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Thread: storing pc parts out in the open

  1. #21
    Join Date
    Feb 2017
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    Chilliwack, BC, Canada
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    I've heard that retrobrite can make plastic brittle, but to me it just sounds like it was already brittle if retrobriting is giving you issues.
    Alas, I must confess my ignorance. I am not a chemist, so I wouldn't know.
    My vintage systems: Tandy 1000 HX, Tandy 1000 RSX, Tandy 1100FD, Tandy 64K CoCo 2, Commodore VIC-20, and some random Pentium in a Hewitt Rand chassis...

    Some people keep a classic car in their garage. Some people keep vintage computers. The latter hobby is cheaper, usually takes less space, and is less likely to lead to a fatal accident.

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stone View Post
    Lithium is the first alkali metal in the periodic table!
    Clearly, Walter was talking about using Francium-ion cells.

  3. #23

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    Right, Francium... the phantom element.
    PM me if you're looking for 3" or 5" floppy disks. EMail For everything else, Take Another Step

  4. #24

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    The best selling batteries are created from the common elements that P.T. Barnum was made famous for discovering.

  5. #25
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    The trick to using batteries made with Fr-223 is to get them very fresh and use them quickly--preferably behind a thick lead shield.

  6. #26

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    The electrolyte in a normal alkaline cell is potassium hydroxide. It is water soluble and will absorb more water from the air when it leaks. The lithium cells would blow up with such an electrolyte. They use some type of organic electrolyte ( not sure what it is ). It is less reactive when leaking out. I have had to clean my Chevy fob from such a leak. Water does nothing to clean it. I had to use some type of solvent to clean it. I don't recall which I used but I think I used Brakeklean. The plastic parts didn't like it but I got the fob working again.
    Dwight

  7. #27

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    Years ago some people were certain that the mercury in batteries was the cause of illness.
    https://www.healthline.com/health/mercury-poisoning

    Since each battery has two poles the problem was somewhat Bipolar.

    It would seem that Lithium batteries are the cure.
    https://emedicine.medscape.com/article/815523-overview

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