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Thread: So, it turns out that I'm hot garbage at desoldering

  1. #21
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    At this rate, we might as well just suspend the boards upside-down in a toaster oven and leave it sitting on top the wash machine for a cycle!

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by 1944GPW View Post
    I used to desolder bulk components in quantity from old boards by heating the back with a propane gas torch then whacking the board (pretty hard) over the side of my box trailer, out in the yard. Most of the parts would stay in the trailer but the occasional chip, resistor or whatever would fly out onto the lawn somewhere. The ones I didn't find probably got eaten by the lawn mower. It's definately a super-fast large-scale way of clearing boards but only do it outside as the pcb's can start to burn quickly, and no need for me to tell you how that stinks.
    Oh and WEAR SAFETY GLASSES.
    I typically use a hot air gun applied to the solder side and a 5 gallon bucket to catch the stuff as it drops off.

    I've heard of some folks using an electric frying pan filled with peanut oil set to about 400F. (70/30 solder melts at about 370F) Just immerse the board and pick off the components. Wear gloves--and don't re-use the oil to make fried chicken.

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by smbaker View Post
    One of the best tools I ever bought was a Hakko-808 desoldering gun. I don't desolder often, but when I do it really eases the job.
    I just had to mail in my hakko FR-300 desoldering gun. I bought it mid january and it conked out on me while I was using it (heater died), I bought it from recommendations on this board when a generic chinese one I bought died in two days.
    Im dissapointed it broke but while it worked it worked beautifully. I hope they dont hassle me on getting it fixed or swapped out and I get it back soon. I use it all the time.

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by VERAULT View Post
    I just had to mail in my hakko FR-300 desoldering gun. I bought it mid january and it conked out on me while I was using it (heater died), I bought it from recommendations on this board when a generic chinese one I bought died in two days.
    Im dissapointed it broke but while it worked it worked beautifully. I hope they dont hassle me on getting it fixed or swapped out and I get it back soon. I use it all the time.
    Do you leave the thing on all day? I find my Chinese model gets to temp very quickly so I just use it when needed and then turn it off. I don't keep my soldering irons on all the time either.
    What I collect: 68K/Early PPC Mac, DOS/Win 3.1 era machines, Amiga/ST, C64/128
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  5. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chuck(G) View Post
    I typically use a hot air gun applied to the solder side and a 5 gallon bucket to catch the stuff as it drops off.

    I've heard of some folks using an electric frying pan filled with peanut oil set to about 400F. (70/30 solder melts at about 370F) Just immerse the board and pick off the components. Wear gloves--and don't re-use the oil to make fried chicken.
    If you are just going to recycle the board a hot air gun on the solder side would probably work well (and probably warp the board a bit).
    What I collect: 68K/Early PPC Mac, DOS/Win 3.1 era machines, Amiga/ST, C64/128
    Nubus/ISA/VLB/MCA/EISA cards of all types
    Boxed apps and games for the above systems
    Analog video capture cards/software and complete systems

  6. #26
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    nope not all day, but it may be on for 1-3 hours at a time.

  7. #27
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    I generally have mine going 20 minutes to an hour depending what I am doing (sometimes I let small things sit until I get enough small jobs to break out the desoldering gun).

    Heaters going out could be a sign of over voltage (check your power line) or just dialing the temp to max for no reason.
    What I collect: 68K/Early PPC Mac, DOS/Win 3.1 era machines, Amiga/ST, C64/128
    Nubus/ISA/VLB/MCA/EISA cards of all types
    Boxed apps and games for the above systems
    Analog video capture cards/software and complete systems

  8. #28

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    I have a Weller. I don't worry about it. If I remember to turn it off, it heats up pretty quick. If I forget, nothing lost.

  9. #29
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    I replaced the heater once on my Weller TCP. Given that the thing is well over 40 years old, I figure that's not too bad. What got it was the rod that activates the heater switch got stuck.

  10. #30

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    The one I have now, don't recall the model number, I bought less than five years ago. So I don't expect it to last as long as one made forty years ago. But my biased opinion is that it'll last a lot longer than a Hakko which I could've bought five years ago.

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