Image Map Image Map
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 14 of 14

Thread: SOL-20 UVEPROM module - help.

  1. #11

    Default

    Yes! TI ICs from that era seem to be the worst offenders. I did the same cleaning and pin repair during my restoration.

    I have some notes on mine at https://sites.google.com/site/retroborkenwerk/sol-20

    including the power supply repair and keyboard refurbishment (I punched my own pads - quite easy.) Mike's site is very helpful and I followed much of what he did (although I didn't make his mod to the PSU.) The check-out procedures are reasonable in the manual, so be sure to take it slow and steady. My machine was super-glitchy and I traced this back to bad contacts in the sockets for U65, U66 - the data bus multiplexers, if I recall. I have the Sol running on a N*S controller and Shugart mini floppy with the VSG.

    Good luck! Keep posting!

    -eric

  2. #12

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ef1j91 View Post
    Yes! TI ICs from that era seem to be the worst offenders. I did the same cleaning and pin repair during my restoration.

    I have some notes on mine at https://sites.google.com/site/retroborkenwerk/sol-20

    -eric
    Eric,

    I must say that I like both your writing style and your restoration philosophies.

    I have only recently started restoring vintage computers. I started with an IBM-5155 and now the SOL-20. I am actually a vintage television restorer, specializing in pre-WW2 TV sets, here is a typical one I have restored, as you can see it is a major undertaking to do it properly:

    http://worldphaco.com/uploads/HMV__904_ARTICLE.pdf

    In the same way that vintage computers with large whirring hard drives stirs up notions of the way the computer industry was in the early days, the same applies to television. One reason I wanted to restore a pre WW2 TV set is that I wanted to experience the result first hand, to understand what it would have been like back then. A bit of time travel into the past if you like. It is the same with vintage computers. It is a great feeling to get them up and running and feel & see just what they could do in those times. Computers are a different level again though, what you can do with them, even the early models, is only limited by your own imagination.

    One other area I'm interested in is early TTL based video games, my favorite is Atari's arcade Pong. I designed a pcb for one with the 6 original hardware bugs removed and combined it with an Apple II monitor:

    http://worldphaco.com/uploads/ARCADE_MINI-PONG.pdf

    Hugo.

  3. #13

    Default

    These write-ups are great and now I want to build a TTL arcade Pong!

  4. #14

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ef1j91 View Post
    These write-ups are great and now I want to build a TTL arcade Pong!
    Eric,

    Thank you for those remarks.

    Before I made the mini pong (and figured out how to eliminate the six bugs which I have noted elsewhere are no distraction from the genius of the original design) I noticed that there had never been a detailed circuit analysis published on it. So I set about doing that and created a very long and detailed article on it:

    http://worldphaco.com/uploads/LAWN_TENNIS.pdf

    It turned out that the design gave the ball 42 states of motion.

    The game's designer Mr. Allan Alcorn, contacted me after I published it and I was able to interview him and ask questions about the design and the decision making at the time that resulted in its final form.

    I had also heard there was a fellow in Germany who had attempted to implement the entire game with an FPGA, though I have not seen the result of that or if it got finished.

    Hugo.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •