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Thread: Changing computer recycling laws

  1. #1

    Default Changing computer recycling laws

    It's really sad to see so many vintage computers at the dump and recycling centers and you're not allowed to take them home. It's against the law. They won't even let you remove the hard drive in front of them. It makes no sense. There is no way a person's data can be stolen if there's no hard drive in the computer. How about starting an online petition to save these vintage computers before they're all gone?

  2. #2

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    All under the same umbrella now over here " Hazardous Waste " been like it for years, though some recyclers are selling them, Seem's like one rule for us and another for them, Long gone are the days i could take what i wanted from my local dump. Health and safety.

  3. #3
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    They need to be saved long before they get to any "recycler". By that time they have been stripped of any software, manuals, peripherals or other things, and likely have been tossed around and smashed up.

    Problem is you have to change consumertard thinking. Like - Little Miss Millennial found an oooold computer in her daddies attic and it MUST get thrown out becuase it is ooollld, and dangeroooous, full of toooxic chemicals, and its BEIGE, and it has... no... lovely... new... shiny... blue... LEDs! - she knows old is bad because Twitter told her on her brand new pink Apple iPhone(R)(TM).

  4. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by computerdude92 View Post
    It's against the law... How about starting an online petition to save these vintage computers before they're all gone?
    When is the last time a law was enacted or changed because a miniscule percentage (let's say a fraction of 1% to be generous) of the population wanted something done?

    Congress refuses to enact Universal Background Checks or ban Bump Stocks and 70% - 90% of the population are in favor of doing this.

    If you really think any legislator is going to take your request seriously when you merely represent such a tiny minority of the overall population you're obviously not paying attention to what goes on in the rest of the world.
    PM me if you're looking for 3" or 5" floppy disks. EMail For everything else, Take Another Step

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stone View Post
    Congress refuses to enact Universal Background Checks or ban Bump Stocks and 70% - 90% of the population are in favor of doing this.
    Where have you been? Bump Stocks were Banned in December 2018 by the Trump Administration / ATF, and the Law takes effect March 26, 2019.

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by Stone View Post
    When is the last time a law was enacted or changed because a miniscule percentage (let's say a fraction of 1% to be generous) of the population wanted something done?
    Feb. 5, 2019. The US Senate passed a bill to allow states to punish companies that boycott Israel. I'd say about 1% of the population wants that.

    Then there are many examples when a huge percentage of the population wants something and it never happens - like around 90% want GMO labelling, but it never happens.

    But I agree with your main point. Nobody cares about the wishes of a small hobbyist group.

  7. #7
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    As they said in the NAVY, "Common sense has been secured". It will only get worse. I was thinking of adopting a second dog (wifes birthday coming up).
    The woman at the pet shelter actually called me irresponsible for not spaying my existing dog and would therefore not EVER let me have a dog from them. My dog is a purebred German shepherd with a lineage going back 7 generations with the AKC. I intend on breeding her at least once, yet this woman called me an irresponsible owner. I corrected her with "I'm irresponsible?! Isn't every single animal in this facility a result of someones ACTUAL irresponsibility?" but alas , me a married with kids homeowner with a large yard in a remote rural area is somehow a bad fit.

    So I know I went off topic, but STUPIDITY is the order of the Day and that will not change.. not ever I suspect. You want to save some vintage computers... go out and save them as the rest of us do... no one else cares but us... Don't expect them ever to start caring either.

  8. #8
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    I'm a bit conflicted on this one. Where I live, the recycling people take just about anything electronic and employ the developmentally disabled, using both state and Federal funds.

    So, they're not just scrappers; they do some good for the less-advantaged.

    If you want to get something, I think the best approach is to look and advertise your wants.

  9. #9
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    Many years ago I was paid to fix a computer techs (from a local university) dual PPro IBM system and we started talking about what they did with old systems. He told me they were sent to the local jail where the inmates stripped them for recycling. I remember my old school days at that university and wondered what happened to the rooms full of dual floppy IBM 5150's we used to type reports (they were old even when I went there and were recycled shortly after I graduated I think).

    I would say that it takes about 10 years from when a computer is obsolete junk to where somebody even thinks about collecting them. Who is going to store the millions of machines that become obsolete each year and wait a decade or more until a few people want one? Back in the day that a computer was $2000+ people tended to keep them in an attic as a spare when they upgraded if they could not sell them and forgot about them. These days prices for common machines are so cheap that if you don't have a kid to pass it down to it gets recycled or trashed (assuming it even works).

