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Thread: Can anyone identify this "frame buffer"?

  1. #11
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    I'd also be surprised if there wasn't at least 1 aftermarket card for the PC that sported the 7220. The 6845/6545 was more versatile then one might suspect, given CGA graphics in particular was so blase'. IBM should have designed the CGA with an upgrade path in mind. But they rarely ever took my advice.

  2. #12
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    William Donzelli auctioned it off bloody years ago, iirc 2007. I suppose I could ask him. If he even remembers.

  3. #13
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    So if I took a sharp screw driver say, would I be able to pry the cover off of the 7220?

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by KC9UDX View Post
    Isn't that what the Rainbow used?

    IIRC, it's not really suitable for multiple displays. I'm stumped by the 6 connectors too. 5 would make sense, but there's no good reason to substitute RCAs for BNCs (or even TNCs). Even if it's used for overlay, it would be pretty bizarre to have that many connectors.
    6 could make sense. Some Japanese computers output R, G, and B, separately, so this could be 2 x RGB out, though I doubt it...

  5. #15
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    With sync on green? Incidentally the irregular spacing on the bottom 2 outputs? that someone mentioned is due to a bracket.

  6. #16

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    It's a Number9 computer Revolution 512x32 card. One plug for each R/G/B and V/H sync. Don't remember what the manual said about the 6th plug, but might be external sync for the optional genlock expansion module.

    It should be able to sync on green according to the manual, but it has to be configured to do so (int sync instead of ext sync)
    Current systems owned by me:
    Vintage:IBM PC/XT submodel 087 ( 1983 ), [Kon]tiki-100 rev. C (1983), Compaq Portable I ( 1984 ), IBM PC/XT submodel 078 ( 1985 ), IBM PC/XT286 ( ~1986 ), 3x Nintendo Entertainement Systems ( 1987 ).
    Obsolete:Commodore A500 ( ~1990 ), IBM PS/2 model 70/386 type 8570-161 ( 1991 ), Atari Lynx II ( ~1992 ), Generic Intel 486SX PC ( ~1993 ), AT/T Globalyst Pentium w/FDIV bug MB ( 1994 ), Compaq 486DX4 laptop ( ~1995 ).

  7. #17
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    This is a Number9 Revolution??? And it's stand alone? Where is the firmware? Is it going to work in my Wang?

  8. #18
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    Ok I see your posts from 6 years ago:

    http://www.vcfed.org/forum/showthrea...identify/page4

    Are drivers required? Does all the code reside in software? Do you have it? I notice there are about a dozen pals, all socketed. The memory isn't recognizable, presumably the 32 in the model number. Ok weirdo dram ick. A few static ram and f/a converters. Everything else is mundane.

  9. #19

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    One of the PALs decide on the memory mapping, which might possibly overlap with VGA or CGA or even the top part of conventional memory.

    When it comes to using the card, you probably need to setup the uPD7220 registers and write to the framebuffer RAM and palette. The 512x32 does not support hardware graphics plotting.

    I can try to dig up through the manual. I also found some diagnostics programs and drivers through the web wayback machine, but be advised that the card might perhaps not work if the computer/ISA-bus is too fast. Also, most programs supporting such cards are usually hard-coded to use them as a secondary display or has dedicated drivers on a per-program basis. These cards were never intended as a primary all-purpose graphics card.
    Current systems owned by me:
    Vintage:IBM PC/XT submodel 087 ( 1983 ), [Kon]tiki-100 rev. C (1983), Compaq Portable I ( 1984 ), IBM PC/XT submodel 078 ( 1985 ), IBM PC/XT286 ( ~1986 ), 3x Nintendo Entertainement Systems ( 1987 ).
    Obsolete:Commodore A500 ( ~1990 ), IBM PS/2 model 70/386 type 8570-161 ( 1991 ), Atari Lynx II ( ~1992 ), Generic Intel 486SX PC ( ~1993 ), AT/T Globalyst Pentium w/FDIV bug MB ( 1994 ), Compaq 486DX4 laptop ( ~1995 ).

  10. #20
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    Anything you can dig up would be GREATLY appreciated. I actually wanted one of these cards for a long time. How ironic (or numb skullish) that it was right under my nose. Didn't even know much about them LOL. The name sounded cool
    I hadn't realized until quite recently it was named after a Beatles song. I had thought the name bespoke it's raw power.

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