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Thread: Changing computer recycling laws

  1. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by Unknown_K View Post
    Anything that gets hoarded is something that has not been recycled and even if it all gets recycled at a later date there is a good possibility that somebody will harvest parts or whole systems that will end up in somebodies collection. Granted some people don't house their hoards very well and eventually it will all just be rust.
    So, it's not necessarily that I have a problem with hoarders (okay, maybe i do), but I just feel like if it made it all the way to the recycling center as things should, then i'm not sure i'm up for pulling it out then because it may never get properly recycled later. If it's a collectible, sure.. but if it's some guy who thinks he can save a rusty Dell Pentium machine with missing screws and a bashed case, only to hoard it while he tries to sell it for $500 on ebay as 'vintage'.. when he eventually dies all his stuff may not make it to the recycling center then and it'll just wind up buried in a landfill. (I mean, i know i'm guilty of throwing old computers away in the past that could have been recycled but i just had no idea how and i didn't have the time or inclination to even figure it out.. most people don't.. like how many people properly recycle standard household batteries?).

    I guess the short version is that I can see both sides of this.

    Maybe the answer is to not just let anyone pull anything from recycling centers, but add an class where 'refurbishment' businesses can take these machines and properly refurbish them for resale while taking into account proper data ethics, etc. These people will have the proper experience and follow through to know what machines need to be saved and which ones should be recycled, etc?
    -- Brian

    Working Retro PC's: Apple IIe/II+, Atari 800, Atari 520STFM, Commodore 64, Commodore Amiga 3000, Commodore SX-64, IBM PS/1 2121-B82, Kaypro II, Tandy 1000 SX, TI-99/4A, TRS-80 Model 4 GA

  2. #52
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    I got news for you, all those old 486 systems that got tossed in the trash back in the day DID end up in a landfill. Anything left on the curb today will probably be taken by a scrapper and actually recycled (if not parted and resold), if not the city will recycle it. It has taken a long time for communities to even think about recycling instead of just landfilling all waste. Why do you think somebody can dig a hole in a landfill and find Atari 2600 carts in usable condition?

    You kind of miss the point about what is junk now will be collectable down the road, the only difference is time passing.

    I think it just boils down to people having some kind of issue about somebody else trying to make money off of their hobby driving up prices. I suppose if all DELL Pentiums got recycled after they were obsolete the one you have will be worth more money down the road?
    What I collect: 68K/Early PPC Mac, DOS/Win 3.1 era machines, Amiga/ST, C64/128
    Nubus/ISA/VLB/MCA/EISA cards of all types
    Boxed apps and games for the above systems
    Analog video capture cards/software and complete systems

  3. #53

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    Quote Originally Posted by ngtwolf View Post
    Maybe the answer is to not just let anyone pull anything from recycling centers, but add an class where 'refurbishment' businesses can take these machines and properly refurbish them for resale while taking into account proper data ethics, etc. These people will have the proper experience and follow through to know what machines need to be saved and which ones should be recycled, etc?
    The market is so incredibly small, it's just not worth the bother. A bit like Routemaster buses, plenty enough is preserved already.

  4. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by Unknown_K View Post
    I got news for you, all those old 486 systems that got tossed in the trash back in the day DID end up in a landfill. Anything left on the curb today will probably be taken by a scrapper and actually recycled (if not parted and resold), if not the city will recycle it. It has taken a long time for communities to even think about recycling instead of just landfilling all waste. Why do you think somebody can dig a hole in a landfill and find Atari 2600 carts in usable condition?

    You kind of miss the point about what is junk now will be collectable down the road, the only difference is time passing.

    I think it just boils down to people having some kind of issue about somebody else trying to make money off of their hobby driving up prices. I suppose if all DELL Pentiums got recycled after they were obsolete the one you have will be worth more money down the road?
    Nah, I get your point, I'm just not sure what the answer is and I'm not sure if hoarding is it either.