    Some people think recyclers are evil, but they do have to bust their ass to make a profit and quite a few of them are getting out of the business. Lots of bankruptcies going on with recyclers. Then you have the problem with what to do with CRT tubes that nobody will take since the melter quit and plastics that China no longer wants. New motherboards have very little copper and new CPUs don't have any gold so there isn't much profit in them anymore.

    I tend to collect some local machines that are free or cheap to tinker with when they are worthless. I started a thread recently about an IBM P4 Netvista I rescued destined for the trash. Along with the Netvista I snagged 3 core 2 systems one of which I kept intact and the two I kept the motherboard and some parts. The leftovers were picked up maybe 10 minutes after I put them out to the curb early on trash day (was there even $1 in scrap metal there?). One of the core 2 was a quad Q9550 in a decent Intel made board, other was a Dell Optiplex 755 , and another was from a HP system. Do I need core2 boards now, no, but I probably will in 10 years and there won't be that many around and they won't be cheap. SO I washed them, tested them, and on the shelf they go til I need them or somebody else does.

    Most of the laws about not letting people mine the municipal trash areas are to keep meth heads from getting hurt collecting metal and for other types to not mine HDs for personal information for identity theft. Even ten years ago when I was hitting a local recycler that stripped semi loads of computers for others he would not let me have the HDs from system that other large company brought in (and this guy was a little shady to start with) but anything the locals sent was fair game.
    What I collect: 68K/Early PPC Mac, DOS/Win 3.1 era machines, Amiga/ST, C64/128
    Nubus/ISA/VLB/MCA/EISA cards of all types
    Boxed apps and games for the above systems
    Analog video capture cards/software and complete systems

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Unknown_K View Post
    Many years ago I was paid to fix a computer techs (from a local university) dual PPro IBM system and we started talking about what they did with old systems. He told me they were sent to the local jail where the inmates stripped them for recycling. I remember my old school days at that university and wondered what happened to the rooms full of dual floppy IBM 5150's we used to type reports (they were old even when I went there and were recycled shortly after I graduated I think).

    I would say that it takes about 10 years from when a computer is obsolete junk to where somebody even thinks about collecting them. Who is going to store the millions of machines that become obsolete each year and wait a decade or more until a few people want one? Back in the day that a computer was $2000+ people tended to keep them in an attic as a spare when they upgraded if they could not sell them and forgot about them. These days prices for common machines are so cheap that if you don't have a kid to pass it down to it gets recycled or trashed (assuming it even works).

    Some people think recyclers are evil, but they do have to bust their ass to make a profit and quite a few of them are getting out of the business. Lots of bankruptcies going on with recyclers. Then you have the problem with what to do with CRT tubes that nobody will take since the melter quit and plastics that China no longer wants. New motherboards have very little copper and new CPUs don't have any gold so there isn't much profit in them anymore.

    I tend to collect some local machines that are free or cheap to tinker with when they are worthless. I started a thread recently about an IBM P4 Netvista I rescued destined for the trash. Along with the Netvista I snagged 3 core 2 systems one of which I kept intact and the two I kept the motherboard and some parts. The leftovers were picked up maybe 10 minutes after I put them out to the curb early on trash day (was there even $1 in scrap metal there?). One of the core 2 was a quad Q9550 in a decent Intel made board, other was a Dell Optiplex 755 , and another was from a HP system. Do I need core2 boards now, no, but I probably will in 10 years and there won't be that many around and they won't be cheap. SO I washed them, tested them, and on the shelf they go til I need them or somebody else does.

    Most of the laws about not letting people mine the municipal trash areas are to keep meth heads from getting hurt collecting metal and for other types to not mine HDs for personal information for identity theft. Even ten years ago when I was hitting a local recycler that stripped semi loads of computers for others he would not let me have the HDs from system that other large company brought in (and this guy was a little shady to start with) but anything the locals sent was fair game.
    I colleague came to me with a Dell machine and asked if I wanted it. I assumed it was a P4, but turned out to be a duo core... I looked at him and said it had no value to me. And he threw it in the dumpster. Its not worth my time to image it and give it away. It's in that special area where its too old to be desirable but not old enough to have nostalgic value......

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