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Thread: My sudden GEEK verbal Eureka moment outburst whilst travelling on a passenger train

  1. #1
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    Lightbulb My sudden GEEK verbal Eureka moment outburst whilst travelling on a passenger train

    Recently I was cleaning up some more and came across this Old Computer Book, so I took it with me last week to read during the 1hr train journey,
    to attend a lecture on Cybersecurity.



    By chance I also had this very early PCB in my bag.



    As I looked through the book, sitting in that warm comfortable train carriage, I came across a drawing Fig 152.

    At that moment, it was like Maria had hit me with a LARGE Brick or one of her freshly baked banana cakes.

    I think a few people looked around slightly ratted by my Sudden GEEK verbal Eureka moment outburst.



    Here was pretty much the logic circuit of that circa 1966 PCB I had now pulled out of my bag and was staring at.



    This PCB was from a system made by

    Reyolle Parsons Automation (UK)
    Programme Board
    TSE 380/145


    Used in a South Australian Power Station circa 1966. This Programme board is Numbered 6, and if I recall correctly there were at least 100 similar used. Now such tasks are done by Digital Computer



    I had bought this board from a Scrap Metal dealer in Port Adelaide, Sth Australia in 2016.

    He had most of the card cage and logic boards, but due to what he felt was the level of gold coating was wanting an absolute heap of $'s for the lot (about $2000). If I recall correctly I bought a few boards at Aus$20 each. In one way I wish I had bought the lot. Perhaps if I had asked more questions also, and maybe offered to do some work in his yard in exchange for them.

    BTW Before I posted this, I was aware of the differences between this PCB and the circuit in Fig 152, but I felt it still very worth sharing since my Eureka moment was actually short lived when I studdied both drawing and board more closely.

    Historically the PCB is still an interesting "Computer Programme".

    Reprogrammable by undoing the slotted head nuts on the "X row" topside of board, and moving the long "Y column" screw accessed from the bottom side of PCB to newly needed location, thus making the change by fitting the previously removed slotted head nuts on the "X row" topside of board, back onto to the long "Y column" screws.
    Last edited by inotarobot; July 8th, 2018 at 01:41 AM.

  2. #2

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    Henry Jacobowitz wrote a few different books, all along the lines of making things simple. Too bad he didn't write a book about lightning. Could possibly have cleared up some mish mosh.

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    Question Fokes.

    Do any of you have a photo of what the mating connector to this board was? I assume they were single spade type or flat blade type.

    And even more importantly do you have any of the connectors say 50 of ?

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    It looks like it mates to a card edge.

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    The mating connector would be a rectangular shell with a single row of flat blades to mate with the "sockets" on the PC board. I used these long ago in military applications.

    smp

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    Quote Originally Posted by KC9UDX View Post
    It looks like it mates to a card edge.
    The "mating" gap in the onboard edge spade is only 0.016" - 0.42mm so way to small to be a card edge.

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    Quote Originally Posted by smp View Post
    The mating connector would be a rectangular shell with a single row of flat blades to mate with the "sockets" on the PC board. I used these long ago in military applications.

    smp
    mm thanks for that heads up. I will go and find my Allied Electronic Catalog from 1963 and search the connector section.
    If I can find it then I can try and get a couple NOS from someone on eBay.

    Or I wonder if its possible to 3D print a couple if I can find some suitable flat blade material to use.

    Thinking on that as I write this, I go to a hobby shop and get some thing Brass Strip and cut it to make tiny spades, then try that by fitting them between some mica insulation strips I have.

    Just thought it would be interesting to make some simple program use of the 2 boards I have.

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