Image Map Image Map
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 17

Thread: Found a nice treasure trove in my childhood home...

  1. #1

    Default Found a nice treasure trove in my childhood home...

    So my childhood home is being sold, so I was asked to help clean out the garage, and luckily I stumbled upon a bunch of old computers from my past We're talking Commodore 64, Timex Sinclair 1000, and the 1984 Macintosh. Thing is.. I really don't know if these are worth much but I have no room for them and not sure if I should sell them just yet. Could maybe put them into storage, but not so easy as I live in NYC. Anyone think these will be worth much in years to come? Or are they at the peak of their nostalgia?

  2. #2

    Default

    Man, those are definitely worth hanging on to! They will be worth a fair bit in years to come, maybe when future generations laugh at our old school tech I guess if you put them into storage, then do some real research and ask collectors if they are worth much now. Would be a big shame to just let them sitting around or give away for free

  3. #3

    Default

    All three are pretty common and not exceedingly valuable. Sell them I would say.

  4. #4

    Default

    I mean... the C64 seems to be worth selling right now, I don't think we can know of a "peak" beforehand but they seem expensive to me. They're certainly not worth going through a bunch of effort to put into storage, if you don't have room for them as you say. I personally really dislike the Timex 1000, though don't know if anyone else wants to defend it.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
    Location
    Los Angeles, CA
    Posts
    675

    Default

    Yeah, pretty common systems, none of them will ever be worth what you'll spend in storage fees. To be fair, the timex 1000 and c64 are pretty small, they don't really take much more space then some books... But if they're not of interest to you to keep, then now is as good a time as any to let them go.
    -- Brian

    Systems: Amstad PCW 8256, Apple IIe/II+/Mac+/Mac 512k, Atari 800/520STFM, Commodore 64/Amiga 3000/PET 4032/SX-64, IBM PS/1 2121-B82, Kaypro II, Osborne 1, Tandy 1000 SX, TI-99/4A, TRS-80 Model 4 GA

  6. Default

    Hmm, somehow I just have a feeling that these PCs will be useful in the future somehow! Can't explain it, but just can't get rid of tech like that. What if a museum wants it in the year 2050 or something? My main worry is how they will be stored. Want to be sure they are safe and sound. This page got me interested, but does anyone know if the PCs will be ok in the NYC heat during summer? I'm pretty sure the rooms are climate controlled, but wonder if anyone had heard of melting PCs :/

  7. #7

    Default

    Sounds a little expensive, but you could do that if you want! If you sell them, they might also make it to 2050, and you don't have to pay storage fees PCs can melt as it were - plastics can break down and rubber will definitely melt - but probably not in a climate controlled setting.

  8. #8

    Default

    You need tp make note of value in any cmos memory. Also make copies of BIOS eprom, flash, whatever. Remove any batteries!!! Store in a dark low humidity place.
    Dwight

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Portsmouth, England
    Posts
    257

    Default

    In 2050 the microchips will be around seventy years old, will ANY of them still work?
    Probably not worth the cost of storage, especially if there is an EMP in the next 30 years.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Location
    Cleveland, OH, USA
    Posts
    887

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by toastingderbyshire View Post
    Hmm, somehow I just have a feeling that these PCs will be useful in the future somehow! Can't explain it, but just can't get rid of tech like that. What if a museum wants it in the year 2050 or something? My main worry is how they will be stored. Want to be sure they are safe and sound. This page got me interested, but does anyone know if the PCs will be ok in the NYC heat during summer? I'm pretty sure the rooms are climate controlled, but wonder if anyone had heard of melting PCs :/
    The problem with storing equipment is similar to storage of an antique car: This is a product that was designed to be used and that tends to deteriorate with disuse. Some of the components in your old computers have a definite shelf life, particularly true of batteries and electrolytic capacitors. And they don't just die quietly; they often leak their corrosive guts all over the copper "traces" of the motherboard. Old disks deteriorate with age as well. Commodore and Sinclair were "built cheap" to meet a mass-market price point, and there were a lot of them sold.

    Old computers are worth whatever anyone wants to pay for them. There may be a "going rate" but even that varies widely. If these relics of your past bring pleasant memories with their use then save them and use them for the sake of your amusement. If not, pass them on to someone else. As George Harrison noted: "All things must pass." And we know what happened to him...

    -CH-

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •