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Thread: Why so many Apple ][ with Monitor ///?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2015
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    Raleigh, NC, USA
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    Default Why so many Apple ][ with Monitor ///?

    I have one, and I've seen a lot of Apple II's for sale with an Apple Monitor III. Is it just me, or is there a reason for that?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
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    Yes. Apple overproduced Monitor ///s, and discounted them after the cancellation of the Apple ///. So lots of people bought them. Apple even made a special monitor stand to accommodate this.

    I sold a bunch of Monitor ///s a while back after deciding I'd never own an apple ///. Now I own a /// and don't have a matching monitor.

  3. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by KC9UDX View Post
    Now I own a /// and don't have a matching monitor.
    On the plus side, they're pretty easy to come by. There's a couple of different possible CRT colors, and of course there's the normal dark brown vs. light tan accented one specifically targeted at the ///+.

  4. #4

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    Is the monochrome III monitor standard ntsc composite? I have 1 here, haven't plugged it in yet.

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by 2icebitn View Post
    Is the monochrome III monitor standard ntsc composite?
    Yes. It's got a very long-persistence phosphorous coating, so it's not particularly good for watching TV.

  6. #6

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    I wasn't intending to watch tv on it. Just wanted specific info. Not all composite monitors adhere to ntsc timing.

  7. #7

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    The Monitor /// predates the Monitor II by four years. For some reason, Apple took their sweet time in releasing a monitor to go with their computers. The Monitor /// was introduced in 1980 to go with the Apple ///, three years after the Apple II was released. Apple probably expected the Apple II to go away once the Apple /// was introduced, but when that happen, they caved and released a stand to allow a Monitor /// to sit on top of an Apple II. Finally, once it was clear that the Apple II series wasn't going anywhere, they finally released a series of monitors to match it, starting with the Monitor II in 1984.

    When I was a kid, we were handed down an Apple IIe and II+ by a relative; both were equipped with Monitor IIs. I'm not sure about the Monitor ///, but our Monitor II worked fine with non-Apple composite video sources I fed into it, notably a Nintendo Entertainment System (NES). The Legend of Zelda looked weird in green-screen, but it worked. The IIe is now equipped with a Color Monitor IIe, but I still have one of the Monitor IIs.
    -Adam

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by 2icebitn View Post
    Not all composite monitors adhere to ntsc timing.
    Hmmm, I've not come across one in North America that didn't. Of course, Apple II computers themselves don't adhere particularly well to NTSC... but that's the opposite problem. This monitor won't give you any NTSC composite issues besides what I already mentioned, the long-persistence phosphor.

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by david__schmidt View Post
    Hmmm, I've not come across one in North America that didn't.
    HP 98788a, 19" paper white, single bnc input. If you look at the tech manuals you'll see the video signal has an astounding resemblance to an ntsc signal. But it has 1024 lines. I figure the only way I'll ever get to use it (apart from the HP worstation) is to find out where the individual sync pulses are extracted from the input signal.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
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    Northfield, MN USA
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    "HP worstation"

    Heh - I like that. I've had a few "worse stations" in my life as well

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