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Thread: XT/AT CLICKY mechanical keyboards

  1. #1

    Default XT/AT CLICKY mechanical keyboards

    Hi,
    I want to sell Crystal Data KB-6251EA and Chicony E8H5IKKB-5162 with English-Russian layout. This is a clickable mechanical keyboards with a switch AT/XT. The keyboards are working, all the buttons are checked and working, without jamming and other problems.
    Let me know if you are interested.

    Chicony E8H5IKKB-5162:



    Crystal Data KB-6251EA:




    I can put on sale on ebay, where I have a positive rating.

  2. #2
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    If I didn't have a bunch of Model M keyboards, I'd probably go with the Chicony--has a good, positive "click' when keys are depressed. Probably an Alps clone.

  3. #3

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    Are such clickety keyboards desirable? I used to have one of these. It was from the late 80's and made such a ruckus when typed on. I trashed it more than 20 years ago and have never had regrets. Are they valuable now?

  4. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by feipoa View Post
    Are such clickety keyboards desirable? I used to have one of these. It was from the late 80's and made such a ruckus when typed on. I trashed it more than 20 years ago and have never had regrets. Are they valuable now?
    Depending on the type of key switches it uses, yes, it can be quite valuable. There are mechanical keyboard fetishists on sites like https://deskthority.net and https://geekhack.org that will pay top dollar for some vintage keyboards, especially IBM beam spring and capacitive buckling spring (Model F series) keyboards. Some even buy old IBM terminals just to poach the keyboard from it, and then try to sell the useless, keyboardless terminal on eBay or Craigslist afterwards.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by vwestlife View Post
    Depending on the type of key switches it uses, yes, it can be quite valuable. There are mechanical keyboard fetishists on sites like https://deskthority.net and https://geekhack.org that will pay top dollar for some vintage keyboards, especially IBM beam spring and capacitive buckling spring (Model F series) keyboards. Some even buy old IBM terminals just to poach the keyboard from it, and then try to sell the useless, keyboardless terminal on eBay or Craigslist afterwards.
    I seen this, I did something like it to a par of junk/broken POS system.
    One of the two keyboard had a funky complex white alps like switch that took oil off all things. Etch switch has a oil fill port about the size of a paper clip. There was a blank key that did nothing so I pulled it off and took it a apart, It had rubber seals in the switch and a pan for the oil to go into. Very different than anything I seen before or since.

    The other one I pulled did not work but I sold the alps switches off the keyboard for about 20$
    I have dyslexia, I have alot of trouble putting my thoughts into words and spelling/grammar is something I struggle with.
    You may need to read my posts twice to understand what I said.

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    Normally, I'd say that preference depends on training. I learned typing on a full-size office Underwood manual and was so happy to eventually get a portable electric (you can see its clone in the movie "Delirious" being used by John Candy).

    When I was out of school, I was able to avail myself of several very good typewriters, including an IBM prop-spacing Executive model. I still use a couple of Selectrics on occasion.

    My point is that all of these have positive aural and tactile feedback, which is what I'm used to. The puzzling thing for me is that keyboard hacking/collecting clan is far too young to be exposed to this. Hell, they type on laptops, which, to me have some of the worst keyboards ever made, tactile-wise. So, I don't understand the phenomenon.

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by Chuck(G) View Post
    So, I don't understand the phenomenon.
    Part of it is from the widely held belief among gamers that a mechanical keyboard will speed up your response time and thus improve your gaming performance.

    Indeed, most mechanical keyboards made today are specifically marketed towards gamers, with emphasis on flashy styling and multicolor LED lights.

  8. #8
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    Ow, my eyes! I have entertained adding a small low-intensity LED above my Model Ms so that I can find home in the dark.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Chuck(G) View Post
    Ow, my eyes! I have entertained adding a small low-intensity LED above my Model Ms so that I can find home in the dark.
    Look at some of the Corsair KB's - something there for everyone. I use the uncomplicated K70 with red only not RGB. Similar to this one but not a refurb (although might be okay coming from Newegg).

    https://www.newegg.com/Product/Produ...B&gclsrc=aw.ds
    Surely not everyone was Kung-fu fighting

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    Oddly enough, for the vintage stuff around my workshop, I've turned to using cheap rubber-dome keyboards. I have several and it's mostly a matter of grabbing one and pointing it at the right system. (not bluetooth, but IR).

    It works well enough.

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