Image Map Image Map
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 18 of 18

Thread: Floppy Drive for SOL-20

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Pacific Northwest, USA
    Posts
    28,501
    Blog Entries
    20

    Default

    Always meant to try a cut with an oscillating saw. Might work--and you can do blind cuts with them.

  2. #12

    Default

    I looked up the YD580 drive data on Minuszerodegrees. The schematic is there but not the usual topographical view of the jumpers. I have attached some schematic fragments that show the circuit jumpers I could spot on the schematic. Also a photo of the actual drive with the jumpers in positions it came with.

    The drive select D0,D1,D2,D3 and HS and HM jumpers.

    There is also an RY possible jumper on the schematic I can't see on the PCB. Also, there is a pin array where possibly jumpers could be added, labelled G,5,4,3,2B,2A,1B,1A, but this connector might be for factory use. (as noted I will remove the 150R resistor terminator on the first drive and I have fitted a non twisted cable, I didn't realize that this was just an IBM controller thing).

    Just double checking : For the Northstar DD controller/VSG, how should I set these jumpers on the first drive (without the termination resistor) and the second drive at the cable end with the termination resistor?
    Attached Images Attached Images

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Freedom City
    Posts
    6,153
    Blog Entries
    2

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Chuck(G) View Post
    Always meant to try a cut with an oscillating saw. Might work--and you can do blind cuts with them.
    I have used a Sawzall for decades for this kind of thing. But a couple years ago I picked up an old, worn out Black and Decker sabre/jig saw. It does a better job than the Sawzall only because the blade is less massive and it's easier to control. But it too can really hammer at the shoe at times. The blade still tends to walk if you're not super careful. And it can be a disaster if the blade catches the workpiece. The only blades I could find with a pitch fine enough for sheet metal work are made to fit something else, so I have to grind the shank to fit.

  4. #14

    Default

    I would go with: First drive, jumper on D0 only of D0-D3. Second drive, jumper on D1 only of D0-D3. HM installed on both drives. No jumper on HS or RY.

    Mike

  5. #15

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by deramp5113 View Post
    I would go with: First drive, jumper on D0 only of D0-D3. Second drive, jumper on D1 only of D0-D3. HM installed on both drives. No jumper on HS or RY.

    Mike
    Mike, thanks for that,
    Hugo.

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Pacific Northwest, USA
    Posts
    28,501
    Blog Entries
    20

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by KC9UDX View Post
    I have used a Sawzall for decades for this kind of thing. But a couple years ago I picked up an old, worn out Black and Decker sabre/jig saw. It does a better job than the Sawzall only because the blade is less massive and it's easier to control. But it too can really hammer at the shoe at times. The blade still tends to walk if you're not super careful. And it can be a disaster if the blade catches the workpiece. The only blades I could find with a pitch fine enough for sheet metal work are made to fit something else, so I have to grind the shank to fit.
    Not a reprocating saw like a Sawzall, but something like this

    It's a dream on wood and plastic; there are also metal cutting blades for sheet metal.

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    East Coast USA
    Posts
    717

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Chuck(G) View Post
    Not a reprocating saw like a Sawzall, but something like this

    It's a dream on wood and plastic; there are also metal cutting blades for sheet metal.
    I find those tools are too quick and easy to over cut, though they are very good for cutting door trim when doing tile. I have a really good Bosch jig saw that works great. I have specialized blades for the different materials I cut especially plexiglass. You can make a simple jig our of wood that guides the saw into creating near perfect cuts by keeping you within the "lines". Takes some measuring to get the jig right, but it works well. For metal sometimes I use a larger greenlee hole punch to take out giant sections and then use the jig saw with the jig to clean things up.

    If I had easy access to a CNC or a water cutter that would be best.

    Cheers,
    Corey

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Freedom City
    Posts
    6,153
    Blog Entries
    2

    Default

    I have an NC vertical. I rarely use it, especially for sheet metal work. Setup for sheet metal plus slow going cutting usually means hand tools are quicker. I did use it as an NC plasma cutter once. Kinda handy being able to do a tool change and instantly have a carbide endmill setup and ready to clean up the edges, usually with the same toolpath.

    If I didn't have the capability to do this kind of stuff, there are probably a dozen or more competent fab shops within walking distance that would do the work. It's always a good idea to look into that; small shops like cash jobs.

    Watetjets are pretty accessible. They're stupid expensive to run though, and most of them only rival flame tables. You have to pay big bucks for a really nice one, and even more to get one that you don't spend more time servicing than running. There's an outfit working on a tabletop model for the hobbyist market; we'll see how those end up. Really low-grade watetjets can be easily made from CNC router or plasma table machine bases, pressure washer parts, and low-end nozzle.

    I do kind of miss having access to a waterjet for sheet metal work. But I wasn't paying for it. If I was, I probably wouldn't have liked it so much.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •