramer arrived today but I am unsure how to go about programming & reading the roms I have to do.
    I want to burn a set of SuperSoft diagnostic roms to use on my Dell System 200 and my 5170 and i bought a couple of erased 27C256 Eproms to use..
    The Programmer I bought is this one here: http://www.autoelectric.cn/en/tl866_main.html
    I found a suported devices list here: http://www.autoelectric.cn/minipro/m...upportlist.txt
    And finaly here is a review that persuaded me to buy it: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FLG03f_ua5g

    Its sounds like it will do what I want to do with it but I cant find a tutorial on how to dump and program a eprom like a Supersoft diagnostics Rom set and a bios rom. This device covers quite a lot of roms but I also cant find any reference to the Keyboard controller chip in my Dell System 200 which is a 40 pin Intel D8742 which I want to read the firmware from (data sheet here: http://matthieu.benoit.free.fr/cross...eets/D8742.pdf

    Please can someone help me get started with using this new device.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Silicon Forest, Oregon, USA
    Posts
    654

    Default

    Using TL866CS/TL866A programmer is pretty obvious. It is all menu driven - just select the right chip, load the image, insert the EEPROM chip in the programmer (note the chip orientation, there is a drawing on the programmer itself), and click the program button.

    Dumping ROMs: It depends...
    - If you can extract the ROMs from the system, you can insert them into the programmer, and use read function to read the ROM (and then you can save the image to the file). Make sure to configure the proper device type before you try to insert or read the ROM.
    - If you can't or don't want to extract ROMs, you might be able to use DEBUG command to copy the ROM content to a file. See this thread.
    - Intel D8742... that's a microcontroller that was programmed with a keyboard controller firmware. You might or might not be able to read it. Some (many?!) manufacturers set read protection on these things. But I am wondering why would you want to dump it anyway?

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Pacific Northwest, USA
    Posts
    25,648
    Blog Entries
    20

    Default

    The 8742 should not have any privacy fuses, but reading the contents takes a bit of ballet. See the datasheet--just leave out the "programming" part in the step-by-step.

  4. #4

    Default

    Thank you for that helpful info guys. I dont know why but I got the impression this programmer automatically identified each chip you put in but it seems not. I still don't seem to be able find the 8742 chip in the list or am I looking in the wrong place? Sergy, the reason I need to read the firmware out of the 8742 is covered in this thread which is hopefully still to be resolved: http://www.vcfed.org/forum/showthread.php?61080-Dell-System-200-Keyboard-error&highlight=roadrash"
    Without the firmware from the original controller I cant fix this particular dell system. Ok well I will start by trying to burn those 2 Supersoft diagnostic roms first.

  5. #5

    Default

    Usually the 8742/8741 take an adapter to read on a standard programmer. The tl866 programmers might have the right software but you'd need the adapter. The programmer needs a 18V setting to program them. I don't know if the tl866 supports that.
    The plastic 8742 are one time programmable and can't be reprogrammed. You'd need to get a windowed 8742 that can be erased with a UV light. This assumes that you can get meaningful code off the 8742 you have. Most times these chips just fail ( dead ) and not an issue of bit rot.
    Dwight
    Last edited by Dwight Elvey; January 12th, 2018 at 06:21 AM.

  6. #6

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Dwight Elvey View Post
    Usually the 8742/8741 take an adapter to read on a standard programmer. The tl866 programmers might have the right software but you'd need the adapter. The programmer needs a 18V setting to program them. I don't know if the tl866 supports that.
    The plastic 8742 are one time programmable and can't be reprogrammed. You'd need to get a windowed 8742 that can be erased with a UV light. This assumes that you can get meaningful code off the 8742 you have. Most times these chips just fail ( dead ) and not an issue of bit rot.
    Dwight
    Thanks for that info Dwight, That is exactly what happened to mine. It had been working perfect and literally turned it off to get some dinner or something (I cant remember now) but when I turned it back on I just got a series of beeps which apparently mean Gate A20 fault. This is such a shame as this Dell SyTstem 200" PC clone is in pristine condition and they are almost non existent now. If I cant get the firmware out of mine I will have to hope I can find someone willing to donate the firmware from theirs.

  7. #7

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by roadrash View Post
    Thanks for that info Dwight, That is exactly what happened to mine. It had been working perfect and literally turned it off to get some dinner or something (I cant remember now) but when I turned it back on I just got a series of beeps which apparently mean Gate A20 fault. This is such a shame as this Dell SyTstem 200" PC clone is in pristine condition and they are almost non existent now. If I cant get the firmware out of mine I will have to hope I can find someone willing to donate the firmware from theirs.
    Is this the chip in the keyboard or the one in the PC. The ones in the PC are almost all the same. If it is the one in the PC, you might just find another AT mother board and try that keyboard input. It sounds like that is the case. It sounds like it needs to be a AT one though.
    Dwight

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Silicon Forest, Oregon, USA
    Posts
    654

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Dwight Elvey View Post
    Is this the chip in the keyboard or the one in the PC. The ones in the PC are almost all the same. If it is the one in the PC, you might just find another AT mother board and try that keyboard input. It sounds like that is the case. It sounds like it needs to be a AT one though.
    Dwight
    That's what I was going to say... You can try using another "generic" AT keyboard controller: 8242PC/Intel 82C42PC/VIA VT82C42N. When ordering an Intel 8042/8242 make sure it is actually programmed with the keyboard firmware. They would normally say AMI or Phoenix on them.

  9. #9

    Default

    This is the chip that I believe is faulty and need to get the firmware from.

    20171205_143350.jpg

  10. #10

    Default

    One could probably make an Arduino into a reader, looking at the specification. The only
    significant issues are 3.3V to 5 volt translations and a little more serious is the 18V needed to put it
    into the program/verify mode.
    I still think you don't need to go that far. Just get another from some other board.
    Dwight

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •