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Thread: Poison Ivy.... Oh god

  1. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by Uniballer View Post
    I must recommend triclopyr as the active ingredient to go after poison ivy. It propagates farther through the plant's vascular system before the plant dies. It is the active ingredient in Ortho Poison Ivy Killer and many others. Check Tractor Supply, for example (a few years ago they had a product called "Clear Pasture", now they have several other concentrated products based on triclopyr).
    uniballer, the problem where I am is poison ivy is everywhere! I wouldnt mind something voltaile if I was in the woods killing a creeping vine but what if its near a patch of my lawn or other plants I care about.

  2. #32
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    I use Triox sparingly. Triox is maybe the closest thing to the real Agent Orange that you can legally get on the market. You have to be extremely careful with it as once it is down, nothing will grow back for years. I used it on the ground base under my deck over 25 years ago, and nothing grows there to this day.

  3. #33

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    Not saying that everyone should spray their poison ivy. Triclopyr is far more selective than glyphosate (Roundup). It generally does not kill grasses, but it can stunt them for a while. It can harm woody plants, though, so you do have to be careful with it. If you do use it, try to pick a day with little to no wind and moderate temperatures.

  4. #34
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    there seems to be/ or have been a blight that killed most of the cedar trees in the area. I am trying my best to keep the remaining ones alive, but the other pines or hardwoods could go to hell. There are areas of just "Woods around my house" It would be nice to have a strong poison I can spray on poison ivy vines and other creeping vine going up the trees to kill the vines before they kill the trees. Something that wont hurt the tree preferably or it defeats the purpose of what I am doing.

  5. #35
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    As a frequent victim of Poison Oak in the past, "Fells Naptha" soap is the only soap that works for me after exposure to Poison Oak. It can be hard to find but it can be ordered online.
    The steroid shots can reduce the recovery time but frequently cause unpleasant side effects.
    Beware the roots of the PO plants as they are brutal. Caution is advised to people who claim not to be sensitive to it as heavy exposure may change that. I have been a firefighter in central CA and you can indeed suffer dramatically from the smoke of fires involving PO.
    Kaypro 1,2,II,2X,10 Apple IIe Apple IIgs Commodore 128d, 64 IBM 5160 Ampro littleboard

  6. #36
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    You have to get the poison oak/ivy early before it blooms or sets seed, but after it's leafed out.

    I do my spraying in early spring with a mixture of 2,4D, glyphosate and trichlopyr (Weedar, Roundup and Garlon). Probably overkill, but I'm also after scotch broom and blackberry. It doesn't hurt the trees, but kills PO, broom and slows the blackberry down. It's a foliar spray, so it doesn't get into the soil. If I were after PO only, I would use just 2,4D and glyphosate. Be sure to add a spreader-sticker to mixture--you don't want the stuff washed off by rain.

    In autumn, the blackberries (the Himalayan/Armenian ones are our kudzu) get their spray of glyphosate only--they usually don't return in the spring. I'll usually go in with my chainsaw sometime around mid-summer and clear a path so I can get to them with a sprayer.

  7. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chuck(G) View Post
    You have to get the poison oak/ivy early before it blooms or sets seed, but after it's leafed out.
    thats a very narrow window. We have like a 2 week spring where I live. We go from bare trees to leaves in literally a couple weeks.

  8. #38
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    Please allow me to be clear--you need to get the stuff before it sets seed--that's a much wider window--in my area, it happens to coincide with the time when broom blossoms, which is when that pest is most susceptible to herbicides. If you can see berries on the PO, you're too late.

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