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Thread: Intel releases new 8086 CPU!

  1. #11

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    At least the original 8086 didn't have out of order execution that is needed by both Meltdown and Spectre to be possible. As you know, Meltdown ( a problem with Intel and ARM ) was very simple coding. Spectre, which effected all chips that allowed out of order speculative execution in protected mode, would not be an issue with the 8086 either. Both also required an accurate system time counter. It seems some seem to think that making the system time counter inaccurate will fix things. People will find other ways to get timing from outside sources especially with multiple processors on the same chip.
    Dwight

  2. #12
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    I'm almost two weeks late to this party, but wanted to mention that I was stupid enough to purchase one of these - and an entire new setup. I'm having a Z370 motherboard BIOS flashed right now so I can install it (just got a text saying it's ready to pickup - yey).

    Six cores, each guaranteed to do 5Ghz stable on their own (turbo) I thought that was a nice touch, 5Mhz to 5Ghz.
    Will be interesting to see how many I can reliably get doing it together (will mostly depend on how well the cooler I purchased works).
    image (1).jpg
    Completely unnecessary, but I enjoy building new machines as much as I do fixing old ones - and this was a fantastic excuse. Thanks Intel!

    Will be selling off my i7 6700K setup for parts to recoupe some of the cost, but this new machine should last me a few years.
    Last edited by SpidersWeb; June 21st, 2018 at 06:27 PM. Reason: Image
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    Let us know how the Z370 works out.

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    I built my Z370 rig about 6 weeks ago -- so far, very happy with it. i7-8700k. And to be fair, mine's running at 4.77 GHz ;-D My only regret about the Z370 platform is that it is obviously meant for gamers -- there's just not enough lanes to do heavy I/O. I populated all three m.2 slots and when I was done I lost two SATA ports because there wasn't enough bandwidth. If I plug something into the last PCIe slot, I lose another two SATA ports. It's kind of ridiculous. But for single-task workloads doing single-task I/O, it can be nutty fast. I was encoding video from one m.2 card to a volume containing the other two m.2 cards at a speed of 3.2 GB/s (that's not a typo).

    I built it for primarily for editing 4k video, and secondarily for everything else (including gaming).
    Offering a bounty for:
    - A working Sanyo MBC-775
    - Documentation and original disks for: Panasonic Sr. Partner, Zenith Z-160 series
    - Music Construction Set, IBM Music Feature edition (has red sticker on front stating IBM Music Feature)
    - Any very old/ugly IBM joystick (such as the Franklin JS-123)

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    Quote Originally Posted by Trixter View Post
    I built my Z370 rig about 6 weeks ago -- so far, very happy with it. i7-8700k. And to be fair, mine's running at 4.77 GHz ;-D My only regret about the Z370 platform is that it is obviously meant for gamers -- there's just not enough lanes to do heavy I/O. I populated all three m.2 slots and when I was done I lost two SATA ports because there wasn't enough bandwidth. If I plug something into the last PCIe slot, I lose another two SATA ports. It's kind of ridiculous. But for single-task workloads doing single-task I/O, it can be nutty fast. I was encoding video from one m.2 card to a volume containing the other two m.2 cards at a speed of 3.2 GB/s (that's not a typo).

    I built it for primarily for editing 4k video, and secondarily for everything else (including gaming).
    What did end up with for video?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Trixter View Post
    I built my Z370 rig about 6 weeks ago -- so far, very happy with it. i7-8700k. And to be fair, mine's running at 4.77 GHz ;-D My only regret about the Z370 platform is that it is obviously meant for gamers -- there's just not enough lanes to do heavy I/O.
    Hasn't that usually been the distinction between PCs and mainframes?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Agent Orange View Post
    What did end up with for video?
    He, or me? Mine is the GTX 1070 I've had for a while. My video work could greatly benefit from a 1080 TI (I use a GPU-heavy noise reduction process) but the 1070 has been getting me through it. The 1070 can only drive older games at 4k; I have to run at 1080p for any game 3 years old or newer.

    Quote Originally Posted by Chuck(G) View Post
    Hasn't that usually been the distinction between PCs and mainframes?
    That line is blurring. The Z370 platform has 24 PCIe lanes for I/O, but the AMD platform has something like 40 which is a crazy amount of bandwidth addressable by both the CPU and all other devices in the system simultaneously.
    Offering a bounty for:
    - A working Sanyo MBC-775
    - Documentation and original disks for: Panasonic Sr. Partner, Zenith Z-160 series
    - Music Construction Set, IBM Music Feature edition (has red sticker on front stating IBM Music Feature)
    - Any very old/ugly IBM joystick (such as the Franklin JS-123)

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trixter View Post
    He, or me? Mine is the GTX 1070 I've had for a while. My video work could greatly benefit from a 1080 TI (I use a GPU-heavy noise reduction process) but the 1070 has been getting me through it. The 1070 can only drive older games at 4k; I have to run at 1080p for any game 3 years old or newer.



    That line is blurring. The Z370 platform has 24 PCIe lanes for I/O, but the AMD platform has something like 40 which is a crazy amount of bandwidth addressable by both the CPU and all other devices in the system simultaneously.
    Intel Z370 desktop has 24 PCIe lanes (so does AMD's Ryzen AM4 CPUs), Intel X299 high end desktop (HEDT) has 28 or 40 PCIe lanes depending on the CPU, AMD Threadripper (X399) HEDT has 64 PCIe lanes. Intel's high end server socket FCLGA3647 Xeons support 48 PCIe lanes per socket.

