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Thread: Reasons to hold on to my Sony Ps2 and/or Nintendo 64

  1. #1

    Default Reasons to hold on to my Sony Ps2 and/or Nintendo 64

    (i.e games)

    I don't know what to look for. The 64 came with a few, don't look that interesting. The Sony came with a dance title, o joy. Generally I guess I like space combat games, driving games. Old arcade stuff. Not really a gamer. Back in the day I was glued to my C64 playing Mars Saga and such. No I can't understand the appeal necessarily either. Me and a friend used to play Star Flight. Something akin to a space rpg, more modern then SF might interest me. I should probably just stick with pcs and vintage compiters probably. I did buy Homeworld 2 recently.

  2. #2
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    I had a PS2, but, that went missing, and some of the games broke. Still have my Nintendo 64, PS1, SNES, GameCube, and Xbox Original v1.6b lying around with its accessories for playing GameBoy games (Super GameBoy for the SNES for games that utilize all 16 colors (Pokemon Red, Blue, and so on), and GameBoy Player for the GameCube).

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    Some of the earlier models of the Playstation 2 retained oddball hardware options that a select number of games supported. EG, Gran Turismo supported network paly via the firewire port on the front of the console. This port was later removed.
    Likewise the network adapter supported IDE hard disks. These days it's mostly used to store "backups" (just call them pirated games ffs) but the real gem is getting the components to boot the official Linux distribution Sony released for the Playstation 2. Controllers and especially memory cards are also now much more affordable and frankly in better shape than N64 controllers which are worth a fortune if their analog sticks are still firm.

    Grand Theft Auto on the Playstation 2 is a must. There are many folks who grew up on it and I still remember the rave reviews on the open world tech that went into GTA III since it was one of the first games to really give you a large and dynamic game map with very few loading screens.
    = Excellent space heater

  4. #4

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    We have a PlayStation 2 hooked up to a big TV in the kids play room. Great Lego Star Wars games on it. Lots of fun for young kids.

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    Now with that being said I am reserved on my opinion for the N64. I came onto its scene several years after its release but was able to get a number of notable titles for cheap because at the time they were not hotter than the sun. For the N64 you get a LOT of more children oriented games with the full Nintendo licensing. Mario, Star Wars, Pokemon, Zelda, Super Smash Brothers. The games are excellent but that's why they fetch so much money these days and as mentioned a lot of the controllers got their analog sticks absolutely beat up by Mario Party mini-games.
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    It's possible to run Linux on the PS/2, even without the Linux kit / network adapter / hard drive. Not really useful without the network adapter, but the last time I looked they were still available.

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    No. The Linux kit requires the hard drive simply because it's a full-fledged Linux installation.

    If you really want to make a PS2 you can show off that's not just another game console. Sony sold all the bits to convert a regular Playstation2 into a Linux RISC workstation. Network adapter, hard drive, installation media, keyboard, mouse, VGA cable and a 16:9 LCD with side mounted speakers.
    Last edited by NeXT; September 14th, 2018 at 12:44 PM.
    = Excellent space heater

  8. #8

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    Which consoles games are pirated on the new Chinese handhelds (the 5" model is dubbed the X9)? I want to say N64 or a lot of them anyway, but I garnered that knowledge a good while back before ai even knew what an N64 was.

    Personally I'm partial to the Genesis as it sports a 68000, and that's cool in every conceivable sense. No consoles used Intel until I guess the first Xbox. Prolly cuz it was a poc and a throwback to those godawful mainframe days (hey if you loved them that's cool with me). I have nothing against the 8086 and such, it's just the 68k is just a way better chip. I'm not sure I've even played anything on a Gen3sis ever LOL, but I got one here I need to work on, just put a coat of paint on a new workbench. I'd like to add a keyboard chip to it, amongst other things. I am intriqued by the various and sundry 68k based projects out there. But what sense is there in overlooking an established platform, so to speak, and grafting various bits on to that.

    Ok I'm going to sell the N64. I'll probably hold onto the ps2 for a while at least. So I can see what all the hooboob is about.

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    I remember a long time ago somebody did a N64 emulator for the PC that needed a 3dfx card, it played mario cart fine.
    What I collect: 68K/Early PPC Mac, DOS/Win 3.1 era machines, Amiga/ST, C64/128
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  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by NeXT View Post
    No. The Linux kit requires the hard drive simply because it's a full-fledged Linux installation.

    If you really want to make a PS2 you can show off that's not just another game console. Sony sold all the bits to convert a regular Playstation2 into a Linux RISC workstation. Network adapter, hard drive, installation media, keyboard, mouse, VGA cable and a 16:9 LCD with side mounted speakers.
    The original PS2 Linux did require a hard drive and the network adapter. However, Linux hackers managed to make a video DVD hosting a live Linux distribution that can be loaded without the original Sony PS2 Linux kit, via USB:

    https://sourceforge.net/projects/ker...ux%20DVD%20v3/

    This also works on the slim PS2, which can't support the network/hard drive adapter.

    http://psx-scene.com/forums/f167/rel...on-3-a-104850/

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