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Thread: IBM 5363 - IBM System/36

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
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    Kamloops, BC, Canada
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    Default IBM 5363 - IBM System/36

    This is the same machine that fellow member xxhellfirexx had available for pickup about a month and a half ago. Aside from a brief smoke test it's been waiting for the weather to improve before I could properly open it up, strip it down and give it a badly needed cleaning. It had been operating in an environment with light oil in the air so while it had the usual dust and fluff, it also had that gunky dust you get when it mixes with oil.

    Here are a few photos taken as the machine was opened and dismantled. Date codes are stamped everywhere and put the Date of Manufacture between January and May 1988, so this machine is now 30 years old.


    http://i11.photobucket.com/albums/a1...d/CGS_7877.jpg


    http://i11.photobucket.com/albums/a1...d/CGS_7890.jpg

    It looks like redundant power supplies but no, the PSU is actually made up of two separate supplies. One for the logic cage and the other for the peripherals and ISA bus.
    Yes I do have the matching back cover for the machine.


    http://i11.photobucket.com/albums/a1...d/CGS_7878.jpg


    http://i11.photobucket.com/albums/a1...d/CGS_7881.jpg

    Handy diagram indicating how the cards and jumpers were installed but they all looked so similar that I marked them all anyways before removing them.


    http://i11.photobucket.com/albums/a1...d/CGS_7882.jpg


    http://i11.photobucket.com/albums/a1...d/CGS_7883.jpg

    These were found rattling around inside. The label sticks to the side of the power supplies and the terminator plugs into one of the DASD's. I think the tech who installed the second drive pulled the terminator out and left it inside the machine as the last drive on the chain still has a terminator installed.


    http://i11.photobucket.com/albums/a1...d/CGS_7884.jpg

    Lots and lots of IBM's famous EVIL black foam. It was still somewhat solidified so it was a bit easier to scrape off.


    http://i11.photobucket.com/albums/a1...d/CGS_7886.jpg

    Like with some of the PS/2 machines the front switch is NOT the actual disconnect. There's a cable that runs back to the power supply and runs through this coupling. The master power switch is in there.


    http://i11.photobucket.com/albums/a1...d/CGS_7891.jpg

    Naked chassis.


    http://i11.photobucket.com/albums/a1...d/CGS_7887.jpg

    Everything cleaned and ready for reassembly. Here's a breakdown of what we have in the machine:


    http://i11.photobucket.com/albums/a1...d/CGS_7888.jpg

    Boards by part numbers:

    92X3293 --- CSP Board
    92X3294 --- DSA Board
    92X3224 --- Disk Adapter
    92X3292 --- MSP Board C
    92X3221 --- WSA Board
    92X3291 --- MSP Board D
    92X3295 --- Passthrough board


    http://i11.photobucket.com/albums/a1...d/CGS_7889.jpg

    Disk drives by part numbers:

    92X7320 --- 115mb Hard Disk, Type 0669 (ESDI)
    92X7320 --- 115mb Hard Disk, Type 0669 (ESDI)
    6369881 --- 1.2mb 5.25" floppy, Type 1718

    ISA boards by part numbers:

    6137397(XM) --- SDLC adapter
    83X9147A --- Token Ring adapter (as if the green dot on the back of the card was not obvious enough)
    92X3222 --- 1MB memory card
    92X3393 --- "Memory Card" (I assume this IS the 1mb of ram)
    92X7245 (92X7359) --- IOP Card

    I have not yet attempted an IPL. I got the terminal and cabling sorted but the cleaning came first and I think there's at least one fan that was sounding a bit sick.
    Also no key. It is currently set to Normal so aside from starting the IPL I can't do much else with the front panel.
    So aside from that IOP card which I cannot really tell what the hell it does (what's with the 9 pin port on the back?), is everything else in order?
    Last edited by NeXT; March 25th, 2018 at 04:13 PM.
    = Excellent space heater

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Atlanta, GA, USA
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    1,249

    Default

    Very, very.. and I mean 'very' cool!

    Thanks for posting the tear-down and clean-up pics. Looking forward to updates. While I never significantly used an IBM mid-range system directly, I did a lot of communication and interfacing to a pair of System/38's and later Gen.1 AS/400s in the late 80s and early 90s. They still have a special place in my memories and an open-slot on my collection bucket-list.
    "Good engineers keep thick authoritative books on their shelf. Not for their own reference, but to throw at people who ask stupid questions; hoping a small fragment of knowledge will osmotically transfer with each cranial impact." - Me

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Kamloops, BC, Canada
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    Default

    Well the good news is that after putting it all back together and giving it ten minutes we got an IPL Sign-On.


    http://i11.photobucket.com/albums/a1...d/CGS_7893.jpg

    The bad news however is that so far the possible usernames and passwords given to me by the previous owner are not working...
    = Excellent space heater

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Kamloops, BC, Canada
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    Default

    Somebody requested photos of the rather odd Quarterdeck 120 external Twinax interfaced QIC tape drive. On the inside you have a mix of a Wangtek 5125EG, Assy. No: 30126-826, an Everex EV-826 and the special Quarterdeck Twinax tape interface board.


    http://i11.photobucket.com/albums/a1...d/CGS_7898.jpg


    http://i11.photobucket.com/albums/a1...d/CGS_7900.jpg


    http://i11.photobucket.com/albums/a1...d/CGS_7899.jpg


    http://i11.photobucket.com/albums/a1...d/CGS_7894.jpg


    http://i11.photobucket.com/albums/a1...d/CGS_7895.jpg


    http://i11.photobucket.com/albums/a1...d/CGS_7896.jpg

    It too also cleaned up and passed a smoke test however in the process of inspecting the roller it became clear it was in the process of perishing.
    = Excellent space heater

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Kamloops, BC, Canada
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    Default

    As it stand right now I've been able to identify four user ID's and still not one password. A replacement key has supposedly been created with the lock identifier stamped on the front but it may take a week for it to arrive to verify if it in fact works. Failing that we will need to perform a series of steps from the old Usenet post on cracking the MASTER account for a 5360. For posterity here is that procedure with a few grammatical fixes that were driving me nuts.

    I finally found something I mislaid two years ago, and Promised to post -
    the full instructions on breaking a lost password on S/36. I do not have a functional 36
    here just now, so I cannot debug this or offer advice beyond
    this verbatim transcript, but I do know It worked for me once!


    Either


    A)
    36 Put into service mode
    Press MSP STOP (for alter / display menus)
    Option 1 - Display main storage address 0A17
    This is a three-byte start-of-address of on-disk VTOC.
    Display this disk address (Option 2).
    Scroll through until you find VTOC "F1 *. SECUID0
    Hex displacement at 27 is this entry into the three-byte address of the security start-of-date files.


    or


    A)
    36 Put into service mode
    Press MSP STOP (for alter / display menus)
    Option 1 - Display main storage address 0A47
    This Is the three-byte address of the start date of the security files.
    (Should be the Same as found by method a).


    The first sector Displayed is a header. Scroll to the next sector, this
    contains the first two security entries - the first bytes are the hex 7F
    first entry, the second 7F hex bytes are the second entry. Scrolling to the
    give third sector with next and fourth entries etc..


    Write down the first sixteen bytes (address 0000 to 000F) of the top
    line and split as below:


    XX | XX XXXXXXXX XXXXXX | XXXX | XX XXXXXX | XX
    | ID | | PASS |


    The ID and password are as above, but encoded.


    To Obtain the ID, you must subtract, byte for byte The following constants:
    B9 0A 32 16 8C 59 A3 7E


    No carry to or from adjoining Any bytes is necessary. Where the value to be
    subtracted from the constant is less than, then add 100 subtract the hex
    constant, eg:


    01 | 7E 16 EC E3 EF 7D 99 BE | 48 F6 | 0D FROM EC E3 | C3
    | 32 0A B9 16 7E 8C 59 A3 | | |


    Byte 1: Gives 16 but add 100 116
    32 to 32 -
    - -
    E4-E4


    Byte 2: EC
    0A-
    -
    E2


    Etc. etc..
    Since my machine is in 5362 I do not have to MSP button to find the starting
    # SECUID0 sector of the file. However, During the previous Attempts Have Been
    looking (staring) at this file. There are two other methods to find the
    start of this file:


    1. The table of contents can be found near the beginning of the hard disk.
    Using PATCH F1 1965 I Found That sector is the lowest Accessible sector.
    Browsing through the next sectors to the TOC is raised easily recognized. Michael is
    absolutely right about: "you find '*. SECUID0 F1'. At displacement hex 27
    Into this entry is the three-byte address of the start of the security files
    date. "I found the address 01 09 B6.


    2. CATALOG Using the procedures, it is possible to list the contents of the
    hard disk, sorted on location. With this list I found two libraries, with the
    # SECUID0 system files in between. A different procedures (do not remember right
    now) can be used to list the properties of the two libraries, Including the
    Starting sector addresses. Again, F1 can be used to PATCH browse through the
    sectors to look for the files # SECUID0, Which is Easily Recognized (sector is
    Completely filled with date).


    Also Michael is right about the constant B9 0A 32 16 8C 59 A3 7E, which effectively has
    subtracted from the username to be given. The position of the username and
    Also passwords are correct. After subtraction, an EBCDIC code table can be
    used to decode the username.


    Well, finally the password. In fact, the password is encrypted using two
    subtractions: one based on the middle four characters of the 8 character
    password. The second is a constant value subtration, but not the one
    According to Michael. I found the constant is 16 8C B9 59.


    So for example:


    encrypted username: CB 9B 06 F9 BE 51 32 E3
    subtraction: 0A B9 32 16 8C 59 A3 7E
    -----------------------
    result: C1 D4 E2 E3 40 40 D9 C5
    readable (EBCDIC): M A S T E R


    use encrypted decrypted use
    username: username:
    encrypted password: 6D 28 28 F3 C0 C0 F3 6D
    subtr. Part of username: 9B F9 51 32 D9 C5 E2 E3
    ----------- -----------
    result: 8D 3B 46 10 FA 6F FB 94
    subtract constant: B9 16 8C 59 72 2C 18 B2
    ----------- -----------
    result: D4 D4 E4 E4 E3 E2 E3 E2
    readable (EBCDIC): MUTSMUTS


    ==========


    The user-id and password S/34 Were "encrypted" with a simple XOR Against
    x'FF '- ie, all the bits Were reversed.


    Since it sounds like you have a known userid / password, here is one simple
    Way to do it:


    - Sign on with Any known userid / password
    - Run the CATALOG to ALL, F1
    - Find the entry for # SECUR0 (or something like that ...) and notes the
    starting disk block location
    - Convert the disk block location to a sector number by Multiplying
    by 10 and adding 1 - this amounts to just tacking to 1 to the end
    - Convert the sector number to hexadecimal
    - Run DISK DUMP, CRT
    - Change the sector number (at the top of the display), press Enter


    You Should now be looking at the first sector in the security file. On the
    S/34, only one master security officer was allowed (unlike the S/36) and it
    was always the first entry - at least in my experience.


    There are multiple users per sector - I do not remember if it is 2 or 4 -
    Each was but Either 64 or 128 bytes. Take the first 13 bytes and reverse
    the bits of each. If you have a calculator Which just does logic functions
    give it to XOR x'FF Against 'For Each byte, and look up the result in an EBCDIC
    table.


    The first 13 bytes have the user-id, the password, and a 1-byte code for the
    type of user-id (eg the master security officers, system operators, etc.).


    I do not remember if the code is before the name / password or after it, but it
    Obvious will be at this point. Then just sign on with the master security
    Officer name / password Thus Obtained uso SECEDIT to change other security
    values.


    If you do not have a name known / password combo, but the above Still Applies
    You Need to use Alter / Display to look at the VTOC to find the security files
    CATALOG instead of a listing. In the '70s I had the VTOC sector number and
    Could walk layout memorized and up to a powered off and S/34 Which Was
    sign-on as the master security officer in under 2 minutes (by bypassing the
    hardware checks).


    Doug


    ==========
    In my machine the CE panel is far simpler, so we follow the second slightly more complicated procedure by first turning the key to SERVICE, select function 7 (Console Alter/Display) and press START FUNCTION to bring up the utilities on the console. I have yet to find documentation on these menus on bitsavers so outside of the instructions above I'm walking blind.

    A nice man offered me a javascript file that would do the decryption process automagically, however currently there's a typo somewhere I can't see and does not properly work. Who is interested at taking a whack at debugging some javascript?

    Code:
    <html>
    <head>
    <script type="text/javascript">
    function h2d(h) { return parseInt(h,16); }
    function d2h(d) { return d.toString(16); }
    function decodeUsername(form) {
    	var SUV = new Array();
    	SUV[1]=h2d('32');
    	SUV[2]=h2d('0A');
    	SUV[3]=h2d('B9');
    	SUV[4]=h2d('16');
    	SUV[5]=h2d('8C');
    	SUV[6]=h2d('59');
    	SUV[7]=h2d('7E');
    	SUV[8]=h2d('A3');
    
    	var PWD = new Array();
    	var Ldecoded = 0;
    
    	form.sectorContents.value = form.sectorContents.value.split(' ').join('');
            form.out.value = '';
    	for (var i=1;i<9;i++){
    		var LByte = form.sectorContents.value.slice(i*2,i*2+2);
    		if (i >=3 && i<=6) {
    			PWD[i-3] = h2d(LByte);
    		}
    		if (h2d(LByte) >= SUV[i]) {
    			Ldecoded = d2h(h2d(LByte) - SUV[i]);
    		} else {
    			Ldecoded = d2h((h2d(LByte)+h2d('100')) - SUV[i]);
    		}
    		form.out.value += h2e(Ldecoded);
    	}
    	form.out.value += ' / ';
    
    	var SPV = new Array();
    	SPV[0] = h2d("B9");
    	SPV[1] = h2d("16");
    	SPV[2] = h2d("8C");
    	SPV[3] = h2d("59");
    	for (i=11;i < 15;i++) {
    		LByte = form.sectorContents.value.slice(i*2,i*2+2);
    		if (h2d(LByte) >= PWD[i-11]) {
    			Ldecoded = h2d(LByte) - PWD[i-11];
    		} else {
    			Ldecoded = h2d(LByte)+h2d('100') - PWD[i-11];
    		}
    		if (Ldecoded >= h2d(SPV[i-11])) {
    			Ldecoded = Ldecoded - SPV[i-11];
    		} else {
    			Ldecoded = Ldecoded+h2d('100') - SPV[i-11];
    		}
    		form.out.value += h2e(d2h(Ldecoded));
    	}
    }
    function h2e(hexbyte) {
    ebcdic = '.';
    switch(hexbyte.toUpperCase()) {
    	case '00': ebcdic = '<NUL>'; break;
    	case '01': ebcdic = '<SOH>'; break;
    	case '02': ebcdic = '<STX>'; break;
    	case '03': ebcdic = '<ETX>'; break;
    	case '04': ebcdic = '<SEL>'; break;
    	case '05': ebcdic = '<HT>' ; break;
    	case '06': ebcdic = '<RNL>'; break;
    	case '07': ebcdic = '<DEL>'; break;
    	case '08': ebcdic = '<GE>' ; break;
    	case '09': ebcdic = '<SPS>'; break;
    	case '0A': ebcdic = '<RPT>'; break;
    	case '0B': ebcdic = '<VT>' ; break;
    	case '0C': ebcdic = '<FF>' ; break;
    	case '0D': ebcdic = chr(13); break;
    	case '0E': ebcdic = '<SO>' ; break;
    	case '0F': ebcdic = '<SI>' ; break;
    	case '10': ebcdic = '<DLE>'; break;
    	case '11': ebcdic = '<DC1>'; break;
    	case '12': ebcdic = '<DC2>'; break;
    	case '13': ebcdic = '<DC3>'; break;
    	case '14': ebcdic = '<RES/ENP>'; break;
    	case '15': ebcdic = '<NL>' ; break;
    	case '16': ebcdic = '<BS>' ; break;
    	case '17': ebcdic = '<POC>'; break;
    	case '18': ebcdic = '<CAN>'; break;
    	case '19': ebcdic = '<EM>' ; break;
    	case '1A': ebcdic = '<UBS>'; break;
    	case '1B': ebcdic = '<CU1>'; break;
    	case '1C': ebcdic = '<IFS>'; break;
    	case '1D': ebcdic = '<IGS>' ; break;
    	case '1E': ebcdic = '<IRS>'; break;
    	case '1F': ebcdic = '<ITB/IUS>'; break;
    	case '20': ebcdic = '<DS>' ; break;
    	case '21': ebcdic = '<SOS>'; break;
    	case '22': ebcdic = '<FS>' ; break;
    	case '23': ebcdic = '<WUS>'; break;
    	case '24': ebcdic = '<BYP/INP>'; break;
    	case '25': ebcdic = '<LF>' ; break;
    	case '26': ebcdic = '<ETB>'; break;
    	case '27': ebcdic = '<ESC>'; break;
    	case '28': ebcdic = '<SA>' ; break;
    	case '29': ebcdic = '<SFE>'; break;
    	case '2A': ebcdic = '<SM/SW>'; break;
    	case '2B': ebcdic = '<CSP>'; break;
    	case '2C': ebcdic = '<MFA>'; break;
    	case '2D': ebcdic = '<ENQ>'; break;
    	case '2E': ebcdic = '<ACK>'; break;
    	case '2F': ebcdic = '<BEL>'; break;
    	case '30': break;
    	case '31': break;
    	case '32': ebcdic = '<SYN>'; break;
    	case '33': ebcdic = '<IR>' ; break;
    	case '34': ebcdic = '<PP>' ; break;
    	case '35': ebcdic = '<TRN>'; break;
    	case '36': ebcdic = '<NBS>'; break;
    	case '37': ebcdic = '<EOT>'; break;
    	case '38': ebcdic = '<SBS>'; break;
    	case '39': ebcdic = '<IT>' ; break;
    	case '3A': ebcdic = '<RFF>'; break;
    	case '3B': ebcdic = '<CU3>'; break;
    	case '3C': ebcdic = '<DC4>'; break;
    	case '3D': ebcdic = '<NAK>'; break;
    	case '3E': break;
    	case '3F': ebcdic = '<SUB>'; break;
    	case '40': ebcdic = ' ' ; break;
    	case '41': ebcdic = '<RSP>'; break;
    	case '42': break;
    	case '43': break;
    	case '44': break;
    	case '45': break;
    	case '46': break;
    	case '47': break;
    	case '48': break;
    	case '49': break;
    	case '4A': ebcdic = '['; break;
    	case '4B': ebcdic = '.'; break;
    	case '4C': ebcdic = '<'; break;
    	case '4D': ebcdic = '('; break;
    	case '4E': ebcdic = '+'; break;
    	case '4F': ebcdic = '|'; break;
    	case '50': ebcdic = '&'; break;
    	case '51': break;
    	case '52': break;
    	case '53': break;
    	case '54': break;
    	case '55': break;
    	case '56': break;
    	case '57': break;
    	case '58': break;
    	case '59': break;
    	case '5A': ebcdic = '!'; break;
    	case '5B': ebcdic = '$'; break;
    	case '5C': ebcdic = '*'; break;
    	case '5D': ebcdic = ')'; break;
    	case '5E': ebcdic = ';'; break;
    	case '5F': ebcdic = '^'; break;
    	case '60': ebcdic = '_'; break;
    	case '61': ebcdic = '/'; break;
    	case '62': break;
    	case '63': break;
    	case '64': break;
    	case '65': break;
    	case '66': break;
    	case '67': break;
    	case '68': break;
    	case '69': break;
    	case '6A': ebcdic = '|'; break;
    	case '6B': ebcdic = ','; break;
    	case '6C': ebcdic = '%'; break;
    	case '6D': ebcdic = '_'; break;
    	case '6E': ebcdic = '>'; break;
    	case '6F': ebcdic = '?'; break;
    	case '70': break;
    	case '71': break;
    	case '72': break;
    	case '73': break;
    	case '74': break;
    	case '75': break;
    	case '76': break;
    	case '77': break;
    	case '78': break;
    	case '79': ebcdic = '`'; break;
    	case '7A': ebcdic = ':'; break;
    	case '7B': ebcdic = '#'; break;
    	case '7C': ebcdic = '@'; break;
    	case '7D': ebcdic = "'"; break;
    	case '7E': ebcdic = '='; break;
    	case '7F': ebcdic = '"'; break;
    	case '80': break;
    	case '81': ebcdic = 'a'; break;
    	case '82': ebcdic = 'b'; break;
    	case '83': ebcdic = 'c'; break;
    	case '84': ebcdic = 'd'; break;
    	case '85': ebcdic = 'e'; break;
    	case '86': ebcdic = 'f'; break;
    	case '87': ebcdic = 'g'; break;
    	case '88': ebcdic = 'h'; break;
    	case '89': ebcdic = 'i'; break;
    	case '8A': break;
    	case '8B': ebcdic = '{'; break;
    	case '8C': break;
    	case '8D': break;
    	case '8E': break;
    	case '8F': ebcdic = '+'; break;
    	case '90': break;
    	case '91': ebcdic = 'j'; break;
    	case '92': ebcdic = 'k'; break;
    	case '93': ebcdic = 'l'; break;
    	case '94': ebcdic = 'm'; break;
    	case '95': ebcdic = 'n'; break;
    	case '96': ebcdic = 'o'; break;
    	case '97': ebcdic = 'p'; break;
    	case '98': ebcdic = 'q'; break;
    	case '99': ebcdic = 'r'; break;
    	case '9A': break;
    	case '9B': ebcdic = '}'; break;
    	case '9C': break;
    	case '9D': break;
    	case '9E': break;
    	case '9F': break;
    	case 'A0': break;
    	case 'A1': ebcdic = '~'; break;
    	case 'A2': ebcdic = 's'; break;
    	case 'A3': ebcdic = 't'; break;
    	case 'A4': ebcdic = 'u'; break;
    	case 'A5': ebcdic = 'v'; break;
    	case 'A6': ebcdic = 'w'; break;
    	case 'A7': ebcdic = 'x'; break;
    	case 'A8': ebcdic = 'y'; break;
    	case 'A9': ebcdic = 'z'; break;
    	case 'AA': break;
    	case 'AB': break;
    	case 'AC': break;
    	case 'AD': ebcdic = '['; break;
    	case 'AE': break;
    	case 'AF': break;
    	case 'B0': break;
    	case 'B1': break;
    	case 'B2': break;
    	case 'B3': break;
    	case 'B4': break;
    	case 'B5': break;
    	case 'B6': break;
    	case 'B7': break;
    	case 'B8': break;
    	case 'B9': break;
    	case 'BA': break;
    	case 'BB': break;
    	case 'BC': break;
    	case 'BD': break;
    	case 'BE': break;
    	case 'BF': break;
    	case 'C0': ebcdic = '{'; break;
    	case 'C1': ebcdic = 'A'; break;
    	case 'C2': ebcdic = 'B'; break;
    	case 'C3': ebcdic = 'C'; break;
    	case 'C4': ebcdic = 'D'; break;
    	case 'C5': ebcdic = 'E'; break;
    	case 'C6': ebcdic = 'F'; break;
    	case 'C7': ebcdic = 'G'; break;
    	case 'C8': ebcdic = 'H'; break;
    	case 'C9': ebcdic = 'I'; break;
    	case 'CA': break;
    	case 'CB': break;
    	case 'CC': break;
    	case 'CD': break;
    	case 'CE': break;
    	case 'CF': break;
    	case 'D0': ebcdic = '}'; break;
    	case 'D1': ebcdic = 'J'; break;
    	case 'D2': ebcdic = 'K'; break;
    	case 'D3': ebcdic = 'L'; break;
    	case 'D4': ebcdic = 'M'; break;
    	case 'D5': ebcdic = 'N'; break;
    	case 'D6': ebcdic = 'O'; break;
    	case 'D7': ebcdic = 'P'; break;
    	case 'D8': ebcdic = 'Q'; break;
    	case 'D9': ebcdic = 'R'; break;
    	case 'DA': break;
    	case 'DB': break;
    	case 'DC': break;
    	case 'DD': break;
    	case 'DE': break;
    	case 'DF': break;
    	case 'E0': ebcdic = '\\'; break;
    	case 'E1': break;
    	case 'E2': ebcdic = 'S'; break;
    	case 'E3': ebcdic = 'T'; break;
    	case 'E4': ebcdic = 'U'; break;
    	case 'E5': ebcdic = 'V'; break;
    	case 'E6': ebcdic = 'W'; break;
    	case 'E7': ebcdic = 'X'; break;
    	case 'E8': ebcdic = 'Y'; break;
    	case 'E9': ebcdic = 'Z'; break;
    	case 'EA': break;
    	case 'EB': break;
    	case 'EC': break;
    	case 'ED': break;
    	case 'EE': break;
    	case 'EF': break;
    	case 'F0': ebcdic = '0'; break;
    	case 'F1': ebcdic = '1'; break;
    	case 'F2': ebcdic = '2'; break;
    	case 'F3': ebcdic = '3'; break;
    	case 'F4': ebcdic = '4'; break;
    	case 'F5': ebcdic = '5'; break;
    	case 'F6': ebcdic = '6'; break;
    	case 'F7': ebcdic = '7'; break;
    	case 'F8': ebcdic = '8'; break;
    	case 'F9': ebcdic = '9'; break;
    	case 'FA': break;
    	case 'FB': break;
    	case 'FC': break;
    	case 'FD': break;
    	case 'FE': break;
    	case 'FF': break;
    	default : ebcdic = '<<UNHANDLED CODE>>'; break;
    	}
    return ebcdic;
    }
    </script>
    </head>
    <form>
    IBM System/36 sector:<br><input name=sectorContents type="text" size=48 maxlength=48 onChange="decodeUsername(this.form)">
    <input onclick="decodeUsername(this.form)" value="decode" type="button" /> 
    <br>
    <textarea name=out nowrap rows=1 cols=30 style="font-family:Courier;font-size:16px"></textarea>
    </form>
    </html>
    = Excellent space heater

