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Thread: Big pick up from former software developer (Documentation)

  1. Default Big pick up from former software developer (Documentation)

    As previously posted I got a massive pickup from a software developer for apple back in the 80's and along with the computer that he used I also got a massive amount of manuals and things of that nature and I'm just generally trying to find out more about it. I plan on selling most of it, but I want to get an idea of a fair and honest value because this is really outside my wheelhouse. I'm certain that I have some of the hardware that the manuals are referencing and I also have some of the software. I'm assuming selling the manuals along with the hardware or software is better than individually, but I know he told me had something for Apple that was relatively rare.

    Appreciate any insights and to make it easier to digest I just put everything into a shared google folder with the link below

    https://drive.google.com/open?id=1zD...TqTvS0RYe-0Nh5

  2. Default

    Value: $0

    It's a lot of pages describing a 30+ year old and obsolete computer system. What will anyone do with this? How will anyone benefit in their day-to-day life from owning any of this?

    People nowadays pay money for this stuff because they want to own it, not because it has any value.

  3. Default

    Quote Originally Posted by DFinnigan View Post
    Value: $0
    People nowadays pay money for this stuff because they want to own it, not because it has any value.
    Where in you just proved that it does have value in so much what anyone else is willing to pay for it. I imagine it would also add to the value if I have the matching hardware, which I do, or the matching software, which I do. Seen the discs and manuals sell for $50 each on line. Just trying to get a more accurate idea of what everything is

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by DFinnigan View Post
    People nowadays pay money for this stuff because they want to own it, not because it has any value.
    The same is true for iPhones. They are just effeminate fashion accessories. Yet we literally have consumertards shooting each other over these worthless things.

    Any rate, I think what it might sell for could depend a bit on if there is any significant provable history behind any of the specific items. (Who was the programmer, were they at all well known, what did they program, are any of the documents pre-release or development related, and so on). If there is any history it might be best to sell it as a single lot.

    Otherwise, you would just have to break down each item individually, comparing those to sold prices on eBay.

    Just at a glance, those look like fairly common system manuals that come up on eBay often, but I don't normally pay attention to Apple stuff.

  5. #5
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    They're probably not *totally* worthless, especially if you can sell in person at a vintage computer event, but yeah it's pretty hard to sell most kinds of manuals. Especially if it's documentation to really common software. I personally like having hardcopy of old documentation, I know a lot of people don't care one way or another.

    You seem to have a lot of the standard documentation for common add-on boards for the Apple II series. If you have cards to pair them with, do that.

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    Yeah. Now if he had engineering drawings or handwritten design documents, there may be value there.

  7. Default

    I didn't mean to imply that these manuals were worth $100s of dollars and if I did I apologize. I just have the computer with the matching hardware as well as the matching software and I was trying to see if from seeing the manuals you would know that the matching hardware or software is uncommon or relatively valuable. I do know that he had a software company that he ran with his wife and that he was influential in developing some early systems for Atari, but I don't know what he may have done for Apple.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by glitch View Post
    it's pretty hard to sell most kinds of manuals.
    I buy manuals (lots of them) but they aren't for consumer computers.

    In particular, I don't buy Apple II manuals, which have been almost all scanned at put on asimov.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Al Kossow View Post
    I buy manuals (lots of them) but they aren't for consumer computers.
    Same here, I've got saved searches in several marketplaces for S-100 manuals I just can't seem to find. I also will usually pay moderate amounts of money for DEC engineering prints, even if they're available online already. I have to pay to print tabloid sized drawings, and a lot of the time the originals have better resolution than scans.

    Quote Originally Posted by Al Kossow View Post
    In particular, I don't buy Apple II manuals, which have been almost all scanned at put on asimov.
    A great resource for Apple II folks. I believe I eventually found my IMWI ADA-LAB card's manual there. Still haven't found a disk image of the software package it came with. It's easy enough to talk to via BASIC, the ROM monitor, or assembly though.

  10. #10

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    I'm just gonna say welcome to the Forums, silentshadow56. Hopefully some of these guys won't scare you off with their bluntness.

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