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Thread: 386 verssion of Poqet PC

  1. #1
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    Default 386 verssion of Poqet PC

    Are there any 286 386 486 equivelants of the Poqet PC or HP 100LX?
    Wanted: Any old clunky 286-P1 machine that has some kind of working battery or replaceable with off the shelf parts. Preferred: 10+lbs 386 machines.

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    http://www.tankraider.com/DOSPALMTOP/list.html has the best list of all similarly sized systems. Tidalwave 386 and IBM Palm Top PC 110 (uses a 486) jump out at me. A few systems used AMD ELAN which would be a 486 derivative.

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    Mentioned but not pictured are the Gateway HandBook (286, original model) and the HandBook 486 (SX25 to DX50 IIRC). I've got the 286 model as well as one of the 486es (forget which one). Both are usable machines, the keyboards are nearly full-size.

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    Are you sure the Handbook was a 286? Most of the information I have was that it used the Chips & Technologies F8680, equivalent to a 286-12 for performance with built-in doubled CGA graphics and EMS support but unable to use protected mode. Instruction set for the F8680 is the 8086 with a few new instructions. IO design is based on the XT bus. F8680 based systems were common in this form factor.

    The Bicom 260i was a subnotebook using a 286. 286s were poor choices because they lacked the improved power management of later designs or the tiny power draw of some of the 8086 variants.

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    Quote Originally Posted by krebizfan View Post
    Are you sure the Handbook was a 286? Most of the information I have was that it used the Chips & Technologies F8680, equivalent to a 286-12 for performance with built-in doubled CGA graphics and EMS support but unable to use protected mode. Instruction set for the F8680 is the 8086 with a few new instructions. IO design is based on the XT bus. F8680 based systems were common in this form factor.
    You're probably right about that. The literature I remember promotes the "it's a 286!" idea but IIRC it *is* a C&T CPU.

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    The Gateway Handbook was advertised as having "286-class performance":

    https://books.google.com/books?id=el...epage&q&f=true

    Since it has the 80186 instruction set, it should run most 286 real-mode software, just like the NEC V20/V30/V40 chips.

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