Image Map Image Map
Page 4 of 4 FirstFirst 1234
Results 31 to 32 of 32

Thread: IBM 5154 tube replacement/repair

  1. #31

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Hugo Holden View Post
    I agree, not the flyback transformer, or the EHT multiplier for that matter very unlikely for these reasons:...

    Oh wow, I only know the very basics of monitors, so the majority of this went right over my head, but it makes sense that it would be the tube and not the HV. Iím away from home right now, but tomorrow or Monday I will be adjusting the SCREEN voltage. Any advice for doing that while the monitor is on so I donít kill myself? It seems like it would be very difficult to get to.

  2. #32

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by jacobtohahn View Post
    Oh wow, I only know the very basics of monitors, so the majority of this went right over my head, but it makes sense that it would be the tube and not the HV. I’m away from home right now, but tomorrow or Monday I will be adjusting the SCREEN voltage. Any advice for doing that while the monitor is on so I don’t kill myself? It seems like it would be very difficult to get to.
    That question makes me worried for your safety. An experienced technician would simply adjust it with an insulated tool. It might be risky for you to attempt it yourself. Obviously you could improve your chances of not getting a shock by using rubber gloves, keeping your other hand in your pocket and wearing good insulated shoes on an insulated mat. But, if you are not 100% confident to do it (as there are moderately high voltages on the tube base/pcb area) I would suggest don't attempt it and get an experienced monitor Tech to attempt the adjustment for you. The biggest risk in high voltage work is lack of experience.

    (One trick used by experienced repairers is to set up a mirror so they can see the face of the CRT without bending around to look at it, as then often the hand with the probe or adjusting tool slips off when posture and attention is diverted from where they are, to the screen face, thereby encouraging accidental contact with circuits in the set. So there are of lot of safety tricks used by professionals that you might not be aware of).
    Last edited by Hugo Holden; October 7th, 2018 at 04:33 PM.

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •