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Thread: clearly this is a hoax

  1. #1

    Default clearly this is a hoax

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Gds2ymjSgmo

    The mainboard is nearly a dead ringer for an early revision AT (or in actuality a close clone). Not exactly the same, but too close to ignore. The 80186 and 80286 have the same number of pins. But I'm sure that's where the similarity ends. i.e an 80186 can't be dropped into an 80286 socket and everythings hunky dory. If you watch the video some, you'll even see the board is occupied by an 80287-4 I believe. I don't have a PGA 80186 otherwise I'd be fool enough to try it (I once again have an early revision AT mobo, my fave).

  2. #2

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    First board as far as I can see is made by CSS Laboratories (see near ISA slots), with chip date codes of '85. I think it's very unlikely to be based on the 80186. All the large DIPs on the left presumably form the chip set consisting of the 8259A, 8237A etc. The 80186 has a lot of the chipset integrated into it, though I think it has to be re-implemented to be PC compatible. Still either way, probably a 286 board.

    The other one I have no idea about.
    Looking for: OMTI SMS Scientific Micro Systems 8610 or 8627 ESDI ISA drive controller, May also be branded Core HC, Please PM me if you want to part with one.

  3. #3
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    Durango's "Poppy" PC (the second board isn't it--too late; looks to be about 1986) used both 186 and 286 on the same board. The 286 was an option, with the 186 doing I/O for it. It could run Xenix.

    The development for the 186 and 286 happened at the same time--they were different projects. The 286 was released a bit later than the 186 mostly because it had more bugs in the pre-production silicon. Durango had the board in production before the official release of the 286.

    The 186, I believe was not intended as a true successor to the 8086, but rather to serve as the hub of an embedded system.

  4. #4
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    Why would it be a hoax? It's boards with an 80186 on them... Is there some big reason for someone to fake this?

  5. #5
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    The first board looks a bit suspicious, not because of the 8237 DMA controllers (it is possible to interface 8086-type peripherals to the 80186), but because the 40 pin DIP socket appears to have an 80287 in it.

    The 80187 was the correct NDP for the 80186, but it came out very late around 1989, so this board wouldn't use it. Before that, the NDP chip of choice was the 8087, not the 80287.

    The 80186 is not plug-compatible with the 80286.

  6. #6

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    Bear in mind there was at least 1 true (?) 80186 fully pc compatible motherboard produced, though likely a pc/xt form factor. This thing just looks so much like a clones AT. For now I just ain't buying it.

  7. #7

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    If that first board was real, it would be the world's first and only PC AT-architecture board with 16-bit ISA slots to use anything less than a 286.

    Certainly an 80186 can have a 16-bit external data bus, just like the 8086, but I've never heard of any having AT-standard 16-bit ISA slots; they always used some kind of proprietary interface.

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