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Thread: Whats The Best Windows 10 Software For Scanning Floppy Disks For Errors

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stone View Post
    It most certainly is if you you want ease, simplicity and reliable results but don't care to delve into that cryptic Unix stuff.
    Or that cryptic DOS or Windows stuff?

    I assume that the OP wanted to know about Win10 because s/he's using a USB floppy. Advice: get rid of the thing.

    If you want to make sure that a formatted floppy has no unrecoverable errors, you can simply take a DOS utility such as rawread and read the whole thing. Maybe it will even write the result to nul, so you don't have to delete the output file. Under Windows 9x, "scandisk a: /surface" should do the trick.
    Last edited by Chuck(G); January 10th, 2019 at 04:18 PM.

  2. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by Chuck(G) View Post
    Or that cryptic DOS or i̶n̶d̶o̶w̶s̶ stuff?
    OK, point taken, cryptic is relative.
    PM me if you're looking for 3" or 5" floppy disks. EMail For everything else, Take Another Step

  3. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by 2icebitn View Post
    With old disks with content, pay careful attention. DO NOT EVER do a directory search or anything like that. Simply insert the disk and IMAGE it. Sometimes you only get one shot and that's the truth. Subsequently the disk may be unreadable. A very good imaging program is ImageDisk by Dave Dunfield. Or you can go the Catweasel/Kryoflux/CopyIIPC route.
    Thanks for the tip! I've just purchased a couple of old DOS games that should be arriving in the post any day now so I shall follow that advice! This kind of thing is why I joined the forum, I'm always looking for tips from peoples own experience with vintage and retro computing


    Quote Originally Posted by Chuck(G) View Post
    I assume that the OP wanted to know about Win10 because s/he's using a USB floppy. Advice: get rid of the thing.
    I wont be getting rid of the thing, but I wont be using it for anything retro/vintage so thanks for the tip
    My personal blog: www.retrocomputing.co.uk

  4. #14
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    The other issue is copy protection, especially with games. The fly in the ointment ...

  5. #15

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    It sounds to me that the USB drive and the 100x floppy disks are working exactly as they should - random errors and loss of work scattered liberally throughout the media set.

  6. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by FazzaGBR View Post
    I wont be getting rid of the thing, but I wont be using it for anything retro/vintage so thanks for the tip
    You can use a USB floppy drive for reading anything you want to without fear of data loss, corruption, etc. Just be sure whatever you put into it is write protected.

    Also, writing to new or blank disks is always safe. Nothing to lose or corrupt there. I used to do that regularly to transfer stuff to my tweener but lately I've stopped using floppies for that and rely on a USB stick instead. Having USB access in DOS makes that my preferred method.
    PM me if you're looking for 3" or 5" floppy disks. EMail For everything else, Take Another Step

  7. #17
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    I suppose a USB 3.5" floppy drive is better than nothing, but I'm not a fan of the things. Every one I've seen is a slimline (i.e. not very rugged) unit priced toward the bottom end, with very limited capabilities. I've run across "1.44M" ones that are completely ignorant of 720K media, for example.

  8. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by Chuck(G) View Post
    I suppose a USB 3.5" floppy drive is better than nothing, but I'm not a fan of the things. Every one I've seen is a slimline (i.e. not very rugged) unit priced toward the bottom end, with very limited capabilities. I've run across "1.44M" ones that are completely ignorant of 720K media, for example.
    I've got a couple and they're both fine with 720k disks.

    One is a SmartDisk which is actually a TEAC and the other is a LaCie which is a Y-E Data.
    PM me if you're looking for 3" or 5" floppy disks. EMail For everything else, Take Another Step

  9. #19
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    ...and I have a NEC which won't. What's your point?

  10. #20
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    Isn't that rather the problem with floppy drives in general? About 10 years ago, drives supporting only the 1.44MB format became the default. So one can buy an aged drive that supports only 1.44MB or an even older drive the supports 720kB and 1.44MB, or an incredibly old USB drive that supports 720 kB and 1.44MB plus some of the Japanese formats and possibly even exotics like DMF.

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