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Thread: Unopened IBM PCjr and Monitor

  1. #1

    Default Unopened IBM PCjr and Monitor

    I purchased three IBM PCjr computers at a computer store in California back in 1985. I gave two away and kept one. After I purchased the computers, I came across the IBM XT. I was so impressed with the XT that I purchased one and didnít even open the IBM PCjr boxes (computer & monitor). I stored the two boxes away and they are still sealed and in perfect shape. I would love to sell the computer and monitor. Any advice will be greatly appreciated. Thank you.

  2. #2
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    My advice for selling something rare or special is to first list on eBay it for a very high price (like $2,500) and try to get offers from potential buyers. Make sure you put things like "Make Offer" in the title and description. These offers probably will be lower than your listed price, however, they will give you a good understanding of what people are willing to pay. Usually people are willing to pay ~15% more than their offer. You can try using counter offers and negotiating. Sometimes you'll also have to wait for the buyer to think about the item. I sold a rare IBM PC on eBay a while back and I first got an offer for $750, but a month later the guy offered $900. If you don't receive offers for a while, just lower the price by a reasonable amount every so often until you get a buyer. However, for a brand new PCjr, I wouldn't go below $1000. A brand new PC AT (system unit only) recently sold for ~$2,150. However, the PC AT is definitely a more capable and collectable machine compared to the PCjr so expect less, even with your monitor. Auctions may also bring a good price, however you might be less informed going into bidding. Also, sometimes waiting for the right buyer is better than setting up an auction. Auctions are a little more risky, because you only have one week for the right buyer to notice your item and once the auction's over, it's sold.

    Hope this helps,
    William

  3. #3

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    Good advice would be this, be realistic. There was a guy selling off 10 new in box PCjr systems a while back and it took him a while to move them all at around $450 each. The latest one on Ebay new in box sold for about $550. You don't look at the price people want for an item, you look at what a similar item has already sold for and figure your price from there.

    https://www.ebay.com/itm/Extremely-R...p2047675.l2557

  4. #4
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    I know that an new PCjr might not be worth more than $550 necessarily, but with the right buyer you can get a lot more for your item. I once sold an IBM 5155 for $1,300 because I found the right buyer. It is by no means the current market value, but nevertheless, it was sold. Again, I once sold a 3270 PC for $900 because I found the right buyer. Other systems were going for $350, but I was able to market my listing effectively and get a lot more.

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    Quote Originally Posted by willmurray461 View Post
    My advice for selling something rare or special is to first list on eBay it for a very high price (like $2,500) and try to get offers from potential buyers
    This is NOT how ebay is designed to operate and the reason why we have an entire thread in the rants section to point out people with their heads in the clouds. Please never suggest this again.

    Ebay gives you quite a few resources to cross-reference previous listings that sold or did not and gives you a method to determine what a BIN should be alongside a minimum bid. If they are selling for less than you expect, it doesn't matter how hard you try to inflate the price. Nobody is going to be interested because they can likely find something in equal condition elsewhere for less.
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    Well if it's something extremely rare I don't think it's horrible advice. Peanuts are anything but rare. How anyone could think a Peanut is rare is beyond me. You sure the told him though!

  7. #7
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    It's a brand new peanut and monitor. I could be wrong about how rare those are, I don't know for sure as I've never been into collecting the PCjr. However, the strategies I posted above are just what I have found to be effective for rare items. I know if you're a buyer it could be extremely frustrating to find an obscene price for an item you're interested in. I've been looking for a 3101 terminal for a while now but the prices now are obscene, upwards of $1500 (they used to be ~$500) just because of the mechanical keyboard enthusiasts and "beamsprings." However, just because I think the prices are obscene doesn't mean someone else out there isn't willing to pay. If you are the only supply, they can charge whatever you want, inflate the market and try to find the right buyer. Even if your item is listed way above market value, if you find the right buyer you can sell it. Again, I listed a 3270 PC a while back and at the time the current market value was $350 and mine was the only one on eBay. My unit was a bit nicer than most and tested/working, and I listed it very high and got an offer for $900. I found the right buyer and was able to increase my profit, even though the current market value was much different. Similarly, I had a 5155 which was pretty well upgraded and restored, tested and working. It was the only one on the market (other than another model listed for $2000) and I sold it for $1300 even thought the market value was $400. I agree that it is frustrating when something is listed for a price nobody will pay, but in most cases there is someone who will pay, who may be crazy or not. This doesn't always work, but in my experience it works quite often with patience. The seller isn't necessarily doing something wrong; you aren't forced to buy his item nor are you entitled to a fair price on his item. He doesn't benefit until his item is sold, and his item will only sell when a buyer (whether that be you or someone else) is willing to pay his price, obscene or not. You might think someone is a bad person for inflating the market or charging an obscene price, but it's just how capitalism works and how sellers increase their profit.
    Last edited by willmurray461; November 26th, 2018 at 01:17 PM.

  8. #8
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    You might think someone is a bad person for inflating the market or charging an obscene price, but it's just how capitalism works and how sellers increase their profit.
    You are still trying to justify a gross markup for the sake of nailing someone who didn't do their homework. It's slightly unethical.

    It's a careful balance. Either you sell at fair market value or you make a profit and end up like VintageComputerMuseum where nobody wants to do business with you.
    In the end, OP can sell at any price and still make a profit.
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    I don't know how people obtain obscene prices for common items. Ok nib adds to an items value significantly, I get it. 500$ for a Peanut? Not from me. But regardless who can accurately place a value on something for which maybe ... maybe 10 exist in the world? For instance a Northstar Dimension in good shape (mine isn't) might go for around the same price as a decent working Lisa 2. Which I'm sure you can agree is a pretty common machine. But a Dimension? Wow maybe 10 out there. By all rights they should go for a lot more. A LOT more. But some things don't have the appeal.

    What about a Vicki? How many of them out there? If I we're lucky I could get 200$ for mine.

  10. #10

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    While I hate it when eBay sellers appear to be seriously trying to get inflated prices for listings, like vintagecomputermuseum is, I want to say that the point is valid that you won't get the best price from an auction. I mean you might if you get a war and someone bids hastily, but otherwise people will think about the item a while before spending the money.

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