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Thread: Computer that used a DB9 connector for casset interface?

  1. #1

    Default Computer that used a DB9 connector for casset interface?

    Hello all,

    I a box pf commodore stuff I bought a few months ago I just found two packages containing a cassette interface cable that goes from a DB9 male (molded connector just like an Atari style joystick) to three 1/8" mono phone plugs. There is a small picture on the package that shows the connector area on the back of 'some' computer and I have been racking my brains to figure out what computer used this type of cassette interface connector.

    Any ideas? When I get home tonight I'll take a picture of the cable and package.

  2. #2
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    Offhand, I'll venture that no computer ever used a DB-9 connector for a cassette interface or even for display or serial port connections.

    (Maybe I'm fighting a losing battle)

  3. #3
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    The TI-99/4A used a 9 pin connector for the cassette port. The same port design was used for joysticks.

    http://www.1000bit.it/support/manual...ortPinouts.htm
    http://www.mainbyte.com/ti99/hardwar.../recorder.html shows the cable so you can see if it matches.
    Last edited by krebizfan; July 2nd, 2018 at 09:34 AM.

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    Chicken!

    The D-sub connector is properly called a DE-9. The letter after the "D" refers to the connector shell size:



    There are oddball D-sub connectors, such as the 19-pin used on Mac, Atari and Next machines. They're often called, DB-19, but that's not correct, as the shell size isn't standard.

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by krebizfan View Post
    The TI-99/4A used a 9 pin connector for the cassette port. The same port design was used for joysticks.

    http://www.1000bit.it/support/manual...ortPinouts.htm
    http://www.mainbyte.com/ti99/hardwar.../recorder.html shows the cable so you can see if it matches.
    Thanks, that is it! Now I know what they are for. The two I have are not made by TI and I did not see them mention the computer name on the package which I thought was weird. I'll post a picture this evening.

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by Chuck(G) View Post
    Chicken!

    The D-sub connector is properly called a DE-9. The letter after the "D" refers to the connector shell size:



    There are oddball D-sub connectors, such as the 19-pin used on Mac, Atari and Next machines. They're often called, DB-19, but that's not correct, as the shell size isn't standard.
    I know the proper nomenclature but it is not in common use so saying 'DE-9' just gets you strange looks. If you say (incorrectly) DB-9 everyone will know what you mean.

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    "9 pin D-subminiature" avoids the controversy altogether.

    Sorry, but it's been one of my pet peeves for years. Another is calling a micro-ribbon connector a "Centronics" connector, even when it has 50 conductors (e.g. RJ21X). Oddly, nobody seems to call a connector for IEEE-488/GPIB a "centronics" connector. Go figure.

  8. #8

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    Here is the picture I took last night of the '9-pin D-subminiature connector' cassette interface cables. (geesh, I hope I got that right )

    WP_20180702_18_45_19_Pro.jpg

  9. #9
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    Yup, it's for a TI 99/4A.

    See here for more detail

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