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Thread: I finally ported CP/M!

  1. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by 8008guy View Post
    Did you ever make a video showing how to use ED? For the life of me I have never been able to do anything useful with it. If I use it on a new file I can enter text and then save. But if the file already has text in it I'm totally lost on how to get it displayed. I try the 'T' command. But the CP must be lost in space...

    Cheers,

    len
    I used ED, and an ED-like editor on FDOS-III, but that was coming from punch cards and timeshare BASIC on an ASR-33 Teletype. You've got to channel your inner "Master Po" (from Kung Fu) in order to use it. Going backward to ED from modern editors is very very difficult.

    If you're really a glutton for punishment, there is an "ed" on Linux you could bruise your forehead against. Similar sort of thing, possibly better documentation. I can also send you a brick to hit yourself with, I won't charge much for it.

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by durgadas311 View Post
    I used ED, and an ED-like editor on FDOS-III, but that was coming from punch cards and timeshare BASIC on an ASR-33 Teletype. You've got to channel your inner "Master Po" (from Kung Fu) in order to use it. Going backward to ED from modern editors is very very difficult.

    If you're really a glutton for punishment, there is an "ed" on Linux you could bruise your forehead against. Similar sort of thing, possibly better documentation. I can also send you a brick to hit yourself with, I won't charge much for it.
    I played with ed a bit tonight, I do feel sightly brused. I did discover the "a" command to copy the disk buffer to the edit buffer.

    My favorite editor is vi, when I use normal full screen editors I tend to hit esc more often than not...
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  3. #13
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    ED reminds me of TECO a bit. You can do wonderful things with it, if you know the incantations to use.

    Here are various TECO versions, including at least one for MS-DOS

  4. #14

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    Honestly, if you're going to go back to ed you might as well just learn TECO; at least then you've picked up a Turing-complete language.
    Computers: Amiga 1200, DEC VAXStation 4000/60, DEC MicroPDP-11/73
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  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by commodorejohn View Post
    Honestly, if you're going to go back to ed you might as well just learn TECO; at least then you've picked up a Turing-complete language.

    I don't plan on using it much. Just that, like vi, it's there by default. When you're working on a bare install it is quick and dirty. For anything significant I edit under linux and move files onto an emulator or the real machine.
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    Quote Originally Posted by 8008guy View Post
    Looking back it was a pretty intense way to pass five monthsí worth of evenings and weekends. Before I started I had read many websites and documents about porting CP/M to a new system. I canít even begin to count the thousands of lines of 8080 assembly code I read though. I really envied, and now greatly admire, those who have boot strapped their own custom systems. I had an amazing amount of help from Martin. Even using modern tools, emulators, a logic analyzer, and with the Internet this was a real challenge. It give me great appreciation for those who did it back in the 70ís and 80ís. For anyone wanting a real challenge I say go for it, you will never regret it.
    It was a good deal easier "back in the day" - people were intimately familiar with the 8080/8085/Z-80 instruction set, and could work in hex just as easily as using an assembler. There were a large variety of cards available, so if you weren't sure if you had flaky hardware or your code was bad, you could just change out the card. There were enough similar systems around that you didn't have to do cross-development (the worst you'd have to deal with was writing drivers for MP/M on a CP/M system). Some of the systems were quite advanced for their time. The Durango F-85 was a good example of the state of the art.

    Having come up "from the trenches", including several years at Lifeboat Associates where I did a number of CP/M implementations including the Datapoint 1550, another employee and I left to start our own company, Pro-Comp Systems. I put some of the Pro-Comp documentation (for the Pro-Comp/8) on my web site here. These are lightly-tweaked (to be readable in ASCII) WordStar files. People here might be interested in reading them - the CP/M was completely interrupt-driven, could run processes in the background (complete with filesystem I/O), implemented TSR-type programs, and so forth. The MP/M implementation was even more complex, but I don't seem to have those documents handy. Eventually we moved to TurboDOS because we couldn't get Digital Research to deliver the promised MP/NOS multiprocessor code - they were busy doing something with George Morrow. We did a bunch of work with Spectravideo (CP/M for the SV-318/328, along with some other stuff), Sony (hard drive support and CP/M work for the SMC-70) as well as branching out into contract hardware design.

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chuck(G) View Post
    Congratulations!

    But "ported" to me implies crossing architectural boundaries. For example, x80 to x86 or 6800 or z8000 or 68K or ARM or...

    You get the idea. I guess that I've never heard the word used in the sense of staying with the same ISA. Where I heard it the most was with Unix.
    Just for the record... The CCS code is native Z80. I did have to recompile or otherwise swap out sections of Z80 code to work on my 8080...

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  8. #18
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    Terry, I believe we ran into each other briefly when I was working at Durango Systems.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Chuck(G) View Post
    Terry, I believe we ran into each other briefly when I was working at Durango Systems.
    Yup. You're one of those brilliant 80's programmer types - you sent me the source for a driver for the (forthcoming) F-85 hard disk option, with a note that you hadn't tested it because the hardware wasn't ready or somesuch. I assembled the driver and there was one trivial syntax error - something like a ":" instead of a ";" in a comment. After fixing that, it worked fine.

    I've written elsewhere that the F-85 getting 1MB on a 5.25" floppy was quite an achievement at the time. I think that record stood for quite a while, until Vertimag released their 5MB perpendicular media (I had one of those as well).

  10. #20
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    You should have seen me in the 60s and 70s...

    Strangely enough, I still have two of the machines--one with the 20 MB ST506-type drive (Rodime, I think) and one that uses the 14" SA4000 drive on a GPIB bus. Haven't powered either up for a few years, however. Both have the hi-resolution printer upgrade as well as bank-switched RAM.

    They're probably pretty rare by now. After Durango, I went back to coding for supercomputers for a time--variety is the spice of life, you know.

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