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Thread: It is a Commodore C64 Jim, but not as we know it !

  1. #11
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    Price. C64s were cheap and cheap to work with.

  2. #12
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    Love the 65; what are the buttons, switches & LEDs for?

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by KC9UDX View Post
    Price. C64s were cheap and cheap to work with.
    I suppose. Just figure there ought to have been some sort of "embedded system"-type computer which might've worked better for the purpose, along the lines of the Big Board or Rockwell's AIM series, as seen in that AE contraption I have. Not sure if Commodore offered much in that area, beyond the KIM-1 (which predated their acquisition of MOS, of course).

    Quote Originally Posted by MikeS View Post
    Love the 65; what are the buttons, switches & LEDs for?
    The switch/light panel above the keyboard control various functions on the AIM-65, primarily power. Here's a better view of the top panel:

    I have yet to power it up to see exactly how it works. I still need to open its case and examine the power supply, and hope that the rechargeable battery pack didn't leak on anything important..........
    -Adam

  4. #14
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    Hope the inside of that AIM65 is as pristine as the outside.

    Lots of folks, myself included, built custom systems on top of standard systems of the day; different systems were chosen according to the intended use.

    For specific technical applications in labs etc. the AIM65 and to a lesser extent the later 40-column AIM65-40 were often used because of the built-in printer and display, the full keyboard and flexible I/O connections.

    Tandy M100/102s, often with custom ROMs, were favourites among reporters because of the easy-to-read display, great keyboard & battery life and the built-in modem. Along with a similar Panasonic model and the Epson PX-8 they were also used by folks like insurance salespeople and adjusters for on-the-spot estimates etc.

    But for general business applications it was hard to beat the C64 with its larger memory and display, I/O expandability, nice keyboard and of course its price, despite being a little more difficult to integrate.

    Fun times...

  5. #15

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    I've got a KIM-1 in a briefcase. I don't think that would have been particularly unusual, either. It was clearly a custom job.

    The PDC is great. Should be fun to play with the ROMs.
    I use my C128 because I am an ornery, stubborn, retro grouch. -- Bob Masse
    Machine room: http://www.floodgap.com/etc/machines.html

  6. #16
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    That is so weird! I can't imagine that have been a better idea than to do a clean sheet design with a monolithic circuit board, especially considering how expensive portables of the like were back in the day, you'd want to strip as much cost out as possible. Kind of smells like desperation.

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by ClassicHasClass View Post
    I've got a KIM-1 in a briefcase. I don't think that would have been particularly unusual, either. It was clearly a custom job.

    The PDC is great. Should be fun to play with the ROMs.
    I have yet to see a Kim-1 computer that was completely built up and not just a board withg wires running to it. Id love to see photos of your briefcase Kim-1

  8. #18

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    I'll scare up some pics when I get a chance, but it's the KIM under a sheet of Plexiglas connected to a power supply in the box. Just plug it in. There's even a hole drilled out in the plastic for the cassette plug.

    For that matter, I also have a rev A also under an acrylic top in a nice little wood case. I don't think any of mine have the plastic encasing that the machines allegedly used contemporarily (I've seen exactly one of these).
    I use my C128 because I am an ornery, stubborn, retro grouch. -- Bob Masse
    Machine room: http://www.floodgap.com/etc/machines.html

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by ClassicHasClass View Post
    I'll scare up some pics when I get a chance, but it's the KIM under a sheet of Plexiglas connected to a power supply in the box. Just plug it in. There's even a hole drilled out in the plastic for the cassette plug.

    For that matter, I also have a rev A also under an acrylic top in a nice little wood case. I don't think any of mine have the plastic encasing that the machines allegedly used contemporarily (I've seen exactly one of these).
    When I took electronics in high school, they had several KIM-1s which weren't exactly 'encased' in plastic; more like there were pieces of plexiglass over the top and bottom on standoffs, with the sides open. Naturally, the top piece had an opening for the keypad. I never saw any of them in operation; they just sat on shelving near the back of the shop. If only they'd let me take one or more of them home..........

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    Not gonna lie, I am in love. What a find!
    Commodore 128 / 1571 / 1581 / 1351 / MPS 1200 / 1084 Monitor / 64NIC+
    Commodore 64 / 1541-II (x 2)
    Commodore Plus/4 / 1551
    TI-99/4A
    Tandy CoCo 2 / Color Computer Mini-Disk 26-3029 (non-working) / Tandy Modem
    Coleco ADAM / Expansion Module 1

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