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Thread: MPC Myst - Any differences?

  1. #1
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    Default MPC Myst - Any differences?

    I picked this up years ago because there was a point where every second hand store had no less than two copies of Myst.
    Looks identical to the regular MYST CD case front and back, except that there's a red band across the front indicating that it's a "Special Bundle Version" (and not for resale), the same is printed on the bottom of the disc which itself is a much more vibrant blue than a regular disc, plus instead of just stating it's for Windows it states for MPC/Windows and has the Multimedia PC logo printed on the backside of the instruction booklet. Also no mention anywhere of Windows 95.


    http://i11.photobucket.com/albums/a1...d/IMG_0386.jpg

    Oddly enough, all my other copies of Myst will install and run and play under XP. This one will not. In fact it crashed under Windows 95 as well. All I can suspect is that this is a really, really old pressing of Myst.
    I understand the MPC standard was a really vague standard, but is there really anything special beyond the extra name?
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  2. #2
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    There were at least three versions of Myst for Windows: The original pressing for 3.1, a later one with the MPC branding, and an even later one that officially supported Windows 95 and later. You have the latter two in your picture. There might have been more, but I know of those three.

    The MPC version, being earlier, likely used some non-device-driver tricks (WinG) to get some additional speedup, which means it would not play nice with later operating systems. Your non-MPC version pictured in the photo states Windows 95 compatibility, which means it likely threw out all the tricks and just relied on DirectDraw, which explains why it works on later OSes.

    MPC was actually a very well-defined standard: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Multimedia_PC
    It attempted to standardize configurations into levels (level 1, level 2, etc.) so that manufacturers could build a certain set of features into a product without trying to list every single sound and graphics card necessary to run the product. It was a great idea, but had limited success. It went away when Windows 95 became common, because most systems that had a CDROM drive and could run Windows 95 already met all MPC requirements.

    Here's a video I made demonstrating what typical video and audio quality you could expect from each MPC standard, using the three most common video codecs of the time period of each standard:

    Offering a bounty for:
    - A working Sanyo MBC-775
    - Documentation and original disks for: Panasonic Sr. Partner, Zenith Z-160 series
    - Music Construction Set, IBM Music Feature edition (has red sticker on front stating IBM Music Feature)
    - Any very old/ugly IBM joystick (such as the Franklin JS-123)

  3. #3

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    I have two different MPC versions.

    The first is like the one pictured on the left in NeXT's post, the Special Bundle Version Not for resale 18207.

    The second is a Bix Box MPC/WINDOWS 3.1 version.
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  4. #4

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    @Trixter,

    I find it hilarious that you used Computer Chronicles to do a demo.

  5. #5
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    Bonus points if you recognized that all of the Computer Chronicles clips were, themselves, talking about multimedia.
    Offering a bounty for:
    - A working Sanyo MBC-775
    - Documentation and original disks for: Panasonic Sr. Partner, Zenith Z-160 series
    - Music Construction Set, IBM Music Feature edition (has red sticker on front stating IBM Music Feature)
    - Any very old/ugly IBM joystick (such as the Franklin JS-123)

  6. #6

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    The version I have is a weird hybrid. The disc says "For MPC/Windows 3.1" yet the booklet is dated 1995 and references Windows 95. This copy was purchased new in late 1995 and I'm pretty sure the box mentioned it was compatible with Windows 95, so its likely they were depleting stock of the 16-bit versions of the game. When did the "3rd" revision become available?

    Slightly offtopic: It annoyed me to no end that Myst required 256 color mode. The videos (for the in-game animated sequences) included in my copy looks vastly better in higher color modes.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by njroadfan View Post
    When did the "3rd" revision become available?
    Not my area of expertise, sorry (I only know DOS and booter games).

    Slightly offtopic: It annoyed me to no end that Myst required 256 color mode. The videos (for the in-game animated sequences) included in my copy looks vastly better in higher color modes.
    The game was originally created for 1992-era Macs and PCs, and high-color modes were not common at that time period.
    Offering a bounty for:
    - A working Sanyo MBC-775
    - Documentation and original disks for: Panasonic Sr. Partner, Zenith Z-160 series
    - Music Construction Set, IBM Music Feature edition (has red sticker on front stating IBM Music Feature)
    - Any very old/ugly IBM joystick (such as the Franklin JS-123)

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