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Thread: Militarized PDP11

  1. #1

    Default Militarized PDP11

    Just came across this ad for a militarized version of a PDP 11/70 from Norden. Anyone knows anything about it?

    Norder.jpg

    Source: https://books.google.es/books?id=wuO...page&q&f=false

  2. #2
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    Looks like Norden made a military version of the VAX too.
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  3. #3
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    See this for the Norden mil version of the 11/34: http://www.computerhistory.org/visib...mage/img-3287/

    When I was at DEC working on the 11/60 in the late seventies we met several times with Norden engineering folks who were also looking to do a mil version of the 11/60.

    I believe there was also a mil version of the LSI-11 that was sold by Norden. There are Norden ads for the LSI-11M and PDP-11/34M online, google NORDEN PDP-11.

    Don
    Last edited by AK6DN; January 7th, 2019 at 09:48 AM.

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    This is my Rolm 1602 Nova that was used in lots of military systems. They were used for decoding radar transponders and displaying the information on radar display along with ECM systems identifying threats and deploying countermeasures.
    They operated with the same code as the regular Data General Nova.


    IMG_0139.jpg

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    The RICM has 3x AN/AYK-14 military computers. We were told that they came from an F-14, and that they would run the same instructions as an early CDC machine. We haven't powered them on yet.
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  6. #6

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    Very nice information guys, it wonderful to discover new product branches and uses. Looking at the pictures of these systems it called my attention how packed and tight everything is, temperature and cooling must had been an issue.

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    Quote Originally Posted by edcross View Post
    Looking at the pictures of these systems it called my attention how packed and tight everything is, temperature and cooling must had been an issue.
    These ATR systems are designed for low power consumption. The PCBs have an aluminum or copper core that conducts heat from the ICs to the aluminum chassis. There are Wedge Loks to clamp the edge of the PCBs to the chassis to provide mechanical strength and to improve the heat conduction. Modern ATR chassis have fins on the outside and no fans, so the amount of power that can be used is limited. Using low power ICs and power management you can get a surprising amount of computing done with very little power.

    The CDC chassis at the RICM have radiator fins inside the outer surface of the chassis and fans in the back to pull air through the fins. This increases power dissipation capability at the expense of lower reliability. In an aircraft there is usually plenty of very cold air to cool the electronics. On one project that I worked on we had to mix warm air with the -70F fresh air so the electronics would not go below -30F.

    I have also seen ATR chassis that circulate liquid coolant, usually water & glycol, through passages in the outside of the chassis. The liquid cooled chassis can handle very high power.
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