Image Map Image Map
Results 1 to 8 of 8

Thread: There ARE still bargains to be had - great haul this morning

  1. #1

    Default There ARE still bargains to be had - great haul this morning

    Just when it looked like the carefree days of picking up lots of vintage equipment for next to nothing are well and truly over, I just picked up a great haul of components from a car boot sale this morning:


    IDE Zip drive
    IDE CD ROM Drive
    4 x 1.44MB 3.5" floppy drives
    8 x IDE hard drives all made in the 90's of varying capacities (640MB, 2.1GB, 3 x 3.2GB, 4.3GB, 2 x 8.4GB)

    £10 for the whole lot!

    Not quite as exciting as when you could come back with a boxed vintage system for the same money, but still a lot of useful components that will come in handy (assuming they work anyway). I've already earmarked uses for several of the hard drives to upgrade older systems whilst keeping them period correct. One of the floppy drives came with a bonus random unlabelled disk which does still read (but turned out just to be a driver for a RAID card).

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Connecticut, USA
    Posts
    1,487

    Default

    good job. That meminds me I should get my zip drive fired up... one of them anyway.

  3. #3

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by VERAULT View Post
    good job. That meminds me I should get my zip drive fired up... one of them anyway.
    I've got an early USB one (the one with the separate power brick that looks the same as a parallel port drive) which I've had from new. Don't know where the disks for it went though. Somehow the USB version did work with NT4 and the original version of Windows 95 through some custom-written USB support drivers for these operating systems. Surprised more manufacturers weren't able to do that.

    I've been on the lookout for a parallel port drive to assist with old machines (read about an 8088-compatible DOS driver) but an IDE one is a nice halfway house.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Location
    Québec, Canada
    Posts
    254

    Default

    The most valuable things you picked up are the disk and the hard drives. If you think the files on them are useless, well this is exactly how you bring something into extinction that someone in the future would have loved to own. Perhaps one of the hard drives you picked up contains the last remaining copy of an obscure video game someone played in the past, perhaps someone owns the last Xbrand RAID card in existence and they would love to have those drivers you found on that disk...
    • The only computer from my childhood that I'm missing is an Olivetti M380-40... Please help me find a solution to this problem
    • Looking for pictures of the following Olivetti computers: M380 W, M380 XP4, M400-60, M480... Complete list: http://pastebin.ca/3629976

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Ohio/USA
    Posts
    6,917
    Blog Entries
    2

    Default

    The days of picking up "vintage" machines for free/cheap are over (unless a collector dies and they need to clear out the house fast to sell it).

    The free on the curb items are probably dual core systems these days, not exactly vintage.

    IDE stuff is getting trashed because everybody is use SATA drives or SSD devices with IDE adapters. Soon IDE drives of low capacity will be collectable so hold onto them.

    I have a few IDE ZIP drives (mostly in macs) but the ones I like are the SCSI external ones.
    What I collect: 68K/Early PPC Mac, DOS/Win 3.1 era machines, Amiga/ST, C64/128
    Nubus/ISA/VLB/MCA/EISA cards of all types
    Boxed apps and games for the above systems
    Analog video capture cards/software and complete systems

  6. #6

    Default

    The deals are definitely still out there, if you know where to look (or people know where to look for you). I keep an eye out at the MIT Swapfest and other places. I've managed some pretty darn good scores in the past couple of years, most notably a pair of original Macintosh 128Ks (one non-working) for a total of $120. One has the original Apple carrying case, the other has an aftermarket "MacBag". Here's a picture of the working one:


    Sometimes, people seek me out at these places, or places I go to save stuff that they get in for me. At a local store, I've found a fair amount of good deals on stuff, including a trio of boxed Timex-Sinclair TS1000s, which I got for $60 (with a John Bell Engineering 6502 board thrown in). At one of the swapfests, a friend of mine who was moving just plain gave me a Commodore/MOS KIM-1 in somewhat rough shape. Here's a picture of it:


    Just this past weekend, I set up a deal with a local collector to sell me a pair of classic luggables, a Nixdorf PC-02 (aka Panasonic Senior Partner) and an Osborne 1 with manuals. Originally, I was going to pay him $100 at a local hamfest; however, when he heard that I'd bought an oddball/rare Bearcat DX-1000 shortwave radio at the show, he offered to trade me the luggables and $50 for the radio. After some deliberation, I agreed; since I'd paid $50 for the DX-1000, it was like I was getting the luggables for free! Here's a picture of the dynamic duo:

  7. #7

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Unknown_K
    The days of picking up "vintage" machines for free/cheap are over (unless a collector dies and they need to clear out the house fast to sell it).
    They're certainly generally over in terms of being able to reliably source lots of vintage stuff (or 'junk' as it was termed at the time) for free/next to free. But there are still gems out there owned by people with no idea of their worth. In my collection is a boxed Spectrum +2A, in the mintest of mint condition. Has the original sales receipt from 1989, the plastic wrappers are in such good condition that there is even still some stickiness on the tape that once sealed them. And the manual looks like it was printed yesterday. I noticed it about 3 years ago in my parent's attic - stood out like a sore thumb as this isn't something I ever had when I was younger.

    Turns out my dad was given it a few months previously by a workmate who was throwing it out as old junk. It was originally bought for his daughter who barely used it and it was dumped in the attic at less than a year old and left there for 25 years. My dad in turn had tried selling it for £5 at a car boot sale and there were no takers for what would be the deal of the century for a vintage computer collector. Now it's mine - for free.

    Quote Originally Posted by Unknown_K
    The free on the curb items are probably dual core systems these days, not exactly vintage.
    Which is probably why we should be stocking up on such systems right now whilst they are available in abundance for next to no money. The lack of monetary worth and the ease with which vintage computers could be sourced 15-20 years ago is precisely because at that time they were simply viewed as outdated junk which was 10 a penny. Now they're desirable and collectable there are hardly any left and despite my paragraph above most people in possession of them are either collectors who cherish them and won't let them go or people who know the value of what they have and are looking to make a healthy profit.

    Even things like generic beige box machines from the late 90's/early 2000's have soared in value in recent years.

    Whilst some bland HP/Dell Core 2 Duo desktop from 2008 with accompanying 1280x1024 LCD monitor probably isn't something to deserve a place in your retro setup right now, it's certainly something to put on the shelf for posterity and be glad you own in 10-20 years when they start changing hands on ebay for a small fortune. I kick myself at the things I once owned for peanuts or less which I no longer do and would now need to spend serious time and money on if I want to get them back.

    Quote Originally Posted by 6885P5H
    The most valuable things you picked up are the disk and the hard drives. If you think the files on them are useless, well this is exactly how you bring something into extinction that someone in the future would have loved to own. Perhaps one of the hard drives you picked up contains the last remaining copy of an obscure video game someone played in the past, perhaps someone owns the last Xbrand RAID card in existence and they would love to have those drivers you found on that disk...
    Dealing with that, I will keep what's on the floppy disk and I'm working through the hard drives. Some are FAT32 and empty, several are NTFS formatted but the only EIDE boxes I have running atm are a Windows 95 and a Windows 98SE machine. Going to put NTFS for Win98 on one of them to look through the NTFS drives.

    There were a couple of drives that had intriguing (and scary) content on them. The software was unremarkable - just Windows 98 with Office 2000, so nothing amazing there. But they had come from a solicitors office and the My Documents folders on them contained hundreds of letters to clients about their personal cases. I then chucked the drives in as the boot device and they did manage to boot into safe mode, from where I then found that Outlook Express was being used as the email client and all the emails in/out of the office were there too! All from about 2002/2003 but still scary that a legal firm could allow data like that to be sold in the middle of a field 15 years later. Ironically they probably thought they were doing the right thing by pulling the drives out when the computers were decomissioned, but then failed utterly to track what happened to the hard drives after.

    This is why at my work when a computer is decommissioned the hard drive stays fitted as long as it is still inside the company as it's much easier to keep tabs on the complete machine (and what it was used for) than it is to keep track of a pile of hard disks. If we do end up transferring the machine outside of the company only at that point is the hard disk removed and taken immediately to a certified data wiping company.

    So whilst I normally do image off old hard disks in case they have any interesting software on them, in this case those two will be low level formatted and wiped.
    Last edited by cwathen; May 9th, 2018 at 11:56 AM.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Ohio/USA
    Posts
    6,917
    Blog Entries
    2

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by cwathen View Post
    They're certainly generally over in terms of being able to reliably source lots of vintage stuff (or 'junk' as it was termed at the time) for free/next to free. But there are still gems out there owned by people with no idea of their worth. In my collection is a boxed Spectrum +2A, in the mintest of mint condition. Has the original sales receipt from 1989, the plastic wrappers are in such good condition that there is even still some stickiness on the tape that once sealed them. And the manual looks like it was printed yesterday. I noticed it about 3 years ago in my parent's attic - stood out like a sore thumb as this isn't something I ever had when I was younger.

    Turns out my dad was given it a few months previously by a workmate who was throwing it out as old junk. It was originally bought for his daughter who barely used it and it was dumped in the attic at less than a year old and left there for 25 years. My dad in turn had tried selling it for £5 at a car boot sale and there were no takers for what would be the deal of the century for a vintage computer collector. Now it's mine - for free.


    Which is probably why we should be stocking up on such systems right now whilst they are available in abundance for next to no money. The lack of monetary worth and the ease with which vintage computers could be sourced 15-20 years ago is precisely because at that time they were simply viewed as outdated junk which was 10 a penny. Now they're desirable and collectable there are hardly any left and despite my paragraph above most people in possession of them are either collectors who cherish them and won't let them go or people who know the value of what they have and are looking to make a healthy profit.

    Even things like generic beige box machines from the late 90's/early 2000's have soared in value in recent years.
    I had no problem a dozen years ago offering $10 to a reseller who had a IIgs system with a Transwarp inside somebody dropped off as scrap because it wasn't worth much at the time and was literally going to get junked in a minute. Offering somebody $10 now for the same thing when you can sell it for $400 any given day seems kind of a shitty thing to do. I did quite well over the years collecting things other people just wanted gone (68k/ppc mac, 286-PPro PC, 8 bith commodore/atari, Amiga etc) that were in my collecting interests. The thing is those interests have a starting point and it seems an ending point. I will be 50 years old in July and collecting core2 machines just isn't something I want to do even if they might be worth something in 20 years (assuming I am even around at that point). Prices have soared because new people are coming into the hobby and older equipment is either in collections/hoarded or scrapped.

    Beige cases which are period correct and are in good condition are getting harder to find so people will send a few bucks for them.
    What I collect: 68K/Early PPC Mac, DOS/Win 3.1 era machines, Amiga/ST, C64/128
    Nubus/ISA/VLB/MCA/EISA cards of all types
    Boxed apps and games for the above systems
    Analog video capture cards/software and complete systems

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •