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Thread: Hex2bin for vintage dos.

  1. #1

    Default Hex2bin for vintage dos.

    It seems as time has gone by many of the vintage DOS programs and utilities have been recompiled to run in more modern operating environments, stopping them working in the original ones.

    I have been trying to acquire a hex2bin.exe file converter that will run in my 5155 running DOS 3.3. It might seem like a simple task, but I'm not having much luck at all. I have tried six different versions now and most don't run, one did but it produced no output file. Every one I have found so far seems to have been updated for compatibility with a newer OS.

    Can anyone point me with an address vector to an original version of this software (probably early 1980's vintage) that will do the Intel Hex-binary conversion and will be likely to run in my DOS 3.3 ?

    Thank you.

  2. #2

    Default

    Hi
    Try this one. If it doesn't work i know I have one that I wrote. This one is likely a dos compatible 16 bit code but I can't ensure it.
    The one I wrote, I know is a HEX2BIN.COM so will run on a dos machine. Mine has one issue and that is that it only takes 16 or less bytes per line so if it was expanded to 32 or such per line in the file, it wouldn't work. ( At least I don't think it would ).
    This is not a really hard program to write. If your machine has most any programming language, you should be able to write one yourself. Also, many programmers will do the conversion for you. The Needham PB10 that I have will input HEX and write out binary without any issues. It will even make split binary ( I know my program won't do that ).
    Dwight
    Attached Files Attached Files

  3. #3

    Default

    Hi
    I don't know if this would be of much help but this code runs in DOS under FPC. FPC is a version of Forth that runs on a 16 bit machine. If you don't have fpc, you can get it to load on your machine, someplace on the web. I know I created a *.com file someplace but can't find it. It would be slightly modified from this because I'd have used TCOM, a program to convert Forth code into *.com files. I believe the only change to make is that TCOM doesn't create a Forth interpreter so one has to fetch the file name from the command line ( not to hard if you know where to look ), for the file name. I believe it keeps the fist part of the hex file name and replaces the extension to be FileName.bin.
    Of course, this assumes you know some Forth. It is changed to a *.txt file because this page won't except a *.seq but I believe fpc doesn't care as long as you fully specify the source code file name.
    Dwight
    Attached Files Attached Files

  4. #4

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Dwight Elvey View Post
    Hi
    Try this one.
    Dwight
    Hi Dwight,

    Thank you for posting that one. It behaves exactly the same way as one other I downloaded. It appears to work normally but no matter the usage syntax, or even setting different options, if fails to produce an output file. I would assume for any input file such as file.hex it should output a file.bin, even if I name a new file, no output file is created in either case. It must be incompatible with my dos version.
    (PS: hardware is my strong point, less so on the software side. I am not familiar with Forth)

  5. #5
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    Default

    I have a DOS program called format83 that converts a binary file to Intel hex. Its command line is:

    format83 filename.bin > filename.hex

    so maybe try:

    hex2bin filename.hex > filename.bin

  6. #6

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by dave_m View Post
    I have a DOS program called format83 that converts a binary file to Intel hex. Its command line is:

    format83 filename.bin > filename.hex

    so maybe try:

    hex2bin filename.hex > filename.bin
    Thanks, I tried this using ">". It does create a .bin file, but when I examine the .bin file, the ASCII of all of the bytes there correspond to preamble of the hex2bin application itself and the instructions for its syntax. There is no evidence of any bytes relating to the .hex file I asked it convert. But this does suggest its possibly some sort of syntax issue. I will keep trying.

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hugo Holden View Post
    Thanks, I tried this using ">". It does create a .bin file, but when I examine the .bin file, the ASCII of all of the bytes there correspond to preamble of the hex2bin application itself and the instructions for its syntax. There is no evidence of any bytes relating to the .hex file I asked it convert. But this does suggest its possibly some sort of syntax issue. I will keep trying.
    Have you tried this syntax, i.e., without the '>'?

    hex2bin filename.hex filename.bin
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  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by Stone View Post
    Have you tried this syntax, i.e., without the '>'?

    hex2bin filename.hex filename.bin
    Yes, that is the very first syntax I tried, I thought that should be it too, but this does not produce an output .bin file.

    I wonder if there could be something wrong with the Intel hex file I'm trying to convert, but that seems less likely. There is a dump of the initial part of it here on post #6 in a vintage BPE hex viewer/editor, this file MTEST4.HEX, was created by a DOS 6800 cross assembler from MTEST4.ASM source file which is a memory test utility.

    http://www.vcfed.org/forum/showthrea...p-for-IBM-5155

    but this file appears to be basically ok.

  9. #9

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Hugo Holden View Post
    Yes, that is the very first syntax I tried, I thought that should be it too, but this does not produce an output .bin file.

    I wonder if there could be something wrong with the Intel hex file I'm trying to convert, but that seems less likely. There is a dump of the initial part of it here on post #6 in a vintage BPE hex viewer/editor, this file MTEST4.HEX, was created by a DOS 6800 cross assembler from MTEST4.ASM source file which is a memory test utility.

    http://www.vcfed.org/forum/showthrea...p-for-IBM-5155

    but this file appears to be basically ok.
    It is likely that it is failing because of the longer line size. When I wrote mine, no one made a line longer than 16 bytes. Your data length is 32 bytes ( :20 at the beginning of the lines ). If you only have one file to convert, you can post it and I or someone here can convert it for you. You'll need to change the name of the file. You can attach a .TXT or a zipped file but not a .HEX or .BIN. Also, we'd need to know if you needed split binary. The reason for only having 16 bytes was that the simple line checksum was not robust enough for teletype paper tape. Longer lines were more likely to have undetected errors.
    If the code is for a 6800, it is not likely needed to be split binary. That is usually only needed for 16 bit data busses.
    We'd need to know if you want the binary data to start at 0100H or be 0 or FFH padded? It is not likely that you would want it padded but there times when it is desired.
    Dwight
    Last edited by Dwight Elvey; July 15th, 2018 at 06:44 AM.

  10. #10

    Default

    Thanks Dwight, I think that explains the trouble.

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