    The AMD Epyc server platform supports 128 PCIe lanes, even on a single socket. In dual socket, it uses 64 lanes from each CPU for the CPUs to communicate with each other, using the other 128 for system I/O. The Epyc Zen 2 CPUs which are in the labs now (sampling to vendors soon) will support up to 64 CPU cores, 128 threads per socket... so you could have 1 thread per PCIe lane on a single socket, or one per core in a dual socket.

    Threadripper 2 will support up to 32 cores / 64 threads, likely to see retail in August. Intel's best high end desktop CPU right now tops out at 18 cores, they have 28 core Xeons, but they start at $8000 and go up from there.... AMD selling a 32 core CPU likely around the $1500 price point is going to be a huge challenge for Intel.

    Threadripper / Epyc use smaller CPU modules glued together by infinity fabric, letting them maximize yields by keeping the die size smaller. Intel's HEDT and Xeon high core count CPUs have huge die sizes, reducing yields greatly... that's one of the big reasons for the Intel 28 core retailing for around double the cost of the current Epyc 32 core.

    Intel is also having problems manufacturing at the 10 nm process, all their current CPUs are on a highly refined 14 nm process. Current Ryzen desktop CPUs and Threadripper 2 are 12nm. Epyc Zen 2 CPUs in the lab are being made on a 7 nm process. AMD is about to pull very far ahead of Intel in the high end server space...

  9. #19
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    Thanks for the corrections.

    Quote Originally Posted by HoJoPo View Post
    AMD is about to pull very far ahead of Intel in the high end server space...
    That depends on the workload. I work for a trading firm where single-thread performance is key, and Intel is still winning in that space.
    Offering a bounty for:
    - A working Sanyo MBC-775
    - Documentation and original disks for: Panasonic Sr. Partner, Zenith Z-160 series
    - Music Construction Set, IBM Music Feature edition (has red sticker on front stating IBM Music Feature)
    - Any very old/ugly IBM joystick (such as the Franklin JS-123)

  10. #20
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    Quick ramble about mine.....

    Using auto settings, the system was stable and didn't overheat at 5Ghz across all six cores with Prime95 @ 100%.
    But other than bragging rights I don't really need an overclock and the voltage was higher than I was comfortable with - so it's back at defaults.

    I was quite happy (and surprised TBH) to see Intel had made a bit of extra effort and included these two little cards inside the CPU pouch:

    Cert8086.jpg

    For RAM I never get high end stuff - I've always found memory speed upgrades to be the most depressing way to spend money - so it's just 2 x 8GB G-Skill at 2666Mhz CL15.

    For cooling I didn't feel like mounting a big air cooler this time around, and I've never been completely comfortable with that much weight on the motherboard when a system is being moved around - especially when they get older and get shunted a bit. So for the first time ever, I tried an AIO, I went with the CoolerMaster ML240L - it's a thin 240mm radiator with dual fans - thin is important because I wanted a top mount and most cases don't have enough space for top coolers to clear the RAM.

    For video I went with a Gigabyte GTX1080, despite it being a brand I said I'd never buy again. In this case it was a factory second that'd been fixed up, and was selling for GTX1070 prices in it's original box - it works great. Barely gets warm, the only time I've heard the fans spin up was when I did it manually with the controller.

    I also have a PCI-E USB 3.0 adapter in the back.

    Case I went with the Fractal Design Meshify C - with the exception of lacking a USB-C header, and less mechanical HDD mounting room than I'd like, it ticked all the other boxes - such as a top mount radiator + tempered glass + hidden PSU etc. I really like the dark tinted glass because I wanted to do LED lighting, but didn't want it to be the usual super bright wow-fest and I think the dark glass helps keep things a bit more subtle.

    newpc.jpgnewpc2.jpg

    I know it's "cool to hate" on RGB lighting, but I quite like it.
    Thankfully the Gigabyte video card has no lighting, so with the dark glass I don't even see their logo when using it

    Windows 10 fixed itself (I did not install fresh) and booted to desktop (used the same install I had on my old Asus Z170AR + i7 6700K setup - which will now be sold off for parts).

    For storage I have a 500GB Samsung 970 Pro on the motherboard with M.2, a 250GB Samsung 850 (or 840?) SSD hidden away for my games library, and a 2TB WD Red for storing video files. Transferring my system from the old Samsung to the new M.2 drive was super easy with Samsung's Data Migration tool.

    System boots Windows 10 faster than it can do it's own POST routine.

    EDIT: As for Z370 + CPU - it's the same as any other generic six core build really - I have enough PCI-E lanes for what I do and it works and it's pretty brisk.
    Asrock Gaming K6 has a serial port, PS2 ports, VGA - which I thought were interesting gamer choices? And were one of the only companies to bother redesigning their power delivery for the new slightly modified socket design (AFAIK) in the mid-range market - so that's why they got my vote. Would have preferred more USB connectors on the back, and more on the case, but we can't have it all I guess.

    EDIT: One big issue was that most motherboards in stock here in NZ had not had the BIOS updated and thus did not support the i7 8086K - I ended up having to pay someone else to slap a new i3 in it and do the update. Very annoying!
    Last edited by SpidersWeb; Yesterday at 07:20 PM.
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