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Thread: Repair and Restoration Services

  1. #21
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    Yes, that might be handy to send as well.

    PM me when you're ready to ship and I'll tell you where to ship it.
    Legacy Computers and Parts

    Sales of, parts for, and repairs to, Vintage and Legacy computers.

  2. #22

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    Completely off topic, but I was considering purchasing this Packard Bell Legend 845 as a secondary 486 PC. The seller mentioned floppy drive failure and the removal of the CMOS battery socket. While both seem easily repaired, I was troubled by this photo of some greenish-blue corrosion near the where the CMOS battery socket was and was wondering if that could be easily fixed. VCFED.jpg I was also wondering if this could have something to do with the floppy drive issues, because if so, I'll most likely reconsider buying it.

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by PixelatedAI486 View Post
    Completely off topic, but I was considering purchasing this Packard Bell Legend 845 as a secondary 486 PC. The seller mentioned floppy drive failure and the removal of the CMOS battery socket. While both seem easily repaired, I was troubled by this photo of some greenish-blue corrosion near the where the CMOS battery socket was and was wondering if that could be easily fixed. I was also wondering if this could have something to do with the floppy drive issues, because if so, I'll most likely reconsider buying it.
    It seems to have spread beyond just the battery area to, at least, the chip adjacent to it.

    If I were faced with repairing this board, I would use a firm toothbrush and some vinegar to neutralize and remove the corrosion from any of the areas around there, re-tin the battery connection vias and any other surface areas it contacted, remove that IC clean the holes, again, with vinegar and fill them with solder.

    Then I'd remove the solder and replace the chip.

    As for it affecting the floppy drive control, without knowing what the chip is, It's difficult to determine if it might be part of the FDC section if it even has an on-board FDC.
    Legacy Computers and Parts

    Sales of, parts for, and repairs to, Vintage and Legacy computers.

  4. Default

    Good afternoon! I have a pair of PS/2 floppy drives which both have bad caps (a Mitsubishi MF355Q-99M3 and an Alps DFP723D15B) that I'm looking into getting repaired. I had attempted to recap the Mitsu drive however I unfortunately pulled four solder pads off whilst removing the old caps and am not very confident in the job I did attaching the others. I do need both of these drives as unfortunately both systems I pulled them from (Model 80 and P70) both need to have the setup program ran on them and I have been unsuccessful in finding replacements. What would be a rough estimate to having these drives serviced and repaired?

  5. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by 404TimeNotFound View Post
    Good afternoon! I have a pair of PS/2 floppy drives which both have bad caps (a Mitsubishi MF355Q-99M3 and an Alps DFP723D15B) that I'm looking into getting repaired. I had attempted to recap the Mitsu drive however I unfortunately pulled four solder pads off whilst removing the old caps and am not very confident in the job I did attaching the others. I do need both of these drives as unfortunately both systems I pulled them from (Model 80 and P70) both need to have the setup program ran on them and I have been unsuccessful in finding replacements. What would be a rough estimate to having these drives serviced and repaired?
    Yes, so I read.

    It's always difficult to tell without seeing the drives first, especially if there is damage. Are they dirty? Are they stuck? Has the drive been shorted? Does it need alignment beyond that?

    PS/2 drives are a funny lot. Some can be fixed between sips of coffee and others are an all day thing. Or a never thing.

    IF they can be repaired (see above) I would say that, probably, it would top out in the $50 USD range, but may be less.

    With our company, if we CAN'T fix it, you pay nothing but the shipping here and back (if you even want them back).

    We don't charge for TRYING to fix something, we charge for succeeding.
    Legacy Computers and Parts

    Sales of, parts for, and repairs to, Vintage and Legacy computers.

  6. Default

    First off thank you for the quick reply! Honestly $50-$60 doesn't seem that bad for having a drive refurbished, even better to know I won't have to worry about paying much if a drive is a lost cause.

    To give you a more in depth description of both drives (aside from needing re-capped), the Alps drive doesn't want to take disks a lot of the time and you almost have to force a disk in, and even then it won't read or write to one.

    The Mitsu drive, to put it simply, is a mess. Aside from the solder pads that came off the top board when I had tried to fix it, it looks like someone at some point used a flat-head screwdriver to pry the tray up and remove a stuck disk as it's bent and looks mis-aligned. It's also finicky about taking disks or bringing the tray down and engaging the mechanism (likely from being forced up).

    The drives themselves are very clean, as are the systems I pulled them from and none appear to be shorted out.

    I hope this helps give you a better idea of both drives, and if you don't want to deal with the Mitsu drive I would completely understand, it definitely would be a handful.

    Edit: I just saw you had replied to my thread in the wanted section, not sure how I missed that. To answer your question the IBM part number is 90X6766 and the manufacturer part number (Mitsubishi) is MF355W-99M3. However the same drive was also made by Sony and Alps (the Sony's P/N MP-F77W, I'm not sure of the P/N for the Alps drive).
    Last edited by 404TimeNotFound; September 27th, 2017 at 06:35 PM.

  7. #27
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    Well, neither of them sound like a good repair candidate, but, I've worked on worse....

    The first thing to do is to wait and see if I or anyone else on here can supply FRU 90X6766 replacement drives. I have a lot of stuff that isn't actually on the site (yet).

    When something is bent, it is usually fairly difficult to get it straight again and it turns into an exercise in Blacksmithery. I'm also concerned that the other one requires that you have to apply excessive force to get the disk in. That may be rust between the sliding parts or it may be bent too.

    I like a challenge, but, I'm not big on lost causes because we still have to do just as much work on something we charge for as something we don't charge for.

    It sounds like a replacement set would be the way to go, if reasonably priced, and then you'd know that they probably won't jam up somewhere in the future.

    Let's see what comes up.....
    Legacy Computers and Parts

    Sales of, parts for, and repairs to, Vintage and Legacy computers.

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