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Thread: stm32f103 eForth

  1. #11
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    Well, where they differ significantly is in the peripherals. The STM32F4 is a dual bus setup, where as the F1 is a single bus setup with considerably fewer and less-capable peripherals. For example, the F4 has 2 DMA controllers, each with up to 8 streams on 8 channels, also has internet interfacing capabilities, LCD drivers and other such nice stuff like lots more memory. Integrated SDIO, USB OTG, more A/D converters, etc.

    But it's also more complicated to program than the F1

    The core instruction set is essentially the same on both, although the F4 has hardware floating point support.
    Last edited by Chuck(G); June 15th, 2018 at 11:43 AM.

  2. #12

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    One shouldn't confuse F1 parts with F10x parts. They are quite different.
    Dwight

  3. #13
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    Where did you get that notion? STM even calls them F1. They're so classified in my development suites.

  4. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by Chuck(G) View Post
    Where did you get that notion? STM even calls them F1. They're so classified in my development suites.
    I stand corrected.
    There are several places I've seen them separated. Still, I see them in the general group as STM32F1 as you've noted.
    They do document the F100 differently than the F101 to F107. The F105 comes with such things as the OTG USB. The F40X parts are newer with more memory, higher speeds, and cross bar I/O options.
    Dwight

  5. #15
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    I seem to recall that the Gotek floppy emulators use the F105, which is actually a deprecated part, as is the F107.

    The F2 peripherals seem very close to the F4 ones.

    I think the 5V tolerant I/O extends only up through the F4 series; the F7 seems to have 3V I/O only. There is a stripped-down version of Linux that runs on an F4--and there's a group of developers who use Python as their F4 development platform.

    Then there's the very low-end F0 series--that never made a lot of sense to me from a cost standpoint. One might as well use an F1 part.

  6. #16

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    Yep, the Gotek uses the F105. The F107 has an interface for EtherNet, instead of USB.
    Dwight

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