  6. #6

    Default

    The RICM has a bootable 5263, also without the IDs/passwords. http://www.ricomputermuseum.org/Home...-5263-system36
    Once you figure out the procedure to determine the passwords we will also give it a try.
    Member of the Rhode Island Computer Museum
    http://www.ricomputermuseum.org

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Kamloops, BC, Canada
    Posts
    5,342
    Blog Entries
    41

    Default

    The replacement key someone made up on a hunch failed to even fit in the keylock. I had no choice but to move to Plan B: drill out the lock core.


    http://i11.photobucket.com/albums/a1...d/CGS_7917.jpg

    This required putting the keyswitch in a vice and carefully attacking it with several different sized drill bits until I could release and pull out the pins. Then using a screwdriver and hammer collapse inward one side of the weakened core until the circlip was visible, then pull that out to release the core. With the core removed I could see the little D-shaped plastic knob that links the lock to the switch. Rotate that 180 degrees clockwise and bam, you are in the SERVICE position.


    http://i11.photobucket.com/albums/a1...d/CGS_7918.jpg

    So now that we have completed the hardware side of the hacking lets move to the software side and get that password!


    Also I cleaned up one of the 5251 terminals that came with this machine. Again, lots of degreasing, IBM's famous nasty brown foam and there was a fan that needed to be replaced. I sourced one from our friends at The Hackery. I do really live the clamshell way the terminal opens.



    http://i11.photobucket.com/albums/a1...d/CGS_7912.jpg


    http://i11.photobucket.com/albums/a1...d/CGS_7911.jpg


    http://i11.photobucket.com/albums/a1...d/CGS_7913.jpg

    It even came up first try! The screen is decently bright considering the burn-in and the self-test seems to pass but yeah, no keyboard. :/


    http://i11.photobucket.com/albums/a1...d/CGS_7914.jpg
    = Excellent space heater

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2015
    Location
    Inside an MRI
    Posts
    1,097

    Default

    I'm glad that you got this and am thoroughly enjoying this thread.

    I was sorely tempted, having messed about with as/400 stuff, but between lack of space and the hernia surgery, it was never going to happen.

    Are you familiar with the midrange-L mailing list? It's primarily people running current midrange systems in production environments, but the folks there have been known to be kind to the occasional hobbyist.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Kamloops, BC, Canada
    Posts
    5,342
    Blog Entries
    41

    Default

    I have never heard of that list before. How hard are they to get in touch with?

    In the meantime...well, some of the meantime I've been trying to get my head around the service menu. I still have no documentation or idea of syntax here so over the last few weeks I have been completely unable to proceed anywhere. Sorry to ask for someone to hold my hand but I need real help here because I have no idea what I am doing.
    = Excellent space heater

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug 2015
    Location
    Inside an MRI
    Posts
    1,097

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