Image Map Image Map
Results 1 to 10 of 10

Thread: 1970 Wang 700

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Connecticut, USA
    Posts
    2,056

    Default 1970 Wang 700

    So I might have mentioned on another post I was contacted about a 1980 MAI basic four computer. Upon getting onsite and seeing this beast the owner started telling me about the companies history. Architectural firm that started with his Grandfather in the 1940's. Anyway Their first foray into computing was with a 1970 Wang 700 "programmable calculator", Since the item was purchased two years before the current owner arrived to work at the family business his information on the device is incomplete. He remembers writing and loading cassette programs to the device.
    The unit was connected to an IBM Selectric typewrite which he also gave me. Unfortunately I forgot the documentation and binder of cassette software. I am pretty excited about a computer of this vintage. Does anyone have any information on it?

    See link for pictures and description of like model: https://www.si.edu/object/nmah_334351

  2. #2

    Default

    RICM has many Wang systems. http://www.ricomputermuseum.org/Home...ble-calculator

    This one look similar.

  3. #3

    Default

    I spent a lot of my youth on a Wang 600, and have collected some information, and knowledge, on the Wang 700. Including a simulator for it: http://wang700.durgadas.com/

    I can certainly answer some questions. There are also some docs at: https://www.oldcalculatormuseum.com/ (you'll need to dig a bit).

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Connecticut, USA
    Posts
    2,056

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by durgadas311 View Post
    I spent a lot of my youth on a Wang 600, and have collected some information, and knowledge, on the Wang 700. Including a simulator for it: http://wang700.durgadas.com/

    I can certainly answer some questions. There are also some docs at: https://www.oldcalculatormuseum.com/ (you'll need to dig a bit).
    Thanks Durgadas311, I will definitely reach out when I start my restore on the unit. I'm thinking late summer, if all goes well. Its definitely one of the more interesting units I have in my collection.

  5. #5

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by VERAULT View Post
    Thanks Durgadas311, I will definitely reach out when I start my restore on the unit. I'm thinking late summer, if all goes well. Its definitely one of the more interesting units I have in my collection.
    I think they hold a special place in history, on the cusp of the microcomputer age. Arguably, the first desktop computers. Wang had some pretty significant peripherals as well, including harddisk, teletypes, and industrial control/status. The harddisk interface could theoretically support a paging/swapping OS, although it's hard to image that being very practical. With modern technology such as rPI one could actually implement modern versions of those peripherals, although I doubt there's original software for them.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Connecticut, USA
    Posts
    2,056

    Default

    My unit came with an IBM selectrix typewriter (with Wang sticker) cabled to the Wang to print from. Are you saying there was a harddisk for the unit?

  7. #7

    Default

    The modified IBM Selectric (a.k.a. "Output Writer") was a fairly standard peripheral. There's a Wang patent for the modifications, I found online. You can also get most of the schematics, https://www.thebattles.net/oddments/wang/. There's also a lot of product brochures on the old calculator museum site I mentioned before. One peripheral was a harddisk, which seemed to consist of a removable (floppy?) drive plus a fixed disk.

    There are two connectors on the back, a 24-pin and a 36-pin. The 24-pin is output-only and mainly used by the typewriters (or plotters). The 36-pin is input/output and supports multiple devices being "daisy chained". A lot of sophistication for a "calculator"...

  8. #8

    Default

    Hopefully, you'll be able to get the original owner's documentation, but I did manage to snag a scan of the Wang 700 User's Guide awhile back. You can download from: http://sebhc.durgadas.com/w700-sim/W...UsersGuide.pdf. The network speed is not great, so you probably want to download once and view locally. I haven't gone through every page, but it looks to be legible.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Connecticut, USA
    Posts
    2,056

    Default

    Im not a calculator guy by any means. But this is on that cusp right around the time Micros were just starting out. There are so many things about this unit that make it seem a computer rather than a calculator. I was pretty excited to get it.

  10. #10

    Default

    They really were much more than a calculator. The 700 series was generally marketed more to scientific applications, and the 600 series was more business. In fact, there's an old Kurt Russell movie "Used Cars" where you can actually see a Wang 600 + Output Writer setup in the car dealer office. That was not a prop - they shot in a real car dealership and that dealer was using the Wang 600 to run their business.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •