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Thread: Mac Classic Analog Board - Low Voltage Problems

  1. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by ngtwolf View Post
    I think the uses for WD-40 are over exaggerated sometimes.
    https://www.verywellhealth.com/can-w...thritis-189148

  2. #32

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    I can find out tonight if WD-40 is harmful to IC pins and IC sockets with a high level of certainty. I have two experimental pcb's each with over 60 IC's on them. The sockets are round gold machine pin type and all the IC's were nos when fitted nearly exactly 3 years ago. WD-40 was applied to all the IC pin sockets to reduce friction as many had to be plugged in and out a few times. I will inspect these today under high magnification and report my findings shortly.

  3. #33
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    Hah.. well, that actually sounds like it would work... if you're the tin man in wizard of oz.
    -- Brian

    Working Systems: Apple IIe/II+/Mac+/Mac 512k, Atari 800/520STFM, Commodore 64/Amiga 3000/PET 4032/SX-64, IBM PS/1 2121-B82, Kaypro II, Osborne 1, Tandy 1000 SX, TI-99/4A, TRS-80 Model 4 GA
    Project Systems: Amstrad PCW 8256, Kaypro 2/84 (Bad Chips: 81-194, 81-189).

  4. #34

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    OK I just inspected the two pcb's, one is vintage 2015 and the other was much older than I had remembered 2003!

    There is no obvious physical trace of the WD-40 on the IC pins and sockets, it is as though it has evaporated. I can just barely smell a hint of it on the 2015 pcb. All the IC pins on both boards remain free of corrosion and looking down into the sockets with magnification, which were once filled with a pool of WD-40 are bright and shiny. Some corrosion has occurred on some nickel plated brass thumb nuts and the metal body of a crystal, but these did not have WD-40 applied. So I'm convinced WD-40 is safe for IC's and sockets, but it does not last forever either and presumably the higher molecular weight hydrocarbons just evaporated away over time. It seems much like my vintage radio chassis where it is a tad oily when it is just applied, but a couple of years later it has apparently vanished.

  5. #35
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    Interesting. Doesn't sound too surprising to me, though. I wouldn't use WD-40 myself, but not because i think there is inherently something bad about using it.

    I guess for me it's like when I'm refurbing drives on new systems i pick up. i have some generic oil i use to lube the rails and stuff. I use it just because it's what i have and it does the job at the time, but i know that using litheum grease would be a better longer term approach. Unless you're really all-in on the hobby, sometimes you just work with what you got vs buying the perfect thing for each situation.

    Amusingly, i don't actually have any wd-40 so whenever i need something that normally would call for wd-40, i use whatever else i have on hand (like garage door chain stuff, can of cheap oil, etc).

    For motherboards, i pretty much stick to IPA, spray contact cleaner and deoxit, depending on what I'm doing.
    -- Brian

    Working Systems: Apple IIe/II+/Mac+/Mac 512k, Atari 800/520STFM, Commodore 64/Amiga 3000/PET 4032/SX-64, IBM PS/1 2121-B82, Kaypro II, Osborne 1, Tandy 1000 SX, TI-99/4A, TRS-80 Model 4 GA
    Project Systems: Amstrad PCW 8256, Kaypro 2/84 (Bad Chips: 81-194, 81-189).

  6. #36

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    Quote Originally Posted by ngtwolf View Post

    For motherboards, i pretty much stick to IPA, spray contact cleaner and deoxit, depending on what I'm doing.
    A very good product to put on gold contacts is Caig Chemicals pro gold, I use that rather than deoxit, but they are similar.

    One use WD-40 has is to protect metalwork you are using from corrosion from the sweat of finger marks handling it. After you have finished the work it can be wiped down, or easily removed with CO contact cleaner or similar made by CRC. Finger marks are easy to leave especially on zinc plated steel and aluminium, copper & brass. The other way it to wear cotton gloves which was popular in Japanese factories in the past.

    There is an interesting flow chart for WD-4o and duct tape to fix every broken machine:

    Does it move ? yes or no.

    Should it move ? yes or no

    If it moves and it shouldn't you use duct tape. If it doesn't move and it should, you use WD-40 !

  7. #37

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    On my old clocks that I get sprayed with WD-40, they often have steel nuts on brass frames. Around the nut the WD-40 has turned green. The nut has a reddish tint in the WD-40. While I can only assume that this is caused by corrosion, one of the fellows has pictures of the pitting when seen under a microscope of pivots damaged by WD-40. He, like you, thought he was protecting the metal by a coat of WD-40. He had to resurface the pivots.
    Finger oil is highly corrosive. Most any oil will protect the surface. Brass takes finger prints easily as well so I know what you are talking about.
    I have a copy of that poster on my wall at the office.
    Dwight

  8. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dwight Elvey View Post
    On my old clocks that I get sprayed with WD-40, they often have steel nuts on brass frames. Around the nut the WD-40 has turned green. The nut has a reddish tint in the WD-40
    The green is some form of copper corrosion, usually cupric acetate or copper(II) chloride. The former is mildly toxic and shouldn't be handled. Brown is usually copper oxide, which forms the tarnish on copper/brass/bronze.

    It's not a good idea to use WD-40 as a long term lubricant or protective coating because its full of light petroleum distillates which have a high vapor pressure. Most of it will evaporate within a day and leave a gummy residue that sticks around for longer, but also will eventually evaporate. If you need a long term lubricant, I'd recommend some form of light machine oil, like 3-n-1 oil.

  9. #39

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    Quote Originally Posted by GiGaBiTe View Post
    It's not a good idea to use WD-40 as a long term lubricant or protective coating because its full of light petroleum distillates which have a high vapor pressure. Most of it will evaporate within a day and leave a gummy residue that sticks around for longer, but also will eventually evaporate. If you need a long term lubricant, I'd recommend some form of light machine oil, like 3-n-1 oil.
    Yes I'm in agreement with that, WD-40 is a poor long term lubricant (perhaps a reasonable short term one), all of my experiences with it shows it tends to completely evaporate, given enough time, which appears to be in the order of some months to a year for the higher MW components to evaporate, so if lubrication is required machine oil is much better.

  10. #40

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dwight Elvey View Post
    On my old clocks that I get sprayed with WD-40, they often have steel nuts on brass frames. Around the nut the WD-40 has turned green. The nut has a reddish tint in the WD-40. While I can only assume that this is caused by corrosion, one of the fellows has pictures of the pitting when seen under a microscope of pivots damaged by WD-40. He, like you, thought he was protecting the metal by a coat of WD-40. He had to resurface the pivots.
    Finger oil is highly corrosive. Most any oil will protect the surface. Brass takes finger prints easily as well so I know what you are talking about.
    I have a copy of that poster on my wall at the office.
    Dwight
    I find this very worrying. I am going to verify this with an experiment. If I can replicate it I'll probably use less WD-40. I may not have noticed it as I have not often applied it to anything that is bare steel in contact with brass. Roughly how long did it take to observe this effect ? It could be bad in cases where an IC pin has had the rust cleaned off it to bare steel and there is a phosphor bronze spring contact in the socket.

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