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Thread: The History of Timex (Sinclair) Computers

  1. #1

    Default The History of Timex (Sinclair) Computers

    Hey, guys!
    Here's the History of Timex Computers:


  2. #2
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    Nice video very interesting, i owned and still own a timex sinclair 2068 that have a very low compatibility to spectrum software.
    Always found bizarre that they don't cared about software compatibility for this model.

  3. #3
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    Timex Sinclair had originally designed the 2068 to be an NTSC spectrum (even submitted it to the FCC that way) but decided to change it, in part to make it easier to work with planned future models that never were produced. Timex did not understand that the computer industry moved a lot faster than the watch industry nor that available software was what sold computers.

    Good video. Never had a chance to see how Timex ran things away from Connecticut.

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    I've stayed away from anything Sinclair since I purchased a Black Watch kit and it came with no innards. I wrote them and received a blank flex PCB with no components on it. I wrote twice more and got no response. He may be Sir Clive, but he's a swindler in my book.

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    I saw a Timex in an antique mall for an incredibly reasonable price. I meant to go back and get it on the way out but forgot all about it until I read this thread. Oh well, I didn't really need another 19th century 30 hour clock.

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    Still have my TS-2068 collecting dust in the basement. I did manage to get a large amount of software for it a few years back, something I didn't have in 1983.
    What I collect: 68K/Early PPC Mac, DOS/Win 3.1 era machines, Amiga/ST, C64/128
    Nubus/ISA/VLB/MCA/EISA cards of all types
    Boxed apps and games for the above systems
    Analog video capture cards/software and complete systems

  7. #7

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    I recently bought and then sold a TS-2068. It was an interesting computer, but the fact that it wasn't 100% compatible with the Spectrum (even with the ROM) made it more trouble than it was worth. There were enough timing and color issues that playing most of the games I wanted to was impossible without major bugs. Oh well...

  8. #8

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    There's a 2068 and a T/S 1000 around here somewhere. I liked the form factor of the 2068, though the keyboard was awkward.
    I use my C128 because I am an ornery, stubborn, retro grouch. -- Bob Masse
    Machine room: http://www.floodgap.com/etc/machines.html

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by ClassicHasClass View Post
    There's a 2068 and a T/S 1000 around here somewhere. I liked the form factor of the 2068, though the keyboard was awkward.
    I like it too!

  10. #10
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    I got pretty good at using the keyboard on the 2068 (some of the paint wore off after a while on the keys). If you got used to it you had less typos in basic.

    There was a program you could type in that let you do 80 column mode.
    What I collect: 68K/Early PPC Mac, DOS/Win 3.1 era machines, Amiga/ST, C64/128
    Nubus/ISA/VLB/MCA/EISA cards of all types
    Boxed apps and games for the above systems
    Analog video capture cards/software and complete systems

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