    They can have the dell (dual core, not pentium), I picked it up because it had a floppy and thought it would support old floppy drives but it didn't, and then I couldn't find anyone to pawn it off on (like many other things i'm sadly hoarding) but luckily it came in handy finally for working on the amiga SCSI drive since it had XP which is what my scsi card required. As an aside, I don't really care what stuff is worth, I collect stuff because I enjoy it and want to use the machines. I give away stuff I can't use (usually it comes with other stuff i pick up at the same time). The only time I sell stuff is if my local collecting friends don't need it and I really need to clear some space. For instance, there was a full original NES the other day with games, guns, controllers, etc. at the local thrift store for $35... I had no interest in an NES (not my nostalgia). I could buy it just because it's valuable on ebay and either hoard it or resell it, but honestly I don't need the money and I'd rather spend my limited free time on stuff I enjoy so i left it behind for some other 'lucky' patron.
    -- Brian

    Working Retro PC's: Apple IIe/II+, Atari 800, Atari 520STFM, Commodore 64, Commodore Amiga 3000, Commodore SX-64, IBM PS/1 2121-B82, Kaypro II, Tandy 1000 SX, TI-99/4A, TRS-80 Model 4 GA

  5. #55
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    Scrapping is a lot better then letting stuff rust in the land fill as well.

    To me any bigger sapping place should have a small retail department, given the price some parts go for these days your money ahead selling the parts then you are to scrap them. And who knows maybe they can save a few rare systems.
    But the kind of systems scrappers mostly get or mostly newer OEM junk. Like dells and HPs from the mid to late 00s. Stuff that would likely never hold any real value, even in anther 20-30 years.
    I have dyslexia, I have alot of trouble putting my thoughts into words and spelling/grammar is something I struggle with.
    You may need to read my posts twice to understand what I said.

  6. #56
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    The local recycler does just that--they have a storefront for the better stuff. I've seen SGI gear, HP wide plotters, etc. on sale. What they tend to concentrate on is budget systems for the economically disadvantaged.

  7. #57
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    The local defunct scrapper here had a storefront that would sell refurbed Dells to people with no credit. He would also make money fixing broken laptop screens. There is still a computer store around that sells older gear and he gets his stuff from a bigger scrapper by the airport. Not sure how they stay in business since you rarely see anyone there. Anybody with a credit card would be better off going through Ebay.

    The 2005 dells and HP's are no different then the old 486 Gateways and Packard Bells which people collect these days. Only difference is the newer dells are all getting scrapped while the older more expensive 486 systems were saved in the attic or garage. I think computer collecting will shift with user preference so while desktops will still be collected by old gamers I think down the road people will be collecting laptops more and good luck with that because they get scrapped as fast as desktops and are harder to repair.
    What I collect: 68K/Early PPC Mac, DOS/Win 3.1 era machines, Amiga/ST, C64/128
    Nubus/ISA/VLB/MCA/EISA cards of all types
    Boxed apps and games for the above systems
    Analog video capture cards/software and complete systems

  8. #58
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    Quote Originally Posted by Unknown_K View Post
    I think down the road people will be collecting laptops
    Talk about a product designed for obsolescence...

    I have a small stack of Powerbook G3s I keep around because they were the last model with serial and scsi
    that I use when I need something Mac and small, and another stack of the last Dell that had a parallel port
    to run my parallel port prom programmer and talk to my Data I/O Unisite, and another stack of HP i7 probooks
    because they have W7 licenses that I can re-install from DVD.

  9. #59

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    And of course tablets are so cheap even new and need no desk space.

    Intel's lack of progress performance wise in the past five years has resulted in a glut of insanely cheap yet perfectly usable desktop systems, the old recycle grade stuff is just not worth the bother.

    Just my 2p obviously.

  10. #60
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    Intel has had its ups and downs before loosing speed wars with Cyrix, AMD a couple times but I think they are just loosing the war with physics these days. You just can't shrink bits much smaller when you are at the atomic level as it is.
    What I collect: 68K/Early PPC Mac, DOS/Win 3.1 era machines, Amiga/ST, C64/128
    Nubus/ISA/VLB/MCA/EISA cards of all types
    Boxed apps and games for the above systems
    Analog video capture cards/software and complete systems

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