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Thread: When will Windows XP finally become abandonware?

  1. #1

    Question When will Windows XP finally become abandonware?

    Hello!
    So I was wondering: Windows XP official support ended on July 8, 2014 (At least the extended support, mainstream had ended in 2009), but for some reason, as far as I know, Windows XP is not abandonware yet, supposedly because it still supports some software, and mainly because one of XP's incarnations, POSready 2009, is still suported to this day.
    Another problem is product activation. Some day MS will stop allowing XP activations, and that's going to be a huge problem, specially for those who want to use XP in the future for historical/nostalgia purposes (Just as we do today with Win9x)

    Anyway, the question here is, when will XP become abandonware? Will it be a problem to use it in the future?

  2. #2

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    Considering how much of it there is in military, health care, and industrial I think it will be around and quietly supported where needed for a very long time to come, maybe even decades.

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    Abandonware does not mean free to use, copy and distribute. It merely means software that is no longer supported or updated by the company or people who make it. So I am not sure that it matters if/when XP becomes abandonware or not. Microsoft is still supporting it and making security updates for it, but on a VERY limited case by case basis (and not free or available to the general public), so technically it's still a current OS, just not mainstream.

    But to answer your question, I'd guess we could call XP abandonware now, thought it may take a few more years for that to be the consensus.

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    I don't even know what abandonware is, at least from a legal standpoint. From a corporate-work standpoint, assuming XP came out around 2001 (I can't remember), it should be PD around the end of the century.

    I use XP POSReady and support won't be dropped on that until April of this year.
    Last edited by Chuck(G); January 10th, 2019 at 02:37 PM.

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    There is no such thing, at least in Copyright terms as "Abandonware". If the Copyright owner is know but refuses to communicate then you can't legally copy the work and the owner can sue you if you do.

    If the owner can't be traced then it becomes an "Orphan Work". In the UK these can be copied with a licence....

    https://www.gov.uk/guidance/copyright-orphan-works

    Copyright lasts longer than most of our lifetimes, between 95 and 120 years. In addition as Microsoft has published service packs which will count as major updates and reset the copyright date. SP3 was released 2008 so XP SP3 will become public domain 2128. So basically most software that was every copyright will continue to be copyright for effectively ever....
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    If the US government is still around to do it, surely they will extend copyright at least another hundred years. Copyrights for all intents and purposes have become perpetual.

    I recently found out how Windows 2000 is still sort of usable. If I still used software that required it but didn't work in XP, I'd probably go through the trouble to use it. Fortunately I don't have to. The only one I'm stuck with indefinitely is XP.

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    They didn't this last time--you can now re-print and arrange "Barney Google" and "Yes! We have no Bananas" as of the first of this year. I think Mickey's "Steamboat Willie" becomes PD in 2023.

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    Default Title!

    Quote Originally Posted by Alexvar View Post
    Anyway, the question here is, when will XP become abandonware?
    You are asking on completely the wrong forum. Nobody on this site deals with software on the basis of abandonment. Those sites that do, have their own differing opinions and safety margins.

    Quote Originally Posted by Alexvar View Post
    Will it be a problem to use it in the future?
    Yes. Anything that includes activation will eventually become impossible to install or re-install. Many software titles have already fallen victim to this sort of problems. Your software disk is now just a shiny coaster.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Chuck(G) View Post
    They didn't this last time--you can now re-print and arrange "Barney Google" and "Yes! We have no Bananas" as of the first of this year. I think Mickey's "Steamboat Willie" becomes PD in 2023.
    I'm sure it was just an oversight and it will get extended retroactively. They have been a little preoccupied lately with some wall thing.

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    It may well be the case of toothpaste and the tube. Maybe they'll save Mickey, but the 1923 stuff is already out of the tube.

    About the only time I can recall "backsies" on copyright was the case of the "restored copyright" for works penned in the Soviet Union. All of Shostakovitch used to be PD in the US, but our copyright law was amended to allow letters of "exception" to be filed for a period of a couple of years, to put things under copyright. No, the copyright cops aren't going to come and confiscate your copy of his "Leningrad" symphony, but you can't legally republish it without permission from some German outfit that currently owns the copyright. I assume that you'll also have to cross somebody's palm with silver.

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