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Thread: Japanese 'Engineered' Solder Sucker

  1. #21
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    I can clearly recall that over the last 15 years I've gone from the traditional desoldering bulb (compact but plugs easily), to the Radio Shack desoldering iron (cumbersome), to a clone of the OP's desoldering pen (worked great but DAMN that recoil), to a Hakko 808 clone (AMAZING on anything up to two layers, then it becomes more of a trace scratcher than a desoldering tool and GOD DAMN those heating elements suck) and now I am using one of the previously mentioned SoldaPullt spring loaded suckers for general use and a much older Weller/Ungar 4024 series station for multi-layer boards.
    = Excellent space heater

  2. #22
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    I must confess to being surprised no one has come up with a consistently good desoldering tool.

    So far this Japanese one is ok. I have had to desolder the four tvt boards I made. It doesn't get everything and easily plugs itself.. but when you get it just right it clears it all out of there.

  3. #23
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    They can be had for the right price. I've thought about building one out of a small vacuum cleaner.

  4. #24
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    A lot of it is technique. I've done a lot of satisfactory work with very cheap tools.

  5. #25
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    I agree. I used the cheapy Ratio Shack Soldapullt-alike an awful lot with excellent results over the years (at various times I had that at work and the real deal at home and vice versa).

  6. #26

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    Quote Originally Posted by glitch View Post
    A lot of it is technique. I've done a lot of satisfactory work with very cheap tools.
    Guess I'm fortunate to work for a company that uses digital rework stations (and they don't mind you working on something personal after-hours).

    pace.jpg

    The problem with having one at home would be the high initial cost and the added cost of consumables (filters, tips, etc). But as mentioned, technique (and practice) is a lot of it. You can get much done with a standard solder-sucker, or be completely useless with a high-end tool.

  7. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by KC9UDX View Post
    They can be had for the right price. I've thought about building one out of a small vacuum cleaner.
    I just use my normal vacuum with a piece of tubing with an aluminum tip:

    SolderSucker2.JPG

  8. #28
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    Jun 2012
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    Quote Originally Posted by paul View Post
    Lay the last 1/8" or 1/4" of braid over the pad and apply the solder iron tip over that. The heat conducts quickly through the copper braid and will wick up all the solder. On small pads it's much easier to avoid delaminating the pad from overheating, or excess sucker vacuum.

    If there's a lot of solder, either use a sucker to start with then finish with the braid, or start the braid at about 1/2" from the end and slowly pull it over the pad as it fills up.
    I've been using the braid for years. It's so much easier and cleaner than any kind of sucker I've used. What I do is warm it up and dip it in flux. It soaks up the solder like a sponge.

  9. #29

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    I think the Japanese/metal solder sucker is a step up from the plastic ones. The best thing though is the flexible silicone tip that you can replace. Not only does it not melt, but you can squeeze it into areas at an angle or apply pressure to it, etc.

    Solder wick/braid works much better if you wipe it with a flux pen first IMHO.

    I just recently got a Hakko FR300 and once I go the hang of it, it is so nice.

  10. #30
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    I have been using my Japanese one for a couple months now and I'm actually pretty impressed. I used to avoid desoldering ICs because I was never able to get enough solder out to avoid breaking legs off. I was *never* able to get braid to work at all. The Japanese thing absolutely clears every hole. There is a bit of a technique to it.. but once you have it down.. wow. I've pulled out four ICs in the last week with no problem at all. The silicone does not melt but it does break down eventually. And those little spare hoses are easy to lose. I dropped mine, couldn't find it, and am currently awaiting an order of replacements.

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