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Thread: Poison Ivy.... Oh god

  1. #21
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    calamine lotion does ZERO for me. I mix camphor tablets (which apparently are pretty toxic) into isopropyl alcohol and slather that on the bad spots. gives an icy hot relief.
    I cant believe at this day and age there isnt a cure for this blight.

    Or better yet, why haven't they weaponized it? My doctor said it only takes a couple molecules to have a reaction.

  2. #22

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    Quote Originally Posted by lutiana View Post
    Oh I agree, bees are great. I just refer to Yellow jackets as "asshole bees" as they are assholes, who look like bees.
    I was at a picnic once, minding my own business when all of a sudden, one of these nasty things was stinging me in a circle. It managed to do 6 stings before I squashed its life out. It was about a 120 degree part of a circle. It seems someone at the other end of the table was swatting them. One should never swing hard enough to hit them. You should just repeatedly shoo them away. Never let them get a bit of sandwich meat back to the hive or they will return with an army. I do have one of those swatters that looks like a small tennis racket, with a button on the handle. They fly slow and are easy targets.
    In any case yellow jackets aren't even wasp they are a type of hornet. Most wasp will leave you alone.
    Organic farmers, that know what they are doing, like to have yellow jackets around. They love the various pest that eat crops.
    Dwight

  3. #23
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    If you step on a YJ nest, the only thing you should do is run. Don't swat, roll, or squash the buggers; it just makes them more angry--just put as much distance as quickly as you can between you and the nest. After awhile, you learn to tune your ears to the angry mass buzzing and make tracks. I've seen them chase a D8 Cat operator off his machine when he hit a nest--some language that would make a sailor blush.

    A favorite trap out here is to hang a piece of meat (chicken works well) on a tripod above a bucket of water. The greedy insects will try to fly away with more than they can carry, fall into the water and drown. Pretty soon, the bucket's full of them.

    YJs may be hornets and not wasps, but I've never run into a hornet's nest (we have he baldfaced ones here) that elicited as much viciousness as a YJ one. And I've seen YJs attack baldfaced hornets--especially in the autumn.

    There are foaming aerosols that can be sprayed from 10-20 ft onto a nest that seem to do an adequate job. The old-timers here would wait until very early morning and pour diesel down the nest holes. That worked also.

    Raccoons, if they're hungry enough, will dig up a nest at night while the YJs aren't active. There's about a pound of pure protein there for the taking.

  4. #24
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    I have these clear cups with holes at the top. I fill them with humming bird nectar. They smell the sweet liquid go in, and cant come out. They drown. I havent noticed too many this year so I havent put out the traps.

  5. #25
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    I've seen two other commercial traps--one is a tubular container with a vent screen at the top and holes in the bottom large enough for a YJ to enter. Inside is an inverted cone with an opening just large enough for a YJ to crawl through. You put the "bait" under the cone--the YJ's enter in the bottom and can't figure out how to fly down.

    The other one is simply a large plastic jar (like a big pickle jar) that's been pierced transversely with a piece of 1" PVC pipe. The pipe has an opening carved in the middle, pointing down. You put your bait inside the jar and the idea's the same--the YJ can't figure out how to fly down and out of it.

    Both come with bait which is soaked in cotton. I believe that the bait is heptyl butyrate, which works early in the season, but not at all in the autumn, when YJs are at their most aggressive. At that point, meat is the most potent attraction--the buggers go protein-nuts.

    I'll add that the YJs we have here are vespula pensylvanica, whereas the eastern variety are vespula maculifrons. WikiP calls both "wasps" and incidentally, calls the "baldfaced hornet" a species (Dolichovespula) of YJ wasp and not a true hornet. So we're doubly cursed.

  6. #26
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    I tried using a chunk of salmon for yellow jackets, it ended up putrifying not catching anything so I stick to the sweet stuff.

  7. #27

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    This thread reminded me of the rhyme my mom & dad would recite evry time we were starting a hiking trip in the Sierras: "Leaves of three, let them be"

    Found a nice site with lots of poison ivy/poison oak info: http://www.mount-rainier-cabins.com/...vs-poison-oak/

  8. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by VERAULT View Post
    I tried using a chunk of salmon for yellow jackets, it ended up putrifying not catching anything so I stick to the sweet stuff.
    It's the western yellow jackets that are the carnivores. I think yours like sweet stuff. During late summer, you can often see them competing with the buzzards and ravens for roadkill.

    I find that YJs don't care much for permethrin, so I spray my work clothes with an 0.5% solution after every washing. Tea tree oil seems to repel them as well.

    I must be getting more careful in my old age, or less susceptible. PO doesn't bother me the way it used to--I'll still get the occasional rash, but it's not the weeping mess that I used to get.
    Last edited by Chuck(G); June 13th, 2018 at 08:44 PM.

  9. #29

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    Funny about poison ivy. I've hiked here is the West for years and have never encountered it. Last decade I've been living in the mountains and rely of firewood. Still no poison ivy. It's got to be a regional thing because I don't think anybody I've met has had an issue with it.
    WANTED: Cardinal 2450MNP modem.

  10. #30

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    Quote Originally Posted by Chuck(G) View Post
    Mostly, I start each spring when the PO leafs out, but before it blooms with my backpack sprayer. I hit the stuff with a mixture of glyphosate and 2,4-D to kill it before it can propagate.
    I must recommend triclopyr as the active ingredient to go after poison ivy. It propagates farther through the plant's vascular system before the plant dies. It is the active ingredient in Ortho Poison Ivy Killer and many others. Check Tractor Supply, for example (a few years ago they had a product called "Clear Pasture", now they have several other concentrated products based on triclopyr).

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