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Thread: I am putting the CART before the HORSE! ie 300kg of 1960's Computer Hardware.

  1. #31

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    I recall seeing someplace on the web were you can mix up the chemical brew and make your own paper for these things( I mean the printing part ).
    It most likely uses the electrical discharge for the printing part.
    Dwight

  2. #32
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    Used to be called something like "electrographic paper", but this may be single-pen plain-paper, based on the second sample. Hard to say.

    I see the edge of a printed circuit board wedged under the drum, as well as the header for what looks like some ribbon cable. Probably has nothing to do with the unit.

  3. #33
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    Another way of electrically 'printing' on paper was with a small current decomposing postassium iodide, as shown in this page from a 1947 Hobbies Annual I have (picture too large for VCF embedded image)
    http://www.surfacezero.com/g503/data/500/Morse_code_recorder_1947_Hobbies_Illustrated.jpg


  4. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dwight Elvey View Post
    I suspect that both machines are analog drum recorders. The larger drum would be used to print a graph of the signal recorded on the multiple heads. It may have been connected to a mini or such but that may have been to digitize and analyse the recorded signal.
    The SIE is most likely Seismographic Imaging Equipment. I'd guess it was used for recording multiple sensors for things like oil exploration, with tomography. The multiple heads would record each signal and then the computer would do the calculations. The larger drum would be to make the paper images for the mining engineers to look at. That would also fit with being made in Texas.

    Some more evidence:
    https://d28rz98at9flks.cloudfront.ne...ec1964_132.pdf
    Look at the list of manufactures.
    Dwight
    Thanks Dwight,

    that is a VERY informative article.

    Certainly sets the stage for better understanding this item.

  5. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chuck(G) View Post
    It seems not a storage device per se. I was wondering if the drum might be a chart recorder--apparently so. That would fit in with the very simple electronics.

    So if you haul it back, what the heck are you going to do with it?
    To answer your question "What the heck are you going to do with it?"

    Simple answers

    a. The prime reason to get it is to SAVE it from being Scrapped.

    If I have to put it in some storage facility then so be it. However, I am trying to negotiate it going for 'extended loan' to a Technology Museum in Sydney or Melbourne.

    I don't have space at home nor really wish to bring in another item that I cannot move with 2 hands-arms. As you may recall I am trying to downsize all heavy iron

    b. I would, however, like to explore it, photograph and document it, as hopefully get it to run somewhat.

    c. Maybe use it as a STEM learning experience for the younger generation (on the assumption that they wish to learn from grass root technology)

    d. It would be quite interesting to see if it could be connected to my EAI TR-20 Analog Computer and what it may do in conjunction with it.
    So, in that case, it may end up coming home, but staying in an enclosed trailer parked alongside my Bungalow-Computer room
    Last edited by inotarobot; October 16th, 2018 at 04:46 PM.

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