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Thread: Chainsaws, and all commercial grade equipment they sell, ie. Craftsman poulan etc

  1. #61
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chuck(G) View Post
    Isn't that what impact wrenches are for?
    There are times and places where impact wrenches just aren't practical. All the torque is lost when using long extensions and universal joints, for example.

  2. #62
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    It would seem that if you have room for a 6' pipe, you'd have room for an impact wrench. It's the hammering action that really does the trick when loosening stubborn bolts. Also, you're not likely to split an impact wrench socket.

  3. #63
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    Quote Originally Posted by KC9UDX View Post
    I'm not sure which ones you've seen, but you won't break my 18" Craftsman breaker bar with a 10' pipe. I know; I've bent it and I know what it took. I'm tempted to go to harbour fright and buy one just to put them end to end just to show which one breaks first. Only because I've never seen anything worth buying at HarborFreight other than sandblasting media.
    Harbor freight has its place as long as you keep in perspective what "it" is. That breaker bar I mentioned I will probably buy a second one and keep in the truck just for lugs (blew 2 tires in a week earlier this week.. it was a fluke but being stuck on the highway and using the GM supplied tools took too long)

    I enjoy harbor freight for screw drivers, respirators, goggles, gloves (welding to latex with 10 pak work gloves for my family too), abrasives of all kinds for grinders, drill, rotary tools, plain old sandpaper. Blades for saws of all kinds. Basic sanders, belt or orbital.
    I bought an orbital sander, for $15.00 on sale. I paid $4.00 for the warranty of 2 years.. I used it to resurface support beams to my shed, window flower boxes and build a new ramp to my shed, as well as repair a split post on my kids bunk bed. the saw dust bag was designed to low; almost flush with the wood. So the bad wore a hole.. I brought the saw in. They gave me a new one. Is it the best saw? No, but it works, the media is cheap and for its purpose I cant complain. I need to re-surface our bay window with it next.

    Would I buy sockets from HF? maybe some 1/4 bits Im missing.. maybe.,

  4. #64
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    Impact wrenches should never be used to tighten any bolts/nuts that must be properly torqued, such as head bolts, axle nuts, etc. While lug nuts typically are tightened with impact tools these days, when doing so making sure that the tightening sequence is followed carefully so as to not warp the brake rotors (tightening in stages and across the hub, for a 5-lug bolt pattern 'draw the star' with the tightening, and always tighten in stages).
    Last edited by lowen; June 30th, 2018 at 10:17 AM.
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  5. #65
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    I definitely use the cross pattern when doing lugnuts, I always do them by hand.

  6. #66

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    I have a big complaint against shops using a impact wrench to tighten lug nuts. I've see two cases of wheels falling off with broken lug bolts. In one case it was a friends car. They'd just been in for a tire change. I used my torque wrench on the other wheels. Not one nut was torqued to less than 150 foot-lbs. They are suppose to use a torque limiting coupling to install the wheels. They take the nuts off without the coupling and forget to put it back on to tighten.
    The untrained wheel changer don't realize you can over, as well as under, tighten lug nuts. Lug nuts tighten to over 150 foot-lbs should have the lug bolts replaced. They should never be that tight when replaced. They have specs that should be followed. They are rarely over 75 foot-lbs.
    Dwight

  7. #67
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dwight Elvey View Post
    I have a big complaint against shops using a impact wrench to tighten lug nuts.
    As with any tool, an impact wrench can be used improperly.

  8. #68
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    The torque value is dependant on the size and type of the lug and the type of wheel. 75 is fine for "lugs and conventional steel wheels, but not for a lot of modern vehicles. This is why I laugh when they tell me they are using calibrated impact wrenches. You can get calibrated pneumatic torque wrenches, but you have to keep them calibrated and use different ones for different torque values.

    In the rare occasion that I let someone else tighten my lug nuts, I always take them off and put them back on. I let Farm&Fleet take the wheels on and off my wife's car the last time. I'm getting old and lazy I guess. But it was fun to hear their admiration of the suspension.

    Evenly torquing lugs (and keeping them that way) is very important if you have disc brakes. I have never had rotors warp on vehicles that I maintained.

    Quote Originally Posted by Chuck(G)
    It would seem that if you have room for a 6' pipe, you'd have room for an impact wrench. It's the hammering action that really does the trick when loosening stubborn bolts. Also, you're not likely to split an impact wrench socket.
    There are many cases where I've needed long socket extensions and universal joints to remove large screws. When you use those things, they twist. That amount of twist can be as much as you get from one hammer action on a torque wrench.

    Often times, I've had to loosen screws that my largest impact gun won't loosen. And since battery powered impact wrenches, you can pretty much take one anywhere. But that wasn't always the case. A pneumatic impact wrench doesn't do much good in a barn without an air compressor. There are times when an impact wrench is inappropriate to use, too. I wouldn't use one to loosen cylinder head bolts and studs, for example. There's too much chance of getting debris where it doesn't belong.

    Impact sockets can be broken. They break more violently, but they do break. Especially the cheaper ones. Black oxide finish doesn't necessarily mean hardened tool steel.

    You don't always need to use the right tool for the job, but it helps.
    Last edited by KC9UDX; June 30th, 2018 at 08:16 AM.

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