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Thread: Which 8-bit platform(s) are good for learning the BASIC programming language on?

  1. #11
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    Actually, just about any 8 bit machine. If it had CP/M it would have a choice of several BASICs.

    Now, if you want to do graphics, that's a different matter.

  2. #12
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    I actually think the Commodore 8-bits have the best entry-level graphics, just due to the standard graphic characters. I guess there are other systems with similar but I have not used them.

  3. #13
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    I add my vote for the BBC micro.

    Its procedures, easy copy/paste (for a text based machine), assembler, groovy graphics modes and easy calling of system routines make it very strong stuff indeed.

    When you want to grow with it you can add other processors either physically or emulated to it easily.


    Cheers,

    Andy.

  4. #14
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    Andy, that might be a good idea, but if the poster is not in the UK, the BBC Micro is pretty uncommon this side of the pond.

  5. #15

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    With all the other useful languages today, why would one want to learn BASIC?
    I could understand it if one already picked a machine like the C64 or such and BASIC was the primary language on the machine but to intentionally learn BASIC as a language to learn bothers me.
    Also, there are so many variations between implementations that one would only be confused going from machine to machine. Older ones require the LET word while newer ones don't, as an example.
    Dwight

  6. #16
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    Also, strings didn't exist in early versions of BASIC. You could use quoted literals in PRINT statements, but that's about it.

    There are so many different versions of BASIC that it's hard to say what to use. For example, CBASIC was very popular in CP/M commercial applications. Then there was BASIC-E (Gordon Eubanks), and then there were about a jillion others, including one that I wrote.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dwight Elvey View Post
    With all the other useful languages today, why would one want to learn BASIC?
    I could understand it if one already picked a machine like the C64 or such and BASIC was the primary language on the machine but to intentionally learn BASIC as a language to learn bothers me.
    Also, there are so many variations between implementations that one would only be confused going from machine to machine. Older ones require the LET word while newer ones don't, as an example.
    Dwight
    You might be right but I still program in basic using VBA as its readily available at work behind most Microsoft stuff and I've used to to link so many things together from the 3270 emulator to our logging program.

    Old 8 bit basic was so accessible and did set me up with a good foundation in programming that has done me well. BBC basic and its easy link to the OS was good grounding when I moved to C etc.

    But I found Java under eclipse hard to get into as it didn't seem to match my linear way of thinking.

    Mind you, I think everyone should program in CUTLASS

  8. #18

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    c128 basic is hard to beat.

    one of the Commodores with simons basic cart was pretty cool... super expander, super basic 64.. super expander brings c64 v2 basic up to v3.5.

  9. #19
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    The Commodore 128 is a good choice. You can write C64 and C128 programs. If you can get the disk, you can do CPM also. Commodore BASIC has string handling functions also. You can probably go to archive.org and start by typing in programs from magazines. Doing that, debugging typos, and then modifying them to my taste taught me a lot.
    PCjr, DTK PC-XT Turbo, 386DX 33, 486 laptop, Pentium 120, Pentium III 500, various old laptops, Commodore Colt, all working. I also have a 286 that I need to see if I can repair.

  10. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gary C View Post
    You might be right but I still program in basic using VBA as its readily available at work behind most Microsoft stuff and I've used to to link so many things together from the 3270 emulator to our logging program.

    Old 8 bit basic was so accessible and did set me up with a good foundation in programming that has done me well. BBC basic and its easy link to the OS was good grounding when I moved to C etc.

    But I found Java under eclipse hard to get into as it didn't seem to match my linear way of thinking.

    Mind you, I think everyone should program in CUTLASS
    VBA aand classic M$ B* really are 2 different animals. And whereas VB is only moderately an oop language, that's the whole point of java and oop, to not strictly think in a linear fashion. But whatever, Commie 128/64 or Atari. But why does it have to be 8 bit? An IBM pc or near/pseudo compatible, preferably with ega or better graphics is the means to produce something interesting. You could scarf Quick or Turbo B* and compile your stuff. The C64 has some interesting and educational technical hurdles to overcome, but it's just not applicable anywhere else. It's graphics are limited besides. It takes a lot of work and ingenuity to produce beautiful graphics on a commie. But for some it's worth it I guess. Another non 8 bit (less belonging to your category then even a pc) is the Atari ST line. Don't think you can operate 2 monitors at a time with an ST, but that would be the sickest development platform out there.

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