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Thread: Used floppies

  1. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by SomeGuy View Post
    One can never have too many floppy disks
    I agree 100%.

    1) They're not being mass manufactured any more.

    2) Of the disks you currently have, some, maybe even many, will inevitably fail.

    Quote Originally Posted by SomeGuy View Post
    With 3.5" disks, the quality dropped off towards the end. Not that there weren't some low-quality brands before that. Somewhere I have a box of 3.5" disks that was one of the last ones on the local Microcenter's shelves. Wouldn't imagine those could take too much use.
    It's no different than with almost everything else. The longer it is manufactured the lower the quality gets.
    PM me if you're looking for 3" or 5" floppy disks. EMail For everything else, Take Another Step

  2. #12
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    Floppy disks continued to be improved even after 2000 though I have my doubts about Fuji's patented idea of placing a thin protective coating on top of a cheaper oxide layer. Two different types of glue seems likely to increase the chances of one peeling away.

  3. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by krebizfan View Post
    Floppy disks continued to be improved even after 2000 ...
    I don't agree with that statement. Do you have any way to substantiate that or are you just posing empty speculation?

    Would you like to submit 25 disks produced after 2000 to a neutral evaluator? I will submit 25 disks produced prior to 1990. That should yield some useful information for us to chew on.
    PM me if you're looking for 3" or 5" floppy disks. EMail For everything else, Take Another Step

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stone View Post
    I don't agree with that statement. Do you have any way to substantiate that or are you just posing empty speculation?

    Would you like to submit 25 disks produced after 2000 to a neutral evaluator? I will submit 25 disks produced prior to 1990. That should yield some useful information for us to chew on.
    I have seen the patents. Fuji continued enhancing their film coatings over the cookie through 2003 which was supposed to improve water and mold resistance. Are you sure you want to place 25 floppy disks in a chamber with a humidifier for years to see how much mold damage would occur? Sony had multiple minor enhancements to the shutter design.

    Now, the marketing driven iMac style translucent disks lacking most of the cleaning pad were a complete failure from a reliability stand point and thankfully were only on the market for a few months.

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by krebizfan View Post
    I have seen the patents. Fuji continued enhancing their film coatings over the cookie through 2003 which was supposed to improve water and mold resistance. Are you sure you want to place 25 floppy disks in a chamber with a humidifier for years to see how much mold damage would occur? Sony had multiple minor enhancements to the shutter design.

    Now, the marketing driven iMac style translucent disks lacking most of the cleaning pad were a complete failure from a reliability stand point and thankfully were only on the market for a few months.
    I'll be honest that my experience has proven the opposite. While I can completely understand there was improvements to the disk as far as humidity and mold, because of whatever other areas of the disk that became cheaper/worse, it probably doesn't matter. Meaning, if the disk itself starts becoming corrupt in 10 years due to inferior manufacturing, it doesn't really matter if it's mold resistant for 50 years. I've also found that it just wasn't the translucent disks (although that did spark the opinion that 'colored' disks were always worse then the non-colored ones), but most every disk made at a certain point. Many like the 'office depot' branded ones, because all the original manufacturers started to get out of the business at a point. I might even consider the opinion that disks created in the 90's were better than earlier disks because of improvements, but it makes me wonder why 5 1/4 disks invariably seem to have a higher percentage rate of reliability then the later 3 1/2 disks from any era? That said, there might be something to say for some improvements because name brand 720k 3 1/2 do seem to fail more often then name brand 1.44 3 1/2 seem to, at least in my experience. Who knows.
    -- Brian

    Working Systems: Apple IIe/II+/Mac+/Mac 512k, Atari 800/520STFM, Commodore 64/Amiga 3000/SX-64, IBM PS/1 2121-B82, Kaypro II, Osborne 1, Tandy 1000 SX, TI-99/4A, TRS-80 Model 4 GA
    Project Systems: Amstrad PCW 8256, Kaypro 2/84 (Bad Chips: 81-194, 81-189).

  6. #16
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    I really suspected in the early 2000s that the industry was trying to get rid of floppies all together, and began purposely manufacturing unreliable disks to help ween us away from them. By that time, except for certain brands, I was finding "at least" one unusable disk in ever new pack of ten, usually more. With 3.5" 1.44 meg disks, it's been my experience that the older disks seem to be made better.

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by fatwizard View Post
    I really suspected in the early 2000s that the industry was trying to get rid of floppies all together, and began purposely manufacturing unreliable disks to help ween us away from them. By that time, except for certain brands, I was finding "at least" one unusable disk in ever new pack of ten, usually more. With 3.5" 1.44 meg disks, it's been my experience that the older disks seem to be made better.
    Conversely, all the binned floppy disk sub-brands had been retired by the late 90s. Verbatim pared its lineup to only Datalife*; there no longer was a Datalife Plus (at twice the price) or plain Verbatim (2/3 of the price) or even the unlabeled disks at half price. I expect the overall quality of disks to be the same or better later but buying just the best disks was impossible. I recall the company I worked for in the early 90s went for bulk cheap disks with about a 50% failure rate.

  8. #18
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    The recipient of the disks will be looking at media that's mostly over 20 years old (hence the 720K and DSDD 5.25").

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