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Thread: Changing computer recycling laws

  1. #21

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    Several years ago i won an old DMM and a few other bits and bobs on ebah, I contacted the seller as i wanted to pick them up as they were in my home town, Seller replied that i was welcome to pick up but what i'd won was at the seller's father's house who passed away. To cut a long story short i met the seller at his fathers house, There was a skip outside full of smashed up computers - Radio's - Tv's - Scopes and what looked like electronics from old military aircraft, The father was a tech in the RAF and was always bringing home stuff, Parts of old aircraft etc. The sad thing is i got there too late, The house had been cleared and garage and sheds, It was the last skip, I could have cried when they told me what they had scrapped, 300+ old computers, Radio's, Tv's, parts from military aircraft etc. It was a sad drive home.

  2. #22
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    I have little doubt that my widow will do exactly the same thing with my stuff. That's just the way things are.

    You'll note that Don Maslin's widow didn't want to do anything with his material--we had to wait for her passing.

  3. #23

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    You're good with databases. Leave one in your will, name an executor and all your stuff should find its way to wherever you designate.
    PM me if you're looking for 3" or 5" floppy disks. EMail For everything else, Take Another Step

  4. #24
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    You don't get it, do you? My widow will want to be out of this place ASAP after my passing (assuming that it's the way things go). She doesn't want to deal with it--most likely, she'll turn over the house to one of those estate sale outfits and move out with the house and land offered for a quick sale.

  5. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by SomeGuy View Post
    Like - Little Miss Millennial found an oooold computer in her daddies attic and it MUST get thrown out becuase it is ooollld, and dangeroooous, full of toooxic chemicals, and its BEIGE, and it has... no... lovely... new... shiny... blue... LEDs! - she knows old is bad because Twitter told her on her brand new pink Apple iPhone(R)(TM).
    Quote Originally Posted by inotarobot View Post
    How come you are ALMOST correct except its NOT just the Little Miss Millennial its also the DUMB Gaming Boy Millennial, that are equally to blame as it cannot be overclocked, not easy to add water cooling to and its just tooooooo slow, so thouw it out.
    Oh, sure, we millennials are to blame for 70+ years of throwaway consumer culture. Thanks, grandpa(s).

    Every time I come on here thinking it'd be fun to contribute, I'm reminded why I usually don't.

  6. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chuck(G) View Post
    You don't get it, do you? My widow will want to be out of this place ASAP after my passing (assuming that it's the way things go). She doesn't want to deal with it--most likely, she'll turn over the house to one of those estate sale outfits and move out with the house and land offered for a quick sale.
    I would put all the Vintage Computer stuff in your Will and spell out exactly who it is suppose to go to.

    Then make someone you can trust to do the right thing the Executor of Your Will, doing anything with it other than what your wishes are will be a Violation of the Law.

  7. #27
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    If my wife succeeds me, this is a community property state, so there will be no executor.

    Valuation is in the eye of the beholder. Vintage stuff usually is assessed at value zero, unless there's a verifiable proven market value.

    That beer can collection that you've been working on is probably worth nothing on the books; it's only worth whatever someone is willing to pay.

    My wife remembers the passing of a close friend who collected vintage model airplanes. When he died, the widow was beset by other collectors who wanted to dicker values down to zero--when she was trying to get her life back together again after her spouse's passing. Eventually, she had Goodwill haul the collection away--she couldn't take it any more. Believe it or not, I understand the attitude of Don Maslin's wife.

    I have somewhat of a side interest in brass musical instruments. When asked by the surviving spouse if I could sell the deceased's instruments--and being prompted for a value, I'm made to feel like a heel when I give an honest answer. "That isn't what (the late musician) told me"
    Last edited by Chuck(G); February 9th, 2019 at 01:49 PM.

  8. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by xjas View Post
    Oh, sure, we millennials are to blame for 70+ years of throwaway consumer culture. Thanks, grandpa(s).
    I do agree with this, is definitely not just a millennial thing, I'm told by people of all ages (older and younger) that this stuff should just be tossed out. While younger people would be more inclined to not have nostalgia for stuff before their times, they have their own nostalgia for their things. I see them wanting to save stuff that I don't have interest in (Pokemon, for instance). But yeah, this is not specific to a generation.
    -- Brian

    Working Systems: Apple IIe/II+/Mac+/Mac 512k, Atari 800/520STFM, Commodore 64/Amiga 3000/PET 4032/SX-64, IBM PS/1 2121-B82, Kaypro II, Osborne 1, Tandy 1000 SX, TI-99/4A, TRS-80 Model 4 GA
    Project Systems: Amstrad PCW 8256, Kaypro 2/84 (Bad Chips: 81-194, 81-189).

  9. #29
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    Modern musical instruments seem to be much more valuable if you can prove they were played by somebody dead and still very popular (good luck with that).

    As far as any collectable goes try getting an appraisal for insurance reasons and then ask the guy what he would give you for the stuff and you will see an eye opening difference. Most collections are not worth the time to sell outside of maybe a couple cherry picked pieces even if there are hundreds of $100 ebay pieces.
    What I collect: 68K/Early PPC Mac, DOS/Win 3.1 era machines, Amiga/ST, C64/128
    Nubus/ISA/VLB/MCA/EISA cards of all types
    Boxed apps and games for the above systems
    Analog video capture cards/software and complete systems

  10. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by Unknown_K View Post
    Modern musical instruments seem to be much more valuable if you can prove they were played by somebody dead and still very popular (good luck with that)..
    Yeah, that one--I know of a fellow who valued his tuba (not an uncommon model, BTW) at $30K because it had belonged to one of the guys (there were several) who played in Lawrence Welk's orchestra. I valued it at about $1500 because few remember who Lawrence Welk was and even fewer could name his tuba players.

    Do you think Apple I boards would go for 6 figures if it weren't for the cult of Jobs? Do you think they'll command the same prices in 40 years?

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