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Thread: I really want to get rid of my Lisa II - Tips on selling?

  1. #1

    Default I really want to get rid of my Lisa II - Tips on selling?

    Aloha!

    I have an Apple Lisa II 2/10 computer I've owned for the last 25 years. It works, but with a few exceptions... It has the 10MB widget hard drive, but it is not functional. The computer can boot up if I connect my Mac Floppy Emu to it. The floppy drive is still in it, but I doubt it works. The Lisa does not have any modifications, such as the video mod or Mac XL upgraded ROMs. And, it doesn't have any memory boards installed, as I believe when I tried installing a 512K memory board, the computer would not boot properly, so there may be some problems with the backplane or the memory board? There is no burn-in on the CRT. The 1.8A power supply was re-capped by John at Vintage Micros about 15 years ago. I still have the silkscreen video piece that mounts over the CRT. I have the keyboard, and it may need to be refurbished with new capacitive key pads. I also have a mouse, but it a Mac 128/Plus model. The chassis is in great condition, but it is extremely browned like most Apple equipment of its time.

    The challenge is that I live in Hawaii, and no one here locally is interested in this computer. This is one huge boat anchor to ship by air to the mainland U.S. It is also a major challenge to mail something this large and this heavy, and still guarantee no damage when it arrives.

    Would it be better to sell the system as a whole, and take a chance in shipping as one unit? Or, take it apart and sell it by the piece? If shipped in one piece, what's the best way to pack this system? I would think any cardboard box would not withstand the torture during shipment.

  2. #2
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    If you ship the machine, you'll definitely want to face it down to protect the CRT neck from snapping in a drop. Get a box that is probably 6" bigger on all sides than the machine and pack it with semi-rigid foam on all sides (including the bottom.) You'll then want to put that box inside another even larger box with more packing material. This will give it the best chance of survival, along with lots of shipping insurance and declaring it fragile.

    Writing large instructions on the box may help as well, like declaring which side of the box must remain upright, do not stack and do not drop.

    Shipping alone would likely be on the order of $200-300 depending on the carrier and how much insurance you buy for it.

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    Get a box that is probably 6" bigger on all sides than the machine and pack it with semi-rigid foam on all sides (including the bottom.)
    I would suggest for an item such as this that semi-rigid foam be substituted with Instapak. It costs more but this is an item where a buyer will pay the premium for perfect-fit packaging.
    = Excellent space heater

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    I don't know where you are, but if shipping within the US use USPS. I realize I'll be branded a socialist, but I have bloody years of experience (and let me tell you they were bloody). I never had a problem with USPS. I have had many problems with FEDAXE, and though none to speak of with UPS, I'd generally go with USPS, and they always seem to be cheaper. The fact that USPS doesn't handle as many parcels is actually a good thing, as they don't treat them with contempt LOL.

    Anyway my recommendation is soft foam slabs, the kind you find in dumpsters behind Pier 1 Imports and the like. With a Lisa you have those feet in front which could be a little worrisome. But 4"+ of soft foam will allow it to be springy. I'm a little queasy of facing the tube down, as no manufacturer ever shipped them that way, not even bare CRTs. I can sort of understand the logic, and it is said TRS-80 model 4s suffer from neck breakage frequently when shipped. Use your best judgment. But the soft springy foam slabs, not peanuts, is the way to go if you ask me.

    If you were thinking of a way to orient the unit for shipping so as to protect the tube, maybe face up or tube end of unit up (I.e sideways) might be the way to go. I shipped a Vicky recently, and I thought it best to point the face of the tube up. Wasn't notified of any problems.

  5. #5
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    The upside of shipping with UPS is that when you drop it off you can pay them to double box it (put your box in a bigger box with packing material, greatly increasing chances of a working unit after shipment).

    That being said, collectors will certainly pay the high shipping you might just get a couple hundred less for the unit itself. You should have no problems selling it.

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    That's the whole point. Doing it yourself saves the buyer and potentially gets you more money. You could always double box it yourself if you think its important. I've made boxes from large pieces of cardboard, using a piece of long pine to make the bends. But if you have enough reliable packing material, I can't really see the point. You will want to put the items in plastic bags though. It looks better and keeps bits of foam out of it.

    Back in 2011 - 2012 I packed up hundreds of items using cast off materials. It became so easy, given I dumpster dived enough and had enough and a variety of material on hand. Lately, and not selling nearly as much stuff, it's a pain in the took is. I'm older and more cranky being the reason I guess. But if you're under 45 especially, don't be a wuss and pack it yourself LOL. This does require the availability of suitable dumpster material though.

    I guess maybe the logic of double boxing stuff is so you can use peanuts. An items with just peanuts stands a chance of wiggling down to the box bottom and could take a hit if dropped. A unit inside it's own carton is far leas likely to move at all. You could also facilitate this by simply putting g a thin layer of cardboard underneath the unit, if all you have is peanuts. But everything needs to be tight as a drum, as it'll be less likely to move, and do not skimp on tape. I buy stuff from my Indian doar store up the block, for a dollar, and it works fine. As long as you aren't cheap with it. But the best material is soft foam slabs far and away. Perhaps you can work out a deal with a proprietor to save you the stuff before it gets dumpsterized.

  7. #7
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    Sealed Air InstaPak-RT is definitely a good choice for packing any fragile, high-value item. I use it all the time for work, and will use it for particularly fragile hobby shipments too (CRT monitors, things with brittle plastic, etc.).

    Advice so far is solid. Double-wall box, double box it if you feel it's necessary, pack well with rigid foam or InstaPak.

    I'd personally use UPS for anything as large as a Lisa. The USPS will typically do OK, but local branches may have trouble with the bigger box. I have our local post office hold anything particularly large as I know one of the letter carriers has a hard time with larger boxes. I feel UPS is generally better equipped for medium-big stuff, though don't ship anything *really* big with them unless it's going freight.

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    I'm familiar with the phrase "hold for pickup", though what it entails precisely I don't know. I'm thinking you can specify a parcel gets held at the po until picked up maybe?

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    Quote Originally Posted by 2icebitn View Post
    I'm familiar with the phrase "hold for pickup", though what it entails precisely I don't know. I'm thinking you can specify a parcel gets held at the po until picked up maybe?
    Yeah, they leave a note in the mailbox, the package never leaves the post office with a letter carrier. I've just told them, "anything big," and let them judge that for themselves.

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    So the recipient specifies things to be held? I guess that would be obvious. But I had thought it's up to the po to hold or deliver.

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