Image Map Image Map
Results 1 to 5 of 5

Thread: Anti-static foam

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Silicon Valley
    Posts
    1,813

    Default Anti-static foam

    There has been a twitter discussion about black anti-static foam eating IC leads.

    https://twitter.com/TubeTimeUS/statu...25948057382912

    short summary is it is the same "crumbly foam" failure mode of air filters made of polyurethane foam

    the hydrolysis through exposure to humidity releases acids which attack the IC leads

    Conductive Crosslink Polyethylene Foam doesn't have this problem

    http://www.correctproducts.com/ESD-P...link-Foam.html

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Pacific Northwest, USA
    Posts
    30,956
    Blog Entries
    20

    Default

    I gave up foam quite some time ago. It's mostly tubes for me now.

  3. #3

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Al Kossow View Post
    Conductive Crosslink Polyethylene Foam doesn't have this problem
    Is the pink closed-cell foam actually ESD safe? That stuff seems like it shouldn't degrade either, but I'm not sure of its conductivity.

    Quote Originally Posted by Chuck(G) View Post
    I gave up foam quite some time ago. It's mostly tubes for me now.
    I'm slowly but surely working on converting to tubes as well.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Silicon Valley
    Posts
    1,813

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by antiquekid3 View Post
    Is the pink closed-cell foam actually ESD safe?
    https://protektivepak.wordpress.com/...r-application/

    There are two broad classes of ESD foam, conductive (black) and dissipative (pink), and two base plastics, polyurethane and cross-linked polyethylene

    The problem is polyurethane breaks down when exposed to humidity, while cross-linked polyethylene
    does not.

    What I didn't know was there is a conductive cross-linked polyethylene foam, which is what I pointed to.
    Unfortunately, it may cost a lot more.

  5. #5

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Al Kossow View Post
    There are two broad classes of ESD foam, conductive (black) and dissipative (pink), and two base plastics, polyurethane and cross-linked polyethylene
    This is the pink closed-cell foam I was thinking of: https://www.westfloridacomponents.co...ic+Charge.html

    I'm not sure what it's made of, but it seems like it'll have a hard time degrading like the polyurethane stuff does. At least from that one website, the stuff seems relatively cheap.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •