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Thread: Heat pipe heatsinks

  1. #31
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    My point was that you stated:
    They were used because those chips threw off more heat than even a solid copper heatsink could adequately remove, since heatpipes have one or two orders of magnitude better thermal conductivity than the best solid copper.
    And the hot end of these things goes to a traditional finned aluminum or copper heatsink. Unless you've got refrigeration or a chilled water supply, a heatsink, regardless of the material, is still necessary. My point being that heatpipes are useful for conducting heat away to a remote heat sink, where otherwise there wouldn't be space or airflow adequate for an on-chip heatsink. The heat pipe is, in itself, not a good dissipator of heat-to-air; you rely on a conventional heatsink to do that.

    Forgive me for picking nits, please.

  2. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by lowen View Post

    For a thermal design power of 130W, given the size allowable for the heatsink, even a solid copper finned unit wouldn't have a thermal resistance low enough to keep the CPUs within their heat envelope; not to mention the heatpipe system is likely less expensive than a complex shaved-copper heatsink with the requisite surface area would be. Further, a solid copper heatsink that is able to deal with 130W TDP would likely be too heavy to mount the way these relatively lightweight heatpipe heatsinks mount.

    At the 130W TDP level aluminum heatsinks need not apply, since even getting one with enough fin area would be too hot at the CPU, as the thermal resistance is just too high.
    I had a system with dual 5080s, 8 sticks of FB ddr2 with solid copper finned heat sinks. The heatsinks were mounted thought the motherboard and bolted into the case.
    I have dyslexia, I have alot of trouble putting my thoughts into words and spelling/grammar is something I struggle with.
    You may need to read my posts twice to understand what I said.

  3. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chuck(G) View Post
    ...
    And the hot end of these things goes to a traditional finned aluminum or copper heatsink. Unless you've got refrigeration or a chilled water supply, a heatsink, regardless of the material, is still necessary. My point being that heatpipes are useful for conducting heat away to a remote heat sink, where otherwise there wouldn't be space or airflow adequate for an on-chip heatsink. The heat pipe is, in itself, not a good dissipator of heat-to-air; you rely on a conventional heatsink to do that.

    Forgive me for picking nits, please.
    Oh, not a problem. For the 690 heatsink, the fins aren't aluminum, but I'm not 100% sure what they are. They're built a whole lot like a radiator. Heh, if you want to really get pedantic, heatpipes are just short-loop pumpless liquid cooling systems; the pumped liquid coolers need radiators, aka heatsinks (heat exchanger would also be a correct term!), too.
    --
    Bughlt: Sckmud
    Shut her down Scotty, she's sucking mud again!

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