Image Map Image Map
Results 1 to 8 of 8

Thread: Commodore 64 refused to die

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
    Location
    Portland, Oregon, USA
    Posts
    163

    Cool Commodore 64 refused to die

    Hey guys, I wanted to share this story with you.

    I was out in rural Oregon (outside of Portland) picking up a cool Amstrad PPC 512 computer. The seller said he had some other old stuff that had been outside on his property for a very long time and wanted to see if I wanted it. He had some monitors and a Commodore 64C. I gladly took this stuff home as I can always salvage a part or two from these old devices even if they are ravaged from the elements and then e-waste the rest. (For things sitting outside, Oregon gets hot 100F/37C summer with 4-5 months of sun and very wet and rainy all winter with occasional snow.)

    At home, I wanted to investigate how the oddly heavy C64 was on the inside so I cracked it open:
    https://imgur.com/gallery/rbU80vA

    Yeah it was bad...... I took the filthy motherboard and put it on my deck and powerwashed it with my garden hose and high pressure nozzle. It was the only way I could clear off the ant-colony and debris. It was at that point I got the idea of actually trying to boot the thing up. The board was in very rough shape -- besides rust, the PCB itself was heavily putted and corroded. I thought maybe I could salvage the SID or VIC-II chip as those are rare and one of my other C64s has a bad SID.

    Anyway, you can see in the pictures what happened.... Or if you'd like, I have a video on my YouTube channel about it:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wVphFkaX1gg

    Thought you guys would get a kick out of this! MacBook Pros break with a spec of dust or a bug (Louis Rossmann *cough*) .... but look at that this C64 had to endure for decades outside.
    -- Adrian

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Freedom City
    Posts
    6,153
    Blog Entries
    2

    Default

    Sure better to hear this than the usual "Commodore 64s are pure garbage because they're dying left and right at 30 years old (25 years beyond their likely intended lifetime)".

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Augusta, Georgia, USA
    Posts
    453

    Default

    Great story!

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2017
    Location
    SE Michigan, USA
    Posts
    325

    Default

    Saw the post yesterday, and on YouTube a few days ago under suggestions to watch. Kudos to you. They don't make 'em like they used to. My Packard Bell PC is 24 years old and still going strong, as well as my Commodore 64 that's in an aftermarket case. Sadly, the other C64 lost the RF modulator (will build a logic board to support only the A/V out and find the appropriate resistor since the one where the VIC-II chips are lost its plot), but, I don't know where the board is ATM.

  5. #5

    Default

    i had my 128 fully submerged in sewer water and give it 2 weeks of airing out and it still works! nice video!

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Walled Lake, MI
    Posts
    3,545
    Blog Entries
    6

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Ratix View Post
    i had my 128 fully submerged in sewer water and give it 2 weeks of airing out and it still works! nice video!
    Does it pass the smell test?
    Surely not everyone was Kung-fu fighting

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
    Location
    Los Angeles, CA
    Posts
    145

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Agent Orange View Post
    Does it pass the smell test?
    Hah.. There are some computers you just never want to use again, even if you can get them working.
    Retro PC's: Apple IIe/II+, Atari 800, Atari 520STFM, Commodore 64, Commodore Amiga 3000, IBM PS/1 2121-B82, TI-99/4A, TRS-80 Model 4 GA

  8. #8

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by KC9UDX View Post
    Sure better to hear this than the usual "Commodore 64s are pure garbage because they're dying left and right at 30 years old (25 years beyond their likely intended lifetime)".
    To me, it's just wrong for people to make that kind of comment decades after it was produced. Many of them haven't been treated lightly either. It was never intended for such long use and it performed it's intended use admirably of introducing a whole generation to computers, and programming. Any shortcomings in the design, such as the chip failures 30 years out likely were not even considered for that pricepoint at the time.

    If it was garbage when new, then yes...but I doubt many that had them new would claim that.
    Collection online nonstop since May 1997: http://www.cchaven.com

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •