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Thread: Japanese 'Engineered' Solder Sucker

  1. #31
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
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    1918 Calico Drive Manson, WA 98831
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    What's the weight of this solder sucker? Is it available on Amazon? One of my fellow use this solder sucker and his feedback was good though he didn't give a link where can I purchase this solder sucker.

  2. Default

    I've seen it a few days ago on Amazon. You can check it.

  3. #33
    Join Date
    Feb 2017
    Location
    Chilliwack, BC, Canada
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    I've got an Aven 17536 that I got from Digi-Key, which doesn't work TOO bad after 1 or two tries if I can get the solder hot enough without lifting the pads. What do you guys use to lubricate them with?

    Solder wick has it's uses, but isn't the be-all-end-all either.

    I'm thinking of getting an actual desoldering pump iron, but don't want to spend the $350 if I can avoid it. Anybody got experience with one of these: https://www.amazon.ca/YaeCCC-Electri...99-spons&psc=1 It doesn't look too bad from what I've seen, but probably needs to be rewired with a ground lug.
    My vintage systems: Tandy 1000 HX & Tandy 1000 RSX

    Some people keep a classic car in their garage. Some people keep vintage computers. The latter hobby is cheaper, usually takes less space, and is less likely to lead to a fatal accident.

  4. #34

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    I have a cheap chinese solder sucker i bought years ago which hasn't been too bad to use but it's pretty much worn out now and need to get a new one, I used some light lubricant to keep the seals inside lubricated. I don't have any experience with the pump you linked to on Amazon but years ago i bought a CSI 474 Desoldering station and when new i found the suction capacity wasn't up to much and got worse as it got older, I'd rate it on par with the chinese solder sucker now but it wasn't so cheap.

    Over the years i've found i can often do a better and often quicker job just using an iron and a decent stainless steel safety pin or Hollow needle + flux and wick rather than use the sucker or station.

  5. #35
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Pacific Northwest, USA
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    Dave over at YT eevblog did a review of the ZD985 desoldering station (and there are some other YT vids on it).

    If I did a lot of rework, I might consider getting one.

  6. #36
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Location
    Burnley, UK
    Posts
    185

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    I've been soldering/desoldering for most of my life. I used to use a solder sucker for larger CRT TV circuit boards and it was fine. I've always found them to be awful for smaller vintage computer work - partly because the Teflon sucker tube is too big for use on through hole IC pins for example and partly because the kick back from the plunger can end up dislodging the copper traces/pads around the pins if you are not very carefull.

    I got a vacuum desoldering station some months back:

    https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Pro-Desol...QAAOSwuMRbgc~e

    I've never looked back. It opens up a whole new world of desoldering possibilities. I removed 8 4116 RAM ICs from a friends TI 99 motherboard not long ago and replaced them with sockets - he was able to test the RAM ICs and replace two he found defective. It took me an hour and a half of careful work but it was so easy and such a clean job.

    I also coat all the solder joints to be desoldered with liquid flux - on both sides of the board. So not just the PCB trace side but on the component side too - helps the solder to flow out of the joint nice and easily and keeps everything clean as the joint is heated.

    https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Flux-Sold...item361e9ac1d8

    I don't have a lot of spare cash - but 80 on a vacuum desoldering station has not been a regrettable purchase.

    In terms of diagnosing logic IC faults - im an impatient, under skilled moron. Having this desoldering station plus my chip tester makes the job of removing ICs for testing a quick and dirty affair for someone with lesser skills like me.

  7. #37
    Join Date
    Feb 2017
    Location
    Chilliwack, BC, Canada
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    128

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    Yeah, non THP solder pads aren't very forgiving.
    My vintage systems: Tandy 1000 HX & Tandy 1000 RSX

    Some people keep a classic car in their garage. Some people keep vintage computers. The latter hobby is cheaper, usually takes less space, and is less likely to lead to a fatal accident.

  8. #38
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
    Location
    Los Angeles, CA
    Posts
    449

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    Quote Originally Posted by alan8086 View Post
    I got a vacuum desoldering station some months back:

    https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Pro-Desol...QAAOSwuMRbgc~e
    I have one of these also and so far it's been great. I don't do enough work to justify a hakko, but enough that hand desoldering with a soldering iron and the little blue solder suckers would keep me delaying projects because it would take so long, especially with IC's.

    Regarding the blue solder suckers, I had one that wasn't too bad but I also had one (that came in a 3 pack), that was mostly unusable. If you have one with a good spring but too used that you need to buy another one, save the good spring because some of them come with truly useless springs.
    -- Brian

    Working Systems: Apple IIe/II+/Mac+, Atari 800/520STFM, Commodore 64/Amiga 3000/SX-64, IBM PS/1 2121-B82, Kaypro II, Tandy 1000 SX, TI-99/4A, TRS-80 Model 4 GA
    Project Systems: Mac 512K, Amstrad PCW 8256, Kaypro 2/84 (Bad Chips: 81-194, 81-189).

  9. #39
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Pacific Northwest, USA
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    For blue solder suckers, it's been my experience that you still can't beat the old original Edsyn Soldapullt.

  10. #40
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Central VA
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    4,298

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    I just ordered one of these little solder suckers after getting to actually pick one up and check it out at conmega's place. Mine hasn't come in yet. They seem to be very well built, I like the use of high temperature silicone tubing on the tip instead of the stiff Teflon tip usually found on these devices. I have a Hakko 472D vacuum desoldering station and use it all the time (*highly* recommend them, wouldn't bother with a knockoff when you can pick up the used Hakkos for reasonable money). I still use a spring-type solder sucker though, sometimes I only need to clear a few through-holes, or it's something with a really large mounting hole that's easy to desolder with a spring-type unit.

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