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Thread: I finally ported CP/M!

  1. #21

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    Quote Originally Posted by 8008guy View Post
    My favorite editor is vi, when I use normal full screen editors I tend to hit esc more often than not...
    Writing vi for the 8080 has been on my list for years. To make it fast enough to feel right, it’s going to have to be a from-scratch effort. Nothing I’ve seen to start with comes close to having the right feel speed wise. The one exception is WordMaster - the precursor to WordStar. I’d love to have the source for WM and start from there. It would make the effort much easier.

    Mike

  2. #22
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    Vi for 8080 would be very cool. It's a bummer that the source for a lot of software was never made available. There is so much to learn from creative assembly langauge programs.
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  3. #23
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    If you'd like, I still have the source for an WYSIWYG programmer's editor that I wrote some 8080/Z80 maybe 40 years ago. It's based on one I found in (I think) Kilobaud mag. The only requirement is that you have to have your video memory-mapped. If you're working with a serial terminal, not easily modified. I ported (correct term) to MS-DOS x86 and still use it on occasion.

    There are probably a few in the CP/M SIMTEL archives as well.

  4. #24

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    vi would be pretty easy to write. I wrote a vi alike for the C64 before turning it into a Wordstar (or more appropriately TP IDE) alike.

    I can use vi for just about anything. But if I'm going to spend hundreds of hours coding, I just prefer the latter if it's available. In fact, the TP editor is what I use most for CP/M.

    vi is like RPN: A very good compromise between usability for the user and executability for the computer.

  5. #25
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    When I was just starting out (before CP/M) with this personal computing thing, I had an 8080 system with all of 16K of memory (static RAM, lots of 2102s). My file system was a digital cassette tape unit (2 drives, transfer up to 9600 bps with fast search capabilities--a Techtran unit). And I had a Beehive Super Bee terminal, which was a bit unusual when compared to terminals of the 80s and later. It had a page edit mode--fill a screen with data, go offline, edit the screen and then hit "TRANSMIT" to send the edited data back to the computer. If you've ever used one of the early CPT word processor systems, they worked in much the same way.

    Just shows what you can do with limited memory and no disks.

  6. #26

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    Page/form-mode terminals are a fascinating notion because they make absolutely perfect sense as long as you're coming at the idea of computing from a specific business/data-oriented mindset, and don't really line up with absolutely anybody else's preferred way of working in practice. I was surprised how many of the latter-day terminals I ended up with included some kind of optional form-mode command set.
    Computers: Amiga 1200, DEC VAXStation 4000/60, DEC MicroPDP-11/73
    Synthesizers: Roland JX-10/SH-09/MT-32/D-50, Yamaha DX7-II/V50/TX7/TG33/FB-01, Korg MS-20 Mini/ARP Odyssey/DW-8000/X5DR, Ensoniq SQ-80, E-mu Proteus/2, Moog Satellite, Oberheim SEM
    "'Legacy code' often differs from its suggested alternative by actually working and scaling." - Bjarne Stroustrup

  7. #27

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    On the subject of vi for CP/M, I ported Stevie to it and it works, but is extremely slow. Stevie is a vi clone that was written for the Atari ST. It's just fast enough on the ST (8mhz 68000) but on a 4Mhz Z80 it's waaay too laggy.

    Another vi-like editor is s, which is being maintained by Udo Monk: https://github.com/udo-munk/s

    I have downloaded the code but haven't had a chance to try it out. It's been built for CP/M.
    Last edited by JonB; June 13th, 2018 at 10:54 PM.

  8. #28

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    As far as Wordstar-alikes go, ZDE/VDE has been my go-to when I'm using CP/M. Fairly lightweight, reasonably featureful, and decently zippy on my Kaypro.
    Computers: Amiga 1200, DEC VAXStation 4000/60, DEC MicroPDP-11/73
    Synthesizers: Roland JX-10/SH-09/MT-32/D-50, Yamaha DX7-II/V50/TX7/TG33/FB-01, Korg MS-20 Mini/ARP Odyssey/DW-8000/X5DR, Ensoniq SQ-80, E-mu Proteus/2, Moog Satellite, Oberheim SEM
    "'Legacy code' often differs from its suggested alternative by actually working and scaling." - Bjarne Stroustrup

  9. #29

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    Quote Originally Posted by Chuck(G) View Post
    ... I ported (correct term) to MS-DOS x86 and still use it on occasion.
    Chuck, the term "ported" has no such restricted definition. Modern day Linux community developers "port" patches from one version of the kernel (or software package) to another, having nothing to do with changes in CPU architecture. "Porting" simply means making changes as required for a new environment, which could be the same CPU or even CPU-agnostic code. I understand how "porting" CP/M sounds a little strange in this case, as in the past it was typically writing a whole new BIOS, but the effort did require making changes in order to run CP/M (BDOS, CCP, etc) in a new environment and so the term does fit.

  10. #30

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    I don't think the CPU much to do with it either, as it seems common to me to say that something was ported from PET to Apple ][